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  1. Subscriber KingDavid403
    King David
    17 Sep '10 17:26
    In over the board tournament play, if someone tipps their king as in resigning can they one second later pick it back up and now choose not to resign??

    Thanks
  2. 17 Sep '10 17:32 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KingDavid403
    In over the board tournament play, if someone tipps their king as in resigning can they one second later pick it back up and now choose not to resign??

    Thanks
    Depends. If it was tipped over deliberately, then he can't change his mind. But if it was accidently knocked over, then there is no resignation.

    The touchy area becomes if the resigning person simply changed his mind and claimed that he accidently knocked over the king. Then it becomes his word against your word, unless there are other witnesses.

    Edit - If this happened to me, I probably wouldn't raise a stink over the issue, but it would lower my opinion of my opponent's ethics.
  3. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    17 Sep '10 17:33
    Make them sign your scoresheet, ends all discussion.
  4. Subscriber KingDavid403
    King David
    17 Sep '10 17:56 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by nimzo5
    Make them sign your scoresheet, ends all discussion.
    Make them sign your scoresheet, ends all discussion.
    I was more talking about if a player clearly tipped their king in resignation but then one second later picks it back up because they see they didn't really lose the game. Can they change their mind and not resign.

    My last game just finished is what brought this question to mind.
    Game 7726855 I moved my rook from f-8 to e-8 and my opponent thought they had lost their queen and resigned. But they could have blocked it with either their bishop or knight by moving it to e-4.
    I was wondering if in a over the board tournament could your opponent take back a tipp king in such a case after one second?
  5. Subscriber KingDavid403
    King David
    17 Sep '10 18:03
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    Depends. If it was tipped over deliberately, then he can't change his mind. But if it was accidently knocked over, then there is no resignation.

    The touchy area becomes if the resigning person simply changed his mind and claimed that he accidently knocked over the king. Then it becomes his word against your word, unless there are other witnesses.

    Edit ...[text shortened]... wouldn't raise a stink over the issue, but it would lower my opinion of my opponent's ethics.
    Thanks. 🙂
  6. 17 Sep '10 18:09
    Originally posted by KingDavid403
    [b]Make them sign your scoresheet, ends all discussion.
    I was more talking about if a player clearly tipped their king in resignation but then one second later picks it back up because they see they didn't really lose the game. Can they change their mind and not resign.

    My last game just finished is what brought this question to mind.
    [gid ...[text shortened]... the board tournament could your opponent take back a tipp king in such a case after one second?[/b]
    If the king was deliberately tipped over, then your opponent has officially resigned and can't continue the game, even if he changes his mind 1 second later. However, if your opponent claims the game isn't over, then you should do the following:
    1) Stop both clocks.
    2)Call the TD over to your board and explain what happened.

    If your opponent tells the TD that he just changed his mind, then the TD should award the game to you. However, if your opponent claims that he accidently knocked over the king, or that he didn't knock or tip it over at all, then the TD will probably ask if anyone else saw the event. If there are no other witnesses, the TD will probably give your opponent the benefit of the doubt and tell you to continue the game.
  7. Subscriber KingDavid403
    King David
    17 Sep '10 18:22
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    If the king was deliberately tipped over, then your opponent has officially resigned and can't continue the game, even if he changes his mind 1 second later. However, if your opponent claims the game isn't over, then you should do the following:
    1) Stop both clocks.
    2)Call the TD over to your board and explain what happened.

    If your opponent tells the ...[text shortened]... will probably give your opponent the benefit of the doubt and tell you to continue the game.
    Thanks so much.
    I saw a hugh brawl over this in a street game a few years ago. lol, I'm not kidding. The rule on the street is you can't take back a move once the fingers are removed. And a tipped king is also final unless the opponent chooses to let them play on. I was just curious what happens in over the board tournaments because I'm going to one soon.

    Thanks so much for your responses. 🙂
  8. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    17 Sep '10 18:35
    In all my OTB tournament games I have only seen someone turn over their king once. The normal outcome is to stop the clock shake hands and sign the score sheets. Be careful though, I have heard of people who whisper draw and then offer their hand as if they were resigning. 🙂
  9. Subscriber KingDavid403
    King David
    17 Sep '10 18:37
    Originally posted by nimzo5
    In all my OTB tournament games I have only seen someone turn over their king once. The normal outcome is to stop the clock shake hands and sign the score sheets. Be careful though, I have heard of people who whisper draw and then offer their hand as if they were resigning. 🙂
    lol, Thanks. 🙂
  10. 17 Sep '10 19:49 / 1 edit
    OTB most just stop the clocks and offer their hand.

