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Debates Forum

  1. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    27 Aug '11 12:37
    What do people think about this business of mandatory evacuations in a situation like the one Hurricane Irene has created?

    What happens to people who refuse to be ordered out of their dwellings?

    Are rescue services still expected to risk their lives to save people who stay put?

    Are "mandatory evacuation" powers ever raised as evidence of the 'nanny state'?
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    27 Aug '11 16:25
    This sort of thing came up in New Orleans I think. Basically if you don't leave you're on your own I think.
  3. 27 Aug '11 16:43
    Originally posted by FMF
    What do people think about this business of mandatory evacuations in a situation like the one Hurricane Irene has created?

    What happens to people who refuse to be ordered out of their dwellings?

    Are rescue services still expected to risk their lives to save people who stay put?

    Are "mandatory evacuation" powers ever raised as evidence of the 'nanny state'?
    This link discusses some of your concerns.

    http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/25/4/958.full

    "Penalties for refusal. Although not necessarily less resource-intensive, various types of pressures or burdens have also been placed on those who refuse to leave. Local police have often asked those who refuse to evacuate for contact information for next of kin to impress on them the gravity of the risk they were assuming.36 Some legal scholars have recommended this as a more practicable and effective use of police authority.37 Other tactics involve levying financial penalties on people who refuse to obey a mandatory order. North Carolina, for example, holds people who ignore a disaster warning and then must be rescued civilly liable for the costs.38 Most states also specify that violations of the emergency statute are misdemeanors. But there are practical and ethical questions as to whether people should be arrested for failure to evacuate.39 Even when the law allows citizens to be held liable for the costs of rescue efforts, it is not ethically permissible to consider enforcing this measure unless citizens have been fully informed of the consequences of their actions. "

    I also found some mention of the state being able to forcibly remove minors. The parents/guardians who refused to evacuate their children could be charged with child endangerment which at least in California could be charged as a felony with imprisonment for two, four, or six years.
  4. 28 Aug '11 04:14 / 1 edit
    Most often, in lieu of punishment, authorities are content to let natural selection kick in.
  5. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    28 Aug '11 04:28
    The Phillipines have been hit by a super typhoon too.
  6. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    28 Aug '11 16:19
    'Mandatory evacuations' sounds just like something on the schedule of a care institution in a nanny state.
  7. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    28 Aug '11 18:25
    Vaccuum cleaner?
  8. Standard member Bosse de Nage
    Zellulärer Automat
    28