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Posers and Puzzles

Posers and Puzzles

  1. 08 Mar '06 00:13
    how many would agree with me that our universe is not the only universe but just 1 in an infinant array of oher parrelel universes all connected by worm holes.
  2. 08 Mar '06 02:00
    Isn't that the many worlds theory? But I've never heard about the parallel universes being connected by wormholes. to answer your question though, there is really no way to prove whether or not the theory is right or wrong. The only experiment I've heard involves pointing a gun at your head and pulling the trigger; if the gun misfires several times in a row, you can be pretty sure the theory is right (because you'd only survive in the universes where the gun had misfired). I'll admit it's a cool concept though.
  3. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    08 Mar '06 03:20
    Originally posted by rubikscuber
    how many would agree with me that our universe is not the only universe but just 1 in an infinant array of oher parrelel universes all connected by worm holes.
    There have been several articles in Scientific American about the
    multiple universe thing, one in such a positive way that he thinks
    its a done deal. Of course there is a lot of debate on that one!
    There is an article in the latest issue about it seeming to say
    our universe IS a black hole and there are possible testable theories
    that say that gravity is a kind of multi dimensional glue that goes
    through all the extra dimensions which if true explains why gravity
    is so weak compared to the other forces, electro-weak,strong, etc.
    The test involves the idea there are kind of curled up extra
    dimensions all around us but maybe testable by the concept that
    if this idea is true it should effect how gravity responds at short
    distances, if there is a variant from the inverse square law at very
    short distances, microns (millionths of a meter) or less, its a sign
    that something is interfering with gravity on such small scales and
    that something is extra dimensions. So far there have been not much
    evidence in the way of variants from inverse square down to about
    100 microns (one tenth of a millimeter) and the experimentalists
    are worrying away at getting reliable repeatable results at less than
    that. News at 11.
  4. Standard member leisurelysloth
    Man of Steel
    08 Mar '06 04:41
    Originally posted by Ramiri15
    Isn't that the many worlds theory? But I've never heard about the parallel universes being connected by wormholes. to answer your question though, there is really no way to prove whether or not the theory is right or wrong. The only experiment I've heard involves pointing a gun at your head and pulling the trigger; if the gun misfires several times in a ...[text shortened]... he theory is right (because you'd only survive in the universes where the gun had misfired).
    WARNING: Do not try this at home kids! This experiment should only by conducted by highly trained, professional cosmologists.
  5. Standard member TheMaster37
    Kupikupopo!
    08 Mar '06 14:15 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Ramiri15
    if the gun misfires several times in a row, you can be pretty sure the theory is right (because you'd only survive in the universes where the gun had misfired).
    How does that prove anything besides you being lucky?
  6. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    08 Mar '06 17:09
    Originally posted by TheMaster37
    How does that prove anything besides you being lucky?
    I think he is thinking about the Schroders Cat thing, you may
    remember that thought experiment from about 100 years ago,
    a cat is put in a box with a poison capsule that is controlled by
    a special radioactive device that until you disturb it, you don't know
    whether the cat is alive or dead, only if you open the box,
    as an illustration of the uncertainty principle.
  7. 09 Mar '06 06:25
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    There is an article in the latest issue about it seeming to say
    our universe IS a black hole and there are possible testable theories
    that say that gravity is a kind of multi dimensional glue that goes
    through all the extra dimensions which if true explains why gravity
    is so weak compared to the other forces, electro-weak,strong, etc.
    The idea that gravity is weak because of interactions with additional dimensions is also the basis behind the braneworld theory, which basically states that the universe as we see it is essentially a three dimensional brane. The reasoning behind this is a little difficult, but here goes. The equations of superstring theory imply that the three non-gravity force carriers (for the electromagnetic force, the strong nuclear force, and the weak nuclear force) are "open strings," meaning they have endpoints, and can get "stuck" to the brane (our universe). However, the graviton, the force carrier for gravity, is a closed string, and therefore cannot stick to the brane. Thus, unlike the other forces, which are unable to interact whith the smaller dimensions due to their being "stuck" to the brane, gravity is the only force free to interact with the extra dimensions. Essentially, this means that gravity is the only force that can "see" the dimensions, and since we see everything with the electromagnetic force (photons), the extra dimensions could be right under our noses and much larger than originally predicted. Thus, if the search for the breaking of the inverse square law yields positive results, then we can be pretty sure the extra dimensions exist (and that we are living on a braneworld). But as sonhouse previously mentioned, we have shown that the extra dimensions cannot be larger than .1 millimeters. Unfortunately, since there is no lower limit to the size of the dimensions (within reasonable range of our technologies), the theory cannot really be disproven with this method. So.......yeah. I hope I didn't butcher that too much.
  8. 09 Mar '06 06:31
    Originally posted by TheMaster37
    How does that prove anything besides you being lucky?
    Basically, if the universe is infinitely dividing every plack length into every possible outcome, then there will exist a series of universes where the gun has misfired repeatedly several times in a row. However in about 99.999% of the universes you would be dead, but in the ones in which you've survived, you could be pretty sure it was because the many worlds theory is correct. But, essentially, it proves nothing even if you tried it. I just thought it was funny.
  9. Standard member TheMaster37
    Kupikupopo!
    09 Mar '06 09:35
    Originally posted by Ramiri15
    Basically, if the universe is infinitely dividing every plack length into every possible outcome, then there will exist a series of universes where the gun has misfired repeatedly several times in a row. However in about 99.999% of the universes you would be dead, but in the ones in which you've survived, you could be pretty sure it was because the many wo ...[text shortened]... rrect. But, essentially, it proves nothing even if you tried it. I just thought it was funny.
    Heh, the other worlds don't have to exist in order for you to be very very lucky

