1. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    20 May '07 12:50
    The integration sign in calculus and the summation sign both are stylized versions of what common symbol?
  2. Standard memberTheMaster37
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    20 May '07 13:01
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    The integration sign in calculus and the summation sign both are stylized versions of what common symbol?
    I assume you pose this question for non-mathematicianS?
  3. Montgomery
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    20 May '07 13:31
    Originally posted by TheMaster37
    I assume you pose this question for non-mathematicianS?
    I would guesS you are correct in that assumption...
  4. tinyurl.com/ywohm
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    20 May '07 13:461 edit
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    The integration sign in calculus and the summation sign both are stylized versions of what common symbol?
    The greek letter sigma? Or epsilon? It would help if I knew greek...
  5. Pittsburgh, PA
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    20 May '07 16:10
    greek letter sigma.
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    20 May '07 16:54
    That's sort of a stretch, though. The integral sign isn't a sigma, it's an S. A lowercase sigma looks like an S, but only when it's at the end of a word; more to the point, Leibniz, who came up with this notation, was surely thinking of the Latin alphabet. He used d for derivatives, after all.
  7. Pittsburgh, PA
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    20 May '07 16:57
    Originally posted by CZeke
    That's sort of a stretch, though. The integral sign isn't a sigma, it's an S. A lowercase sigma looks like an S, but only when it's at the end of a word; more to the point, Leibniz, who came up with this notation, was surely thinking of the Latin alphabet. He used d for derivatives, after all.
    but still, it's sigma - upper case for the summation and lower for integral. Yeah, it looks like latin s, but can be also read as greek letter.
  8. Subscribercoquette
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    20 May '07 23:50
    Originally posted by Allderdice
    but still, it's sigma - upper case for the summation and lower for integral. Yeah, it looks like latin s, but can be also read as greek letter.
    what's the delta?
  9. Pittsburgh, PA
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    21 May '07 00:33
    uppercase delta looks loke a triangle with one side extended and is a symbol for difference in conditions (e. g. final-initial), lowercase delta is like an "o" with a '~' on top of it and a lone connecting the two. It's also used to show the difference, but only in chemistry - it shows, which end of a molecule is polar + and which is polar -. The uppercase is used mostly in physics.
  10. SubscriberAThousandYoung
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    21 May '07 01:02
    Originally posted by TheMaster37
    I assume you pose this question for non-mathematicianS?
    Yeah, I suppose I did.
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    21 May '07 01:57
    Originally posted by coquette
    what's the delta?
    I hope you are not like the coquette in Moliere's Misanthrope, Celimene, the girl who drives me, Alceste to want to leave the world.
  12. Subscribercoquette
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    21 May '07 04:12
    Originally posted by Allderdice
    uppercase delta looks loke a triangle with one side extended and is a symbol for difference in conditions (e. g. final-initial), lowercase delta is like an "o" with a '~' on top of it and a lone connecting the two. It's also used to show the difference, but only in chemistry - it shows, which end of a molecule is polar + and which is polar -. The uppercase is used mostly in physics.
    Actually, my question was a joke. "What's the delta?" Greek, delta, difference, differential. (sigh)
  13. Subscribercoquette
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    21 May '07 04:13
    Originally posted by demonseed
    I hope you are not like the coquette in Moliere's Misanthrope, Celimene, the girl who drives me, Alceste to want to leave the world.
    sure, monsieur, you stand too close, but you may have my hand, si vous pleas
  14. Pittsburgh, PA
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    21 May '07 10:30
    Originally posted by coquette
    Actually, my question was a joke. "What's the delta?" Greek, delta, difference, differential. (sigh)
    😳
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