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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    05 Dec '07 13:40
    It has been known for years that melatonin gets you to sleep at night and if you have bright lights in your bedroom, the light will inhibit the production or utilization of melatonin so it is harder to get to sleep in a lite up room. Recently it was discovered what band or color of light it is that produces that effect, and the color turns out to be blue. If you are hit with enough blue light when you go to bed, your melatonin will be inhibited. That leads to a way to help get to sleep, just by wearing glasses or contacts that block blue light. My question is this: if you go out looking for such glasses, when blue light is blocked from the normal white light spectrum, what is the resultant visible color of the glasses? I assume if I find such a color in a pair of glasses, it will be blocking blue light, does that follow?
  2. 05 Dec '07 15:23
    I'd imagine that they'd look blue as they reflect blue rather than allowing it to pass through.
  3. 05 Dec '07 15:28
    when blue light is blocked from the normal white light spectrum, what is the resultant visible color
    Yellow
  4. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's about respect
    05 Dec '07 15:54
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It has been known for years that melatonin gets you to sleep at night and if you have bright lights in your bedroom, the light will inhibit the production or utilization of melatonin so it is harder to get to sleep in a lite up room. Recently it was discovered what band or color of light it is that produces that effect, and the color turns out to be blue. I ...[text shortened]... e if I find such a color in a pair of glasses, it will be blocking blue light, does that follow?
    Glass is transparent, so it looks like the same color that it allows through. It will look blue. Think about it. If you want to put a filter on a light so that it makes blue light, you put a blue filter on it. Same idea.
  5. 05 Dec '07 16:36
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Glass is transparent, so it looks like the same color that it allows through. It will look blue. Think about it. If you want to put a filter on a light so that it makes blue light, you put a blue filter on it. Same idea.
    The idea was to have a pair of glasses that only blocked out blue, not a pair that only let blue light through. Other than that I think what you said is correct and I think a previous poster was correct in saying they would be yellow, since removing blue from the primary colours gives you red and green which makes yellow.
  6. 05 Dec '07 17:31
    Originally posted by Schumi
    I'd imagine that they'd look blue as they reflect blue rather than allowing it to pass through.
    blue absorbs blue
  7. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    05 Dec '07 19:24
    Originally posted by PaddyB
    The idea was to have a pair of glasses that only blocked out blue, not a pair that only let blue light through. Other than that I think what you said is correct and I think a previous poster was correct in saying they would be yellow, since removing blue from the primary colours gives you red and green which makes yellow.
    I called a camera store and talked to a filter guy there and he said if you have a filter that blocks blue, the filter looks yellow, so maybe thats the right idea.
  8. Standard member wolfgang59
    Infidel
    06 Dec '07 00:05
    Its yellow. The blue light is absorbed. white subtract blue is yellow. Newton knew this 300+ years ago ... nothing further to discuss.

    btw: never buy blue sunglasses ... very bad for the eyes letting thru higher energy light and promoting cataracts ...
  9. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's about respect
    06 Dec '07 03:46
    Originally posted by PaddyB
    The idea was to have a pair of glasses that only blocked out blue, not a pair that only let blue light through. Other than that I think what you said is correct and I think a previous poster was correct in saying they would be yellow, since removing blue from the primary colours gives you red and green which makes yellow.
    Oh.

    Well red and green don't make yellow. The opposite of blue is yellow + red = orange.
  10. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's about respect
    06 Dec '07 03:48
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It has been known for years that melatonin gets you to sleep at night and if you have bright lights in your bedroom, the light will inhibit the production or utilization of melatonin so it is harder to get to sleep in a lite up room. Recently it was discovered what band or color of light it is that produces that effect, and the color turns out to be blue. I ...[text shortened]... e if I find such a color in a pair of glasses, it will be blocking blue light, does that follow?
    I have my doubts about your facts. Night time is very blue. Do you have a reference? I'd think yellow light would keep you up, not blue light.
  11. Subscriber Ponderable
    chemist
    06 Dec '07 09:39
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Oh.

    Well red and green don't make yellow. The opposite of blue is yellow + red = orange.
    Are you talking about additive or subtractive mixing?
  12. 06 Dec '07 14:00
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Oh.

    Well red and green don't make yellow. The opposite of blue is yellow + red = orange.
    The primary colours of light are red, green and blue - not red, yellow and blue. And red and green do make yellow. Use any picture editing tool (paint will do) and create a custom colour with just full red and green with no blue and see what you get.
  13. Standard member rhb
    Ginger Scum
    06 Dec '07 14:08 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    It has been known for years that melatonin gets you to sleep at night and if you have bright lights in your bedroom, the light will inhibit the production or utilization of melatonin so it is harder to get to sleep in a lite up room. Recently it was discovered what band or color of light it is that produces that effect, and the color turns out to be blue. I ...[text shortened]... e if I find such a color in a pair of glasses, it will be blocking blue light, does that follow?
    Why not just turn the light off? Or buy some thicker curtains if it's an external light source?

    Edit... I appear to have wandered into P&P by mistake... where'd the generael forum go?
  14. Standard member Palynka
    Upward Spiral
    06 Dec '07 14:33 / 1 edit
    Ginger.

    The colour of the glasses, of course.
  15. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    It's about respect
    06 Dec '07 15:13
    Originally posted by PaddyB
    The primary colours of light are red, green and blue - not red, yellow and blue. And red and green do make yellow. Use any picture editing tool (paint will do) and create a custom colour with just full red and green with no blue and see what you get.
    Oh. I think I read that somewhere but I forgot.