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Culture Forum

Culture Forum

  1. 28 Feb '08 04:26 / 2 edits
    I'll start with three that I've been listening to by pianists that should be better known. I highly recommend all of them.

    Ran Blake "All That is Tied"
    A full track MP3 is available below as well as some very good prices on some very good albums.
    http://www.ranblake.com/discography.html

    Paul Bley "Homage to Carla"
    A master of everything from Bebop to the Avant-garde. Bley has a very distinctive sound whose influence can be heard in pianists such as Keith Jarrett. Jarrett is more popular only because Bley is less compromising.

    Jean-Michel Pilc "Follow Me"
    Saw him in concert a couple of years ago. Remarkably inventive young pianist.
  2. 29 Feb '08 21:21
    Keith Jarrett, The Melody, at Night, With you
    recorded after he had CFS for several years. Absolutely beautiful I think.
  3. 01 Mar '08 03:03 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Steinberg
    Keith Jarrett, The Melody, at Night, With you
    recorded after he had CFS for several years. Absolutely beautiful I think.
    Yes, it has a fragile quality that is quite beautiful. I've just been listening to it. Thanks for reminding me.

    Do you have other favorites?
  4. 01 Mar '08 04:40
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    Yes, it has a fragile quality that is quite beautiful. I've just been listening to it. Thanks for reminding me.

    Do you have other favorites?
    I'll go with Solo Monk
  5. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    01 Mar '08 15:50 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    Bley has a very distinctive sound whose influence can be heard in pianists such as Keith Jarrett. Jarrett is more popular only because Bley is less compromising.
    I love Bley's work. Don't be too readily inclined to believe anybody who says that they have all his records because he has recorded an unbelievable number with all sorts of people. I Have a mere 19 of his CDs here. I've heard or borrowed another dozen or so over the years. However, I sometimes wonder about the alleged "influence" he has had on Keith Jarrett. I have read in several places that Jarrett didn't listen to much Bley back when it might have shaped Jarrett's approach and style. Bley sounds really different to me. Brilliant but different. The Keith Jarrett Trio, in my estimation, now surpasses the Bill Evans Trio in terms of sheer brilliance, quantity, inventiveness and cohesiveness. I think what they have achieved is truly important in terms of the trio format and they continue to be some distance removed from the 'mainstream' (they probably only sell about 10% as many CDs as Bob James, for example) which is testimony to Jarrett's refusal to compromise. As much as I love Paul Bley, I don't think he could pull off what Jarrett's trio do. And much to my dismay, Bley's recent live solo performance (released by ECM) called "Solo in Mondsee" was surprisingly underwhelming.
  6. 01 Mar '08 17:45
    Originally posted by FMF
    I love Bley's work. Don't be too readily inclined to believe anybody who says that they have all his records because he has recorded an unbelievable number with all sorts of people. I Have a mere 19 of his CDs here. I've heard or borrowed another dozen or so over the years. However, I sometimes wonder about the alleged "influence" he has had on Keith Jarrett. I ...[text shortened]... rmance (released by ECM) called "Solo in Mondsee" was surprisingly underwhelming.
    This is interesting. I'd be surprised if Bley was incapable of "pulling off" what Jarrett does with his trio. If anything, I tend to think of Jarrett as being the more limited artist.

    I tend to think of Jarrett's music as having more emotional appeal and Bley's as having more cerebral appeal. Jarrett's habit of piling on climax after climax cuts two ways. It can be perceived as exciting or excessive depending on the disposition of the listener, but it no doubt adds to his popularity.

    As to your Bob James example, well, there's compromise and then there's COMPROMISE

    As far as what can be done in a trio format, I tend to look at groupings such as Graewe/Reijseger/Hemingway, Crispell/Guy/Lytton, Fujii/Dresser/Black, etc.
  7. 01 Mar '08 17:53
    Originally posted by FMF
    I love Bley's work. Don't be too readily inclined to believe anybody who says that they have all his records because he has recorded an unbelievable number with all sorts of people. I Have a mere 19 of his CDs here. I've heard or borrowed another dozen or so over the years. However, I sometimes wonder about the alleged "influence" he has had on Keith Jarrett. I ...[text shortened]... rmance (released by ECM) called "Solo in Mondsee" was surprisingly underwhelming.
    I'm sorry to hear that about Solo in Mondsee since I ordered it this week. I'll have to wait and hear.
  8. 01 Mar '08 17:56
    Originally posted by badmoon
    I'll go with Solo Monk
    Do mean the compilation on Columbia? That's a good one as are "Alone in San Francisco" and "Himself". I really like Monk.
  9. 01 Mar '08 18:03 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    This is interesting. I'd be surprised if Bley was incapable of "pulling off" what Jarrett does with his trio. If anything, I tend to think of Jarrett as being the more limited artist.

