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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. 26 Jun '05 13:00

    White to move. Mate in 8.
  2. 26 Jun '05 14:07
    Originally posted by Shiny Knight
    [fen]kq3r2/8/2Kn4/1rn5/1P6/5RN1/6BB/5RN1 w - - 0 1[/fen]
    White to move. Mate in 8.
    1.Ra3+ Qa7 2.Rxf8+ Rb8 3.Kxd6+ Nb7+ 4.Kc7 Qxa3 5.Rxb8+ Ka7 6.Rxb7+ Ka8 /6...Ka6 7.Bf1+ Qd3 8.Bxd3# / 7.Rb8++ Ka7 8.Ra8#
  3. 26 Jun '05 17:30
    Originally posted by ilywrin
    1.Ra3+ Qa7 2.Rxf8+ Rb8 3.Kxd6+ Nb7+ 4.Kc7 Qxa3 5.Rxb8+ Ka7 6.Rxb7+ Ka8 /6...Ka6 7.Bf1+ Qd3 8.Bxd3# / 7.Rb8++ Ka7 8.Ra8#
    You're right, well done.
  4. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    27 Jun '05 02:43
    Originally posted by Shiny Knight
    [fen]kq3r2/8/2Kn4/1rn5/1P6/5RN1/6BB/5RN1 w - - 0 1[/fen]
    White to move. Mate in 8.
    These types of problems are a bit too easy to solve, thanks to all the obvious checking moves and forced replies.
  5. 27 Jun '05 07:39 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by BigDoggProblem
    These types of problems are a bit too easy to solve, thanks to all the obvious checking moves and forced replies.
    I thought it wasn't all that obvious which rook to use on the first move to check at the a-file. But maybe the question should have referred to that, instead of just 'mate in 8'. Looking at the other mate-problems in this forum I can safely say: you are right. I am humbled. Rattled.

    But in my defense: I cooked up the ones I posted myself; I think I did a 'nice' job (for an amateur).

    Maybe it's more of a pose than a puzzle, okay...
  6. 27 Jun '05 08:15
    Shiny Knight it was a good problem for starters But still you can get better. Chess puzzles that start with check are usually rare. A forced play is another thing that is rare; Perhaps you should look at these themes to get an idea what is used in composing classical chess problems: Novotny, Grimshaw, Bristol, Plachuta just to name a few.
    Start with simple 2, 3 movers and gradually work your way up.
    When composing sometimes working the other way around may help: Get a good looking mate (one that is not easy to see i.e. in the center, or with an unusual setup), and then try to add foreplay. You begin with mate in 1 and gradually add a move here and there. This will not always work but when it does, it turns out great Ah, yes, always use a computer to double check that is the only possible solution, move order, etc.
  7. 27 Jun '05 08:32
    Originally posted by ilywrin
    Shiny Knight it was a good problem for starters But still you can get better. Chess puzzles that start with check are usually rare. A forced play is another thing that is rare; Perhaps you should look at these themes to get an idea what is used in composing classical chess problems: Novotny, Grimshaw, Bristol, Plachuta just to name a few.
    Start with simp ...[text shortened]... es, always use a computer to double check that is the only possible solution, move order, etc.
    I also just liked the look of it, by the way. A bit na-ive perhaps, it's all part of growing up!

    Anyway; thanks for the advice! My next problem will contain a Loschinskij theme leading to a Barulinian longshot, ending up in a classic Dombrovski-Le Grand dilemma.
    (Damn, I gave it away.)