Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 23 Jun '10 21:37
    Try not to be so disrespectful the next time my grandfather visits Paris.
    He didn't remember being hassled for his passport during WW2. In fact he didn't remember any of you frenchies being there at all to greet him when storming the beach. He's old. it took him a while to get it out of his bag.

    Below is a famous reminder of what the french did while Germany was marching down their streets.

    http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/File:Frenchman_crying.png

    That's right. Clap, cry and STFU. The big boys are on their way to save you. Probally your granddaddy in the picture.
  2. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    23 Jun '10 21:49
    Originally posted by Sikora
    Try not to be so disrespectful the next time my grandfather visits Paris.
    He didn't remember being hassled for his passport during WW2. In fact he didn't remember any of you frenchies being there at all to greet him when storming the beach. He's old. it took him a while to get it out of his bag.

    Below is a famous reminder of what the french did while Germ ...[text shortened]... nd STFU. The big boys are on their way to save you. Probally your granddaddy in the picture.
    Guess we're even; there might not be a US if not for the French:

    The Battle of Chesapeake Capes, also known as the Battle of the Virginia Capes, was a crucial naval battle in the Revolutionary War, which occurred near the mouth of Chesapeake Bay between a British fleet led by Rear Adm. Thomas Graves and a French fleet led by Rear Adm. Comte de Grasse. It was the only major defeat for the British Royal Navy in the 18th and 19th centuries.
    The victory by the French fleet prevented the Royal Navy from resupplying the forces of Gen. Lord Charles Cornwallis at Yorktown, Virginia. It also prevented interference with the supply of troops and supply from New York to the armies of Gen. George Washington through Chesapeake Bay. As a result, Cornwallis surrendered after the Battle of Yorktown and Great Britain later recognized the independence of the United States.

    http://www.myrevolutionarywar.com/battles/810905.htm
  3. 23 Jun '10 21:54
    http://www.made-in-england.org/images/frenchman.gif
  4. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    23 Jun '10 21:55
    Originally posted by Sikora
    Try not to be so disrespectful the next time my grandfather visits Paris.
    Is your grandfather whodey?
  5. Subscriber no1marauder
    It's Nice to Be Nice
    23 Jun '10 22:00
    Originally posted by Sikora
    Try not to be so disrespectful the next time my grandfather visits Paris.
    He didn't remember being hassled for his passport during WW2. In fact he didn't remember any of you frenchies being there at all to greet him when storming the beach. He's old. it took him a while to get it out of his bag.

    Below is a famous reminder of what the french did while Germ ...[text shortened]... nd STFU. The big boys are on their way to save you. Probally your granddaddy in the picture.
    By 1944, it is estimated that there were 100,000 members of the various resistance movements that existed in France. Just one year earlier, there were just 40,000 members.. By the spring of 1944, there were 60 intelligence cells whose task was solely to collect intelligence as opposed to carrying out acts of sabotage. In the build up to D-Day, the intelligence they gathered was vital. In May 1944 alone, they sent 3,000 written reports to the Allies and 700 wireless reports. Between April and May, the resistance destroyed 1,800 railway engines. When this figure is added to the 2,400 destroyed by Allied bombers, it is easy to understand why the Germans had such difficulty transporting equipment across France.

    http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/french_resistance.htm


    Your grandfather might be alive today because some French resistance fighter passed valuable information to SHAEF. Or blew up a railway engine that might have transported Nazi troops to the beachhead. They might have lost their lives doing so.

    Appreciation swings both ways.
  6. 23 Jun '10 22:17
    Originally posted by no1marauder
    By 1944, it is estimated that there were 100,000 members of the various resistance movements that existed in France. Just one year earlier, there were just 40,000 members.. By the spring of 1944, there were 60 intelligence cells whose task was solely to collect intelligence as opposed to carrying out acts of sabotage. In the build up to D-Day, the intell ...[text shortened]... head. They might have lost their lives doing so.

    Appreciation swings both ways.
    He appreciated them just fine. It was not he who was being disrespectful. The guards or whatever you call them in the airport were waiting for him to grab his passport which is fine. I know it's their job but when it took him a few seconds longer than they liked one turned to the other and said " These Americans think they can go wherever they want in French" My mother who was there also understands French.
  7. 23 Jun '10 22:18
    Have you read the "Anti-Americanism in France" thread?