Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Subscribersonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    slatington, pa, usa
    Joined
    28 Dec '04
    Moves
    52856
    30 Jul '17 17:15
    First denied visa's to come to the US since they were OBVIOUSLY terrorists, then allowed in, entered robot competition and won silver.

    OBVIOUS terrorist tactics.

    https://www.themarysue.com/afghanistan-girls-robotics-team-silver-medal/
  2. Joined
    12 Jul '08
    Moves
    12091
    30 Jul '17 18:35
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    First denied visa's to come to the US since they were OBVIOUSLY terrorists, then allowed in, entered robot competition and won silver.

    OBVIOUS terrorist tactics.

    https://www.themarysue.com/afghanistan-girls-robotics-team-silver-medal/
    Why would girl robots be terrorists?
  3. Standard memberfinnegan
    GENS UNA SUMUS
    To the Left
    Joined
    25 Jun '06
    Moves
    64930
    30 Jul '17 18:47
    Originally posted by @eladar
    Why would girl robots be terrorists?
    Why indeed? Ask Trump.

    "Next year’s competition will take place in Mexico. One hopes that by then we’ll have a world without Trump’s gruesome travel ban – and one without a new, equally gruesome wall between the competition’s first home and its second."
  4. Joined
    12 Jul '08
    Moves
    12091
    30 Jul '17 19:08
    Originally posted by @finnegan
    Why indeed? Ask Trump.

    "Next year’s competition will take place in Mexico. One hopes that by then we’ll have a world without Trump’s gruesome travel ban – and one without a new, equally gruesome wall between the competition’s first home and its second."
    You have quoted a person with a weird view of gruesome.

    Travel bans and walls bad, muslim stabbing and killing people not so bad.
  5. Joined
    11 Nov '05
    Moves
    43938
    30 Jul '17 20:27
    Go, girls, go!
    You're the best! 🙂
  6. Zugzwang
    Joined
    08 Jun '07
    Moves
    2120
    30 Jul '17 21:10
    Originally posted by @sonhouse
    First denied visa's to come to the US since they were OBVIOUSLY terrorists, then allowed in, entered robot competition and won silver.

    OBVIOUS terrorist tactics.

    https://www.themarysue.com/afghanistan-girls-robotics-team-silver-medal/
    I have great empathy for these young women from Afghanistan.
    Yet I would like to set straight some misleading impressions that casual readers may have.

    "Afghanistan’s All-Girl Robotics Team Won a Silver Medal at Their Competition"

    "*Though their robot was not a top finisher*, the Afghan team was awarded a silver medal
    for courageous achievement, officially named the Rajaa Cherkaoui El Moursli Award
    for Courageous Achievement, at the closing ceremonies – a recognition of how hard
    they had to fight just to be there. From pushing back against sexist ideas about women
    and education, to finishing the challenge despite receiving their materials later than all
    the other competitors, to traveling hundreds of miles just to apply for their visas, they
    had to work three times as hard for privileges that many of the other teams could take
    for granted. The two other teams recognized for their courageous achievement were
    South Sudan, who took the gold, and Oman, who took the bronze."

    The Afghan team received a silver medal for overcoming great obstacles to participate,
    not for its robot's technical merit. (In the past, there were no awards just for participation.)

    "Though girl competitors at the Challenge were outnumbered 830, to 209, Al Jazeera
    reports that at least five other nations were also represented by all-girl teams:
    Ghana, Jordan, Palestine, the United States, and Vanuatu."

    Such female participation from Jordan and Palestine may show the diminishing of sexism
    in some predominantly Muslim Arab societies.

    The robot competition's website shows photos of each national team (of varying sizes);
    Team Hope: 3 males (Syrian refugees)
    Afghanistan: 6 females
    Argentina: 7 males
    Australia: 3 males, 1 female
    Bangladesh: 7 males, 1 female
    Bolivia: 3 males, 1 female
    Brazil: 3 males, 1 female
    Canada: 6 males, 1 female
    Chile: 4 males, 3 females
    China: 6 males, 3 females
    Colombia: 2 males, 2 females
    Cuba: 4 males
    Egypt: 2 males, 2 females
    France: 3 males
    Germany: 2 males, 4 females
    India: 7 males
    Indonesia: 8 males
    Iran: 3 males
    Iraq: 6 males
    Ireland: 3 males, 1 female
    Israel: 5 males (including a black), 2 females
    Italy: 6 males
    Japan: 6 males, 1 female
    Jordan: 8 females (most, but not all, of whom wear hijab)
    Korea (South): 5 males
    Malaysia: 6 males, 1 female
    Mexico: 8 males, 1 female
    New Zealand, 1 male, 3 females
    Pakistan: 5 males, 1 female
    Paraguay: 5 males, 1 female
    Peru: 6 males
    Russia: 4 males
    South Africa: 5 males, 1 female
    Spain: 4 males
    Turkey: 6 males
    UK: 6 males, 2 females
    Uruguay: 5 males, 3 females
    USA: 3 females (2 whites and 1 Asian Indian)
    Venezuela: 5 males

    to be continued
  7. Zugzwang
    Joined
    08 Jun '07
    Moves
    2120
    30 Jul '17 22:154 edits
    RHP's editor timed me out before I could update (and correct) my list.
    This post corrects a few earlier errors.

    The robot competition's website shows photos of each national team (of varying sizes);
    (This is not a complete list of all 163 teams.)

    Team Hope: 3 males (Syrian refugees)
    Afghanistan: 6 females
    Albania: 4 males
    Algeria: 4 males, 3 females
    Argentina: 7 males
    Armenia: 5 males, 2 females
    Australia: 3 males, 1 female
    Austria: 2 males, 1 female
    Azerbaijan: 5 males
    Bangladesh: 7 males, 1 female
    Belarus: 5 males, 2 females
    Belgium: 7 males (1 black)
    Bolivia: 3 males, 1 female
    Bosnia: 3 males, 1 female
    Brazil: 3 males, 1 female
    Bulgaria: 4 males, 1 female
    Cambodia: 2 males, 4 females
    Canada: 6 males, 1 female
    Chile: 4 males, 3 females
    China: 6 males, 3 females
    Colombia: 2 males, 2 females
    Croatia: 2 males, 1 female
    Cuba: 4 males
    Czech Republic: 3 males
    Denmark: 4 males
    Egypt: 2 males, 2 females
    Estonia: 5 males
    Ethiopia: 6 males, 2 females
    Finland: 2 males,1 female
    France: 3 males
    Georgia: 4 males, 3 females
    Germany: 2 males, 4 females
    Ghana: 6 females
    Greece: 5 males
    Hungary: 5 males, 2 females
    India: 7 males
    Indonesia: 8 males
    Iran: 3 males
    Iraq: 6 males
    Ireland: 3 males, 1 female
    Israel: 5 males (1 black), 2 females
    Italy: 6 males
    Japan: 6 males, 1 female
    Jordan: 8 females (most, but not all, of whom wear hijab)
    Kazakhstan: 6 males, 1 female
    Kenya: 4 males
    Korea (South): 5 males
    Laos: 4 males, 1 female
    Latvia: 3 males (1 East Asian), 2 females
    Lebanon: 4 males
    Madagascar: 5 males, 1 female
    Malaysia: 6 males, 1 female
    Mexico: 8 males, 1 female
    Morocco: 4 males
    Myanmar: 7 males, ,2 females
    Nepal: 4 males, 2 females
    Netherlands: 2 males
    New Zealand, 1 male, 3 females
    Norway: 6 males, 1 female
    Pakistan: 5 males, 1 female
    Paraguay: 5 males, 1 female
    Peru: 6 males
    Portugal: 4 males
    Romania: 5 males, 2 females
    Russia: 4 males
    Singapore: 4 males
    Slovakia: 8 males
    Slovenia: 5 males
    South Africa: 5 males, 1 female
    Spain: 4 males
    Sri Lanka: 2 males, 2 females
    Sweden: 5 males, 4 females
    Tanzania: 4 males, 3 females
    Tunisia: 7 males
    Turkey: 6 males
    UK: 5 males, 1 female
    Ukraine: 2 males, 2 females
    Uruguay: 5 males, 3 females
    USA: 3 females (2 whites,1 Asian Indian)
    Uzbekistan: 3 males
    Venezuela: 5 males
    Vietnam 7 males
    Zimbabwe: 4 males, 3 females

    At first sight, this sample of data does *not* show consistently greater female participation
    in (supposedly less sexist) western European societies than in the rest o the world.
    Many feminists contend that sexist barriers remain in high technology sectors even after
    they have been lowered in other ways.
  8. Joined
    12 Jul '08
    Moves
    12091
    30 Jul '17 23:142 edits
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    RHP's editor timed me out before I could update (and correct) my list.
    This post corrects a few earlier errors.

    The robot competition's website shows photos of each national team (of varying sizes);
    (This is not a complete list of all 163 teams.)

    Team Hope: 3 males (Syrian refugees)
    Afghanistan: 6 females
    Albania: 4 males
    Algeria: 4 males, 3 fe ...[text shortened]... ist barriers remain in high technology sectors even after
    they have been lowered in other ways.
    As long as they continue to hand out awards to girls who do not actually earn it, the sexist barrier will continue.

    After all, why would females need an inferior standard if females are not inherently inferior?
  9. Zugzwang
    Joined
    08 Jun '07
    Moves
    2120
    30 Jul '17 23:401 edit
    Originally posted by @eladar
    As long as they continue to hand out awards to girls who do not actually earn it, the sexist barrier will continue.
    After all, why would females need an inferior standard if females are not inherently inferior?
    The sexist troll Eladar wrongly implies that the team from Afghanistan was unfairly
    'rewarded' because all its members are female. In fact, the Afghans received a silver
    medal for overcoming great obstacles (partly related to being female) to participate.
    If the Afghans had an all-male team, which the US government also had attempted to ban,
    then they might well still have received a medal for 'courageous achievement'.

    I note that the Afghans did not receive the gold medal for 'courageous achievement',
    which went to (war-torn) South Sudan, a team of three males and two females.
    The bronze medal went to Oman, a team of six males. There's no evidence of any
    anti-male sexist bias in these awards.

    Now people may have philosophical differences about whether awards should be given
    just for participation. (When I was growing up, I expected no awards just for participation.)
    But *when* such awards are given, they should be given fairly. And the evidence shows
    that there was no sexist bias in giving these awards for 'courageous achievement'.

    Eladar's wrong in implying that this is another case of how males are being oppressed.
  10. Joined
    12 Jul '08
    Moves
    12091
    30 Jul '17 23:43
    If females are given a lower standard to achieve, it just goes to show females are in fact inferior.
  11. Zugzwang
    Joined
    08 Jun '07
    Moves
    2120
    31 Jul '17 03:411 edit
    Originally posted by @eladar
    If females are given a lower standard to achieve, it just goes to show females are in fact inferior.
    There's no evidence of any different standards for males and females.
    In spewing his misogyny, Eladar shows that he's too idiotic to
    comprehend the distinction between awards for technical achievement
    and those for overcoming great adversity to participate.
  12. Joined
    12 Jul '08
    Moves
    12091
    31 Jul '17 04:12
    Originally posted by @duchess64
    There's no evidence of any different standards for males and females.
    In spewing his misogyny, Eladar shows that he's too idiotic to
    comprehend the distinction between awards for technical achievement
    and those for overcoming great adversity to participate.
    Face it, if they weren't girls they would not have gotten the award.

    We need to either admit women are inferior when it comes to the contest or make them compete under the same conditions with the guys. No special treatment.

    This applies to all areas in life.
  13. Joined
    11 Nov '05
    Moves
    43938
    31 Jul '17 08:05
    I would lift more than one eyebrow if the women were from USA or Sweden if they'd won a special award only because they are women.

    But these are from Afganistan, Oman, and Sudan, where it is a big risque just to enter a school for girls. Meaning that takes great courage to even enter the competition. Go, girls, go!

    They will be a good raw model for other women in their countries showing that women can be equal men and they are the proof for just this. They will make a difference for women in their countries!

    I'm happy for them and I wish them good luck in their future.
  14. Joined
    12 Jul '08
    Moves
    12091
    31 Jul '17 10:13
    Originally posted by @fabianfnas
    I would lift more than one eyebrow if the women were from USA or Sweden if they'd won a special award only because they are women.

    But these are from Afganistan, Oman, and Sudan, where it is a big risque just to enter a school for girls. Meaning that takes great courage to even enter the competition. Go, girls, go!

    They will be a good raw model for ...[text shortened]... e for women in their countries!

    I'm happy for them and I wish them good luck in their future.
    So you are saying it is a social justice award given at what is supposed to be a robotics event.

    Special people get special treatment. So is the way of the liberal.
  15. Joined
    11 Nov '05
    Moves
    43938
    31 Jul '17 10:56
    Originally posted by @eladar
    So you are saying it is a social justice award given at what is supposed to be a robotics event.

    Special people get special treatment. So is the way of the liberal.
    Yes, pretty much. If you call it liberal (I'm not), then okay.
Back to Top