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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Subscriber kmax87
    You've got Kevin
    15 Apr '10 01:33
    No chance, no point even bothering?
  2. 15 Apr '10 01:58
    Originally posted by kmax87
    No chance, no point even bothering?
    You tell us
  3. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    15 Apr '10 02:17
    I was under the impression that poverty was an issue of virtue in U.S. culture. Virtue breeds wealth. Wealth rewards virtue. The poor are simply who they are and what they are. Have I got it right?
  4. 15 Apr '10 02:26
    Originally posted by FMF
    I was under the impression that poverty was an issue of virtue in U.S. culture. Virtue breeds wealth. Wealth rewards virtue. The poor are simply who they are and what they are. Have I got it right?
    What?
  5. 15 Apr '10 09:07
    Originally posted by FMF
    I was under the impression that poverty was an issue of virtue in U.S. culture. Virtue breeds wealth. Wealth rewards virtue. The poor are simply who they are and what they are. Have I got it right?
    Congratulations. Everyone is who he/she is and what she he/she is. How did you come to that profound insight into human nature?
  6. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    15 Apr '10 09:22
    Originally posted by Sartor Resartus
    How did you come to that profound insight into human nature?
    Easy. I did it by operating on a completely different level to you and in so doing conjured profundity out of thin air.
  7. 15 Apr '10 09:42
    Originally posted by FMF
    Easy. I did it by operating on a completely different level to you and in so doing conjured profundity out of thin air.
    Clever Dick!
  8. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    15 Apr '10 09:53
    Originally posted by Sartor Resartus
    Clever Dick!
    If you want to start a thread about your inability to process irony, then be our guest.
  9. Standard member spruce112358
    Democracy Advocate
    15 Apr '10 19:35
    Originally posted by FMF
    I was under the impression that poverty was an issue of virtue in U.S. culture. Virtue breeds wealth. Wealth rewards virtue. The poor are simply who they are and what they are. Have I got it right?
    Not virtue -- work (i.e. satisfying a customer).

    Satisfying customers breeds wealth. Wealth rewards satisfying customers.

    The poor are those who either can't make it happen due to some sort of disability, don't understand the system, or get it but don't want to bother.

    Most Americans are willing to help out the first group quite a lot and the second group to some extent with educational programs. They are not willing to help out the third group.
  10. 15 Apr '10 20:38
    Originally posted by spruce112358
    Not virtue -- work (i.e. satisfying a customer).

    Satisfying customers breeds wealth. Wealth rewards satisfying customers.

    The poor are those who either can't make it happen due to some sort of disability, don't understand the system, or get it but don't want to bother.

    Most Americans are willing to help out the first group quite a lot and the s ...[text shortened]... p to some extent with educational programs. They are not willing to help out the third group.
    Satisfaction isn't proportional to price.
  11. Standard member spruce112358
    Democracy Advocate
    16 Apr '10 05:29
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Satisfaction isn't proportional to price.
    True. Supply and demand determine price.

    There is a loose correlation between the notion of "hard work" and reward because if something is easy work with a high reward, everyone would do it - -and then competition among suppliers would drive the reward down.

    However, hard work that satisfies no customer is not rewarded any more than easy work that satisfies no customer.

    As for virtue, "Virtue is its own reward."
  12. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    16 Apr '10 06:47
    Originally posted by spruce112358
    True. Supply and demand determine price.

    There is a loose correlation between the notion of "hard work" and reward because if something is easy work with a high reward, everyone would do it - -and then competition among suppliers would drive the reward down.

    However, hard work that satisfies no customer is not rewarded any more than easy work that satisfies no customer.

    As for virtue, "Virtue is its own reward."
    I know people who work very hard and very long hours in hotels, with very happy customers, for poor pay.
  13. 16 Apr '10 07:13
    Originally posted by spruce112358
    True. Supply and demand determine price.

    There is a loose correlation between the notion of "hard work" and reward because if something is easy work with a high reward, everyone would do it - -and then competition among suppliers would drive the reward down.

    However, hard work that satisfies no customer is not rewarded any more than easy work that satisfies no customer.

    As for virtue, "Virtue is its own reward."
    There are plenty of jobs with very easy work and very high pay. But it may not always be easy to obtain such a job.