    Some players wiggle their King like ringing a bell and then stop the clocks.

    King tippers are rare.
    (Though not all that uncommon at the minor events where
    it's often done with a warm smile.)

    Pieces scatterers are rarer but one lurks inside every chess player.

    Juniors pick up their Kings and slam them down on their side.

    I'm a clock stopper unless it's cute mating combo then I go along with the mate.

    A draw offer should be made before making a move and then make the move
    to avoid the "He resigned." , "No I offered a draw." scenario.

    Not a ploy I have met but at International events where language
    is a problem then it can and has happened.

    Mad Rook is correct but it can get cloudy.

    If the lad lays his King down but has not let go of the piece then
    you have him on touch move, nothing more.
    If he lets go of the King and even without stopping the clocks he has
    resigned, the game is over.

    Don't worry about it, it won't happen. Just go and have some fun.

    A true tale.

    A few years ago at the British Championship one player offered his hand,
    he had resigned. (he did not stop the clocks).
    His opponent thought he had resigned, witnesses thought he had resigned.

    Then he noticed that the mate had a loophole so suddenly made a move.
    In the chaos that followed he offered the excuse that he was just congratulating
    his opponent on making a good move. (as if.....).

    Enter the controller and because the witnesses failed to agree and the clocks
    were not stopped he had to accept the offending players incredible explanation.

    Justice prevailed and the handshaker did eventually lose.
    Suspect if any other result then you would have read about the murder in the papers.
  11. Subscriber no1marauder
    Humble and Kind
    17 Sep '10 20:06 / 1 edit
    I've never stopped a clock or signed a scoresheet in OTB to resign. I've never seen anyone else do it either. I tip my King; most just say "Good game" and offer a hand. If it's ambiguous, I usually ask them if they are resigning.

    I wonder if this is standard American practice.

    EDIT: USCF rule 13B states: Saying I resign or tipping over the King are relatively clear ways to resign.

    It then cautions that neither stopping the clocks or offering a handshake are necessarily resignations.
  12. 17 Sep '10 20:36
    That's a funny thought. :

    An opponent worriedly looks over the board for one saving move.

    He then forcefully gives his king a good thump, and the king plummets toward the table.

    On the way down, he finds an escape and frantically races to catch the fleeing king before anyone gets wise.

    It could be a fumble !!! Wait! He's caught it! He's caught it!

    Now, the king is returned, and a new move is made.

    The player pretends none of the above has happened and denies every bit of it.

    He then reassesses the last move and sees that his new move leaves him in check.

    He was mated all along!

    Have no fear! This guy has an answer for that too.

    This time he thumps his king and takes out the knight and bishop that cover the flight square.

    After a minor juggling act, he returns his king to the new square and switches the knight and bishop around.

    At this point, his opponents patience have been tested too much.

    This time the thump is delivered by his opponent right between the eyes.

    As he buckles back and collapses to the floor in his chair, he loses on time.

    He wasn't thinking about the clock, and neither were you !!!
  13. 17 Sep '10 21:08
    Hi No1.

    Got me thinking now of the videos clips or live games I've seen
    of players resigning.

    I cannot recall anyone on IM or GM level who has done it.

    Mind you these days they have these auto-boards for live games and the
    players might have been asked not to tip their Kings.

    I know they are told not to do any after game analysis on these
    boards as it screws up the auto score.

    Did Short not flick over his King v Kasparov?
  14. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    17 Sep '10 23:54
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    I've never stopped a clock or signed a scoresheet in OTB to resign. I've never seen anyone else do it either. I tip my King; most just say "Good game" and offer a hand. If it's ambiguous, I usually ask them if they are resigning.

    I wonder if this is standard American practice.

    EDIT: USCF rule 13B states: Saying I resign or tippin ...[text shortened]... ions that neither stopping the clocks or offering a handshake are necessarily resignations.
    In Florida USA I mostly see someone tip the King, then stop the clock, then offer a hand to shake. It's not unusual to see someone simply stop the clock, but I think I see more king tippers than not.

    Paul
  15. 18 Sep '10 08:10
    I'm a king tipper.
    I've only now realised this 😕

    Do we have a support group?

    toet.