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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 22 Aug '10 05:39
    what the heck happened in the UK Uni system?

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/7952155/Seven-students-to-fight-for-every-clearing-place.html
  2. 22 Aug '10 05:44
    oh.
  3. 22 Aug '10 05:45
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/economics/7957110/Government-urged-to-reveal-true-national-debt-of-4.8trillion.html

    The Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA) has calculated that the national debt is £4.8 trillion once state and public sector pension liabilities are included, or £78,000 for every person in the UK.
  4. 22 Aug '10 05:45
    i wonder what it is for the US?
  5. 22 Aug '10 05:51
    RBS & Trident ..... now there's a lot less money around
  6. 22 Aug '10 06:40
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    what the heck happened in the UK Uni system?

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/7952155/Seven-students-to-fight-for-every-clearing-place.html
    The former government was obsessed by the notion that every child should be given the opportunity to be educated at an establishment called a university, regardless of what subjects they intended to study and whehter or not the work required a considerable degree of theoretical or academic knowledge for its satisfactory performsance.
    As a result a multitude of non-academic courses, such as 'media studies', 'sports management', and nursing, were added to the curriculum of former technical colleges (renamed 'universities', and opening new establishments of dubious academic standing.
    This naturally led to an enormous increase in the number of applicants for a univerity place, and coincided with an ongoing policy of making it easier to obtain high marks in the qualifying 'A-level' examinations, together with the employment of persons with inferior academic attainments to mark the examination papers .
    At the same time the government would not allow the top well-established universities to increase their fees for UK students, and this forced them to increase he number of places offered to foreign students who paid considerably more for their courses of study.

    The following link elucidates the defects of the present A-level exammination. a
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/7957721/A-level-results-How-can-we-rescue-our-examination-system.html
  7. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    22 Aug '10 06:46
    I support people having the option to continue their education. I think U.K. citizens studying alongside foreign students is a good thing. I have no compunction whatsoever about overseas students paying more than their British classmates.
  8. 22 Aug '10 06:46
    Originally posted by Sartor Resartus
    The former government was obsessed by the notion that every child should be given the opportunity to be educated at an establishment called a university, regardless of what subjects they intended to study and whehter or not the work required a considerable degree of theoretical or academic knowledge for its satisfactory performsance.
    As a result a ...[text shortened]... ph.co.uk/education/7957721/A-level-results-How-can-we-rescue-our-examination-system.html
    How does the current number of applicants per year relate to, say, 15 years ago?
  9. 22 Aug '10 06:53
    Originally posted by FMF
    I support people having the option to continue their education. I think U.K. citizens studying alongside foreign students is a good thing. I have no compunction whatsoever about overseas students paying more than their British classmates.
    You miss the point of the OP,and go off at a tangent as usual. Wake up.
  10. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    22 Aug '10 06:55 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Sartor Resartus
    You miss the point of the OP,and go off at a tangent as usual.
    My reply was to your post. So if you think we are on a tangent, fair enough.

    Originally posted by Sartor Resartus
    The former government was obsessed by the notion that every child should be given the opportunity to be educated at an establishment called a university, regardless of what subjects they intended to study and whehter or not the work required a considerable degree of theoretical or academic knowledge for its satisfactory performsance.

    I support people having the option to continue their education.

    Originally posted by Sartor Resartus
    At the same time the government would not allow the top well-established universities to increase their fees for UK students, and this forced them to increase he number of places offered to foreign students who paid considerably more for their courses of study.

    I think U.K. citizens studying alongside foreign students is a good thing. I have no compunction whatsoever about overseas students paying more than their British classmates.

    There. Does that help you out a bit?
  11. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    22 Aug '10 07:09
    Originally posted by Sartor Resartus
    As a result a multitude of non-academic courses, such as 'media studies', 'sports management', and nursing, were added to the curriculum of former technical colleges (renamed 'universities', and opening new establishments of dubious academic standing.
    I think the change of terminology from 'polytechnic' to 'university' was cosmetic and of little real world relevance, except to the likes of the Colonel Blimp-ish Daily Telegraph, whose other - rather incongrous preoccupations, one would have thought - include oddly prurient coverage of rapes, and gusset shots of stretching women tennis players.

    As for the proliferation of more vocational higher education or new combinations or focusses, I applaud it. I think that the tertiary sector's efforts to embrace a wider spectrum of society and offer a wider choice of education and training options is to be applauded too.

    As for some institutions having better standing than others, that has always been the case, and always will be the case.
  12. 22 Aug '10 08:07
    Originally posted by Sartor Resartus
    The former government was obsessed by the notion that every child should be given the opportunity to be educated at an establishment called a university, regardless of what subjects they intended to study and whehter or not the work required a considerable degree of theoretical or academic knowledge for its satisfactory performsance.
    As a result a ...[text shortened]... ph.co.uk/education/7957721/A-level-results-How-can-we-rescue-our-examination-system.html
    we've got that "unusable degree" thing here, too. i think i posted an article here a while back about a girl who got her mom to cosign $100K+ in loans for a religious studies degree.
  13. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    22 Aug '10 08:11
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    we've got that "unusable degree" thing here, too. i think i posted an article here a while back about a girl who got her mom to cosign $100K+ in loans for a religious studies degree.
    What happened to 'you pays yer money and you takes yer choice'? Interesting to hear people arguing against choice and innovation in service provision based on the existence of 'losers'.
  14. 22 Aug '10 08:33
    Originally posted by FMF
    What happened to 'you pays yer money and you takes yer choice'? Interesting to hear people arguing against choice and innovation in service provision based on the existence of 'losers'.
    they could just as well have collected her money and taught her something useful.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confidence_trick
  15. 22 Aug '10 08:35
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    they could just as well have collected her money and taught her something useful.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confidence_trick
    Wouldn't that require some government meddling, though?