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  1. 28 Oct '11 00:12
    I have not seen this film but thought I would post this thread to find out what others think just for kicks.

    http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/light-bulb-conspiracy/

    Is it bunk? If so, is it worth watching just for amusement?
  2. 28 Oct '11 00:52 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Metal Brain
    I have not seen this film but thought I would post this thread to find out what others think just for kicks.

    http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/light-bulb-conspiracy/

    Is it bunk? If so, is it worth watching just for amusement?
    The premise at the beginning is somewhat strained. Ink jet printers have progressed so quickly that obsolescence doesn't need to be planned. I bought the original HP Deskjet and used it I don't remember how long, but it was really obsolete when I bought the next.

    Over time, the printers got better, the output sharper, more durable, the machines multi-function, and they got much cheaper. Today inkjet printers are built and sold to sell ink.

    I don't know how the CF bulbs fit into this notion, since they last so long that since I began using them about three years ago, I only have replaced one. Incandescent bulbs in the last few years, I would replace a dozen or so each year, perhaps more.

    One of the raps against the American auto industry is that it featured planned obsolescence. That seems to have been overturned by Japanese auto manufacturers, which forced Americans to make more durable and dependable cars.
  3. 29 Oct '11 14:17
    I finally found time to watch part of it. I got about half way through when they were talking about the i pod and how they used to not sell replacement batteries to force the consumer to buy a whole new i pod.
    I thought it was interesting how the soviet communists had products that lasted because of resource shortages. It is an interesting film from what I saw so far.
  4. 29 Oct '11 14:35
    I recommend watching a version with English captions instead of the German captions.

    http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=the+light+bulb+conspiracy&aq=f
  5. 30 Oct '11 08:10
    From the link below:

    The cartel served as a convenient way to lower costs and allegedly took on considerable efforts to cap the life expectancy of light bulbs at 1000 hours,[3] while at the same time hiking prices without fear of competition. Standardization of light bulbs was another side-effect of the cartel.

    However, 1000 hours was a reasonable optimum life expectancy for most bulbs. A longer lifetime could be obtained only at the expense of efficiency: more electricity is wasted as heat and less light is obtained.




    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoebus_cartel
  6. 31 Oct '11 19:59
    In the early 70s, my parents purchased an antique light bulb from the 1920s. It doesn't shed the best light for reading in my opinion - kind of harsh - but it lights up a room just fine. For several years we experimented by turning it on every night. They don't turn it on every night anymore, but it is still working fine.
  7. 01 Nov '11 04:43 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Kunsoo
    In the early 70s, my parents purchased an antique light bulb from the 1920s. It doesn't shed the best light for reading in my opinion - kind of harsh - but it lights up a room just fine. For several years we experimented by turning it on every night. They don't turn it on every night anymore, but it is still working fine.
    I wonder how much less efficient the long life incandescent bulbs are. I tried to find out and stumbled on to this link.

    http://www.environmentalleader.com/2008/12/01/ge-suspends-development-of-high-efficiency-incandescent-bulbs/

    It is kind of funny because this just brings up questions of possible suppression of technology. LOL!
    I'm not saying I buy into all of the stuff the film says about a light bulb conspiracy, but new questions do seem to pop up in an amusing way. For example, are cartels good? The wikipedia link indicates good things resulted from the light bulb cartel. Are the Libertarians right about a policy of no antitrust laws?

    Maybe I should start another thread called " are cartels good, competition bad?". I suppose it depends. Compatibility can change things so maybe that could be a good debate. When are monopolies good? More or less harm than good?
  8. Subscriber WoodPush
    Pusher of wood
    01 Nov '11 17:14
    Its sort of a sad statement that many consumers will throw away perfectly good items because a minor part like a light bulb breaks.

    I travel every so often and I'm always struck how this is NOT the case everywhere in the world. Go to Hong Kong's electronics market for example, and you can get virtually anything fixed. There are stands with guys fixing broken cell phones, broken computers.. There's a guy who's been there like 40 years with a stack of old room fans, just fixing fans for people.

    Planned obsolescence wouldn't be a problem if we weren't so eager to have excuses to "fix" things by "upgrading" them.

    Not that I'm not guilty myself...