    I tend to think of Jarrett's music as having more emotional appeal and Bley's as having more cerebral appeal. Jarrett's habit of piling on climax after climax cuts tw pings such as Graewe/Reijseger/Hemingway, Crispell/Guy/Lytton, Fujii/Dresser/Black, etc.
    wow! and not one mention of the oscar peterson trio, they shaped the trio format, in the 60's no one could better them
  10. 01 Mar '08 18:04
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    This is interesting. I'd be surprised if Bley was incapable of "pulling off" what Jarrett does with his trio. If anything, I tend to think of Jarrett as being the more limited artist.

    I tend to think of Jarrett's music as having more emotional appeal and Bley's as having more cerebral appeal. Jarrett's habit of piling on climax after climax cuts tw ...[text shortened]... pings such as Graewe/Reijseger/Hemingway, Crispell/Guy/Lytton, Fujii/Dresser/Black, etc.
    the solo jazz album by monty alexander is very good
  11. 01 Mar '08 18:32
    Originally posted by eatmybishop
    wow! and not one mention of the oscar peterson trio, they shaped the trio format, in the 60's no one could better them
    We're talking solo piano, not trios. Someone should chime in with Art Tatum soon.
  12. 01 Mar '08 18:34
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    Do mean the compilation on Columbia? That's a good one as are "Alone in San Francisco" and "Himself". I really like Monk.
    Yes. The Columbia recoding from 1964.
  13. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    01 Mar '08 18:40
    Originally posted by ThinkOfOne
    I tend to think of Jarrett as being the more limited artist.

    I tend to think of Jarrett's music as having more emotional appeal and Bley's as having more cerebral appeal. Jarrett's habit of piling on climax after climax cuts two ways. It can be perceived as exciting or excessive depending on the disposition of the listener, but it no doubt adds to his popularity.
    LOL. I enjoyed your elaborately subtle put down!

    Personally, the more jazz I listen to (and it's been half my life now), the less of a jazz snob I have become. At least I hope so. You imply that Bley's prowess would mean he could forego the need to spend 27 years building a startling trio empathy as Jarrett has done with Gary Peakock and Jack DeJohnette. Maybe you are right. Or maybe you mean he would have "pulled it off" in less time. In, say, 17 years. Whatever. In music, does 'cerebral' trump 'emotional' then? Always? Too much of the later means that the art is 'limited'? If there is not enough of the former does it mean that there is a 'danger' that the art might become popular?
  14. 01 Mar '08 19:08
    Originally posted by FMF
    LOL. I enjoyed your elaborately subtle put down!

    Personally, the more jazz I listen to (and it's been half my life now), the less of a jazz snob I have become. At least I hope so. You imply that Bley's prowess would mean he could forego the need to spend 27 years building a startling trio empathy as Jarrett has done with Gary Peakock and Jack DeJohnette. Mayb ...[text shortened]... the former does it mean that there is a 'danger' that the art might become popular?
    I feel the same way about the jazz snob comment. I'll listen to and enjoy Kenny Garrett, Norah Jones, Diana Krall and so forth.

    Look how Miles changed over the years. I guess a jazz snob would dismiss his later year's work but it has some of his finest horn playing, albeit doing Toto and Michael Jackson numbers.
  15. 01 Mar '08 19:16
    Originally posted by FMF
    LOL. I enjoyed your elaborately subtle put down!

    Personally, the more jazz I listen to (and it's been half my life now), the less of a jazz snob I have become. At least I hope so. You imply that Bley's prowess would mean he could forego the need to spend 27 years building a startling trio empathy as Jarrett has done with Gary Peakock and Jack DeJohnette. Mayb ...[text shortened]... the former does it mean that there is a 'danger' that the art might become popular?
    You really read too much into things. My initial comments were in response to your saying "I don't think he could pull off what Jarrett's trio do". I think he could. It also occurred to me that if I had to say one way or the other, it seems to me that Jarrett would have more trouble "pulling off" what Bley has done. I notice you cut the "If anything..." when you quoted my post. What's up with that? Also I don't know where you pulled these "time", "cerebral trump[s] emotional" and "danger that the art might become popular" things from.