    Though, if you assume the existence of those parallel universes, you might be inclined to believe that your fate is already predetermined. Either you're in the universe where you survive, or you're not.
  10. 09 Mar '06 12:53
    Originally posted by rubikscuber
    how many would agree with me that our universe is not the only universe but just 1 in an infinant array of oher parrelel universes all connected by worm holes.
    I've polled by counterparts in all the infinate universes and roughly 50% of us agree and 50% disagree, so we are in infinate agreement and infinate disagreement. This did/will take an infinate amount of time to complete, but luckily I am in the parallel universe where I already know the answer.
  11. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    09 Mar '06 16:48
    Originally posted by kody magic
    I've polled by counterparts in all the infinate universes and roughly 50% of us agree and 50% disagree, so we are in infinate agreement and infinate disagreement. This did/will take an infinate amount of time to complete, but luckily I am in the parallel universe where I already know the answer.
    So do you parallel park as well in all those universes?
  12. 10 Mar '06 00:38
    Originally posted by kody magic
    I've polled by counterparts in all the infinate universes and roughly 50% of us agree and 50% disagree, so we are in infinate agreement and infinate disagreement. This did/will take an infinate amount of time to complete, but luckily I am in the parallel universe where I already know the answer.
    but in those other universes they already know the answer to its just not going to be the same as your because every answer to the question will be answered making an infanite amout of possabilities
  13. 10 Mar '06 10:55
    I am not in a parallel universe. But my other me in the parallel universe says that he is in the original universe and I'm in the parallel.
    Who is right?
  14. Standard member gollumprawn
    it's mine
    12 Mar '06 05:06
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I think he is thinking about the Schroders Cat thing, you may
    remember that thought experiment from about 100 years ago,
    a cat is put in a box with a poison capsule that is controlled by
    a special radioactive device that until you disturb it, you don't know
    whether the cat is alive or dead, only if you open the box,
    as an illustration of the uncertainty principle.
    the cat is 100 yrs old and is still alive
  15. 12 Mar '06 15:51
    Originally posted by sonhouse
    I think he is thinking about the Schroders Cat thing, you may
    remember that thought experiment from about 100 years ago,
    a cat is put in a box with a poison capsule that is controlled by
    a special radioactive device that until you disturb it, you don't know
    whether the cat is alive or dead, only if you open the box,
    as an illustration of the uncertainty principle.
    Schrodinger's Cat illustrates superposition (wave particle duality in this particular case), not the uncertainty principle.