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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    24 Oct '09 13:32
    As I said in another thread, the move for privatization and deregulation is, at its heart, about transferring the very business of government from the public sphere and democratically elected institutions to the private sphere with no public accountability.

    It isn't just certain industries or services that are being privatized, it is the very sphere of government itself. Core functions which are thought to be the sole responsibility of government, like defense, national security and disaster relief, are increasingly being privatized. The strategy of the right wingers has been to hollow out government to the point where its sole function will be the awarding of contracts to private firms and maintaining the flow of public money to private institutions. As we slide deeper and deeper into this non-democratic corporatocracy, public democratically elected institutions will become increasingly marginalized and powerless. Either that or, with the continual revolving door between the corporate world and government institutions, they will become mere rubber stamp assemblies for corporate desires. Either way, political democracy itself will become a hollow concept.

    If ever there was a blueprint leading straight toward Big Brother, the entanglement of the corporate sphere with government is it.
  2. 24 Oct '09 13:49 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by rwingett
    As I said in another thread, the move for privatization and deregulation is, at its heart, about transferring the very business of government from the public sphere and democratically elected institutions to the private sphere with no public accountability.

    It isn't just certain industries or services that are being privatized, it is the very sphere of ...[text shortened]... ng straight toward Big Brother, the entanglement of the corporate sphere with government is it.
    We both see the same thing happening, which is the etermination of the middle class and the average Joe and a move towards ever increasing tyranny, however, where we disagree is the root cause. I contend that at the core is the two party system, which varies little in their goals which is ever increasing power. The monopoly of the two party system and their collusion with big corporate America is an undeniable recipe for an elitist ruling class. Hide behind the notion that government is more righteous than the corporate world because we can "vote" for them all you want, but just ask yourself, did this democratic process elect Obama within his own party? In addition, are these political figures mere empty suites defending the party line on issues? In fact, what are the major differences even between the parties? Are not Obama and Bush similar in their actions? No doubt, the American public will grow sick and tired of Obama just as they did Bush, but whom will they run to? If you don't believe me, just look at Obama's approval numbers which has taken a breath taking swan dive.
  3. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    24 Oct '09 14:08
    Originally posted by whodey
    We both see the same thing happening, which is the etermination of the middle class and the average Joe and a move towards ever increasing tyranny, however, where we disagree is the root cause. I contend that at the core is the two party system, which varies little in their goals which is ever increasing power. The monopoly of the two party system and their ...[text shortened]... believe me, just look at Obama's approval numbers which has taken a breath taking swan dive.
    Politicians defend corporate interests because it's the corporations who pay for their elections. The way out of that is to eliminate all political contributions and make all elections publicly funded. The politicians will answer solely to the voters and not to their paymasters.

    I agree the two party system is a bad thing. I have previously advocated plans to make elections to the House of Representatives based on proportional representation, which would allow for much greater minor party participation.
  4. Subscriber Wajoma
    Die Cheeseburger
    24 Oct '09 14:18
    "When buying and selling are controlled by legislation, the first things to be bought and sold are legislators."
    P. J. O'Rourke
  5. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    24 Oct '09 14:33
    Originally posted by Wajoma
    "When buying and selling are controlled by legislation, the first things to be bought and sold are legislators."
    P. J. O'Rourke
    What?!? Legislators are openly bought and sold now, as commodities in a "free" market.
  6. Subscriber Wajoma
    Die Cheeseburger
    24 Oct '09 14:37
    Originally posted by rwingett
    What?!? Legislators are openly bought and sold now, as commodities in a "free" market.
    You don't see what you just wrote?

    If it were a free market there would be no legislation then the legislators would not be able to sell themselves.
  7. 24 Oct '09 14:38
    Originally posted by rwingett
    What?!? Legislators are openly bought and sold now, as commodities in a "free" market.
    don't you understand what he meant by that quote?
  8. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    24 Oct '09 14:43
    Originally posted by Wajoma
    You don't see what you just wrote?

    If it were a free market there would be no legislation then the legislators would not be able to sell themselves.
    That "free" market would equal the death of political democracy. You would only have as much "freedom" as you could afford to pay for.
  9. Subscriber Wajoma
    Die Cheeseburger
    24 Oct '09 14:46
    Originally posted by rwingett
    That "free" market would equal the death of political democracy. You would only have as much "freedom" as you could afford to pay for.
    But you would be free to form a collective and vote on what's for dinner, or whether to plant turnips or potatoes.
  10. 24 Oct '09 15:15
    Originally posted by rwingett
    Politicians defend corporate interests because it's the corporations who pay for their elections. The way out of that is to eliminate all political contributions and make all elections publicly funded. The politicians will answer solely to the voters and not to their paymasters.

    I agree the two party system is a bad thing. I have previously advocated pl ...[text shortened]... d on proportional representation, which would allow for much greater minor party participation.
    Good luck with that reform spanky, I"m sure both parties will get right on it!!
  11. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    24 Oct '09 16:01
    Originally posted by Wajoma
    But you would be free to form a collective and vote on what's for dinner, or whether to plant turnips or potatoes.
    In theory.
  12. 25 Oct '09 08:11
    Originally posted by Wajoma

    If it were a free market there would be no legislation
    Almost comedy!