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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. Subscriber joe shmo
    Strange Egg
    04 Apr '10 21:24
    Does anyone know the US customary units for angular momentum? An online assignment is being a real pain in my a$$.

    Eric
  2. Subscriber joe shmo
    Strange Egg
    04 Apr '10 23:17
    Originally posted by joe shmo
    Does anyone know the US customary units for angular momentum? An online assignment is being a real pain in my a$$.

    Eric
    Nevermind, it was trying to tell me that I was using a mixture of SI and US customary values within the calculation, not that the units on the answer were wrong.......woops😳

    Yet another reason for me to dislike online assignments.
  3. 05 Apr '10 09:48 / 1 edit
    I usually consult Wikipedia for such information at work. Most of the mathematics and physics entries are very infirmative and reliable.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angular_momentum

    I try to stick with SI units everywhere, and certainly don't touch imperial units like feet, pounds and knots. Having said that though, I only really understand the size of angles in degrees, my head doesn't yet think in fractions of a radian sadly.
  4. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    05 Apr '10 13:20
    Originally posted by iamatiger
    I usually consult Wikipedia for such information at work. Most of the mathematics and physics entries are very infirmative and reliable.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angular_momentum

    I try to stick with SI units everywhere, and certainly don't touch imperial units like feet, pounds and knots. Having said that though, I only really understand the size of angles in degrees, my head doesn't yet think in fractions of a radian sadly.
    Yeah, like just how big is a half radian?🙂
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Just another day
    05 Apr '10 17:10 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by iamatiger
    I usually consult Wikipedia for such information at work. Most of the mathematics and physics entries are very infirmative and reliable.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angular_momentum

    I try to stick with SI units everywhere, and certainly don't touch imperial units like feet, pounds and knots. Having said that though, I only really understand the size of angles in degrees, my head doesn't yet think in fractions of a radian sadly.
    The radian is a unit of plane angle, equal to 180/pi degrees, or about 57.2958 degrees.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radian

    You can convert directly from radians to degrees and vice versa.
  6. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Just another day
    05 Apr '10 17:11
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    Yeah, like just how big is a half radian?🙂
    90/pi degrees
  7. Standard member forkedknight
    Defend the Universe
    05 Apr '10 17:35
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    The radian is a unit of plane angle, equal to 180/pi degrees, or about 57.2958 degrees.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radian

    You can convert directly from radians to degrees and vice versa.
    Yeah, if I have to estimate with radians, I usually just round pi to 3 for any in-my-head calculations and adjust it by about 5% later.

    1 radian ~= 60 degrees is pretty good for estimation purposes. If you do the 5% adjustment, it brings you within 1% of the correct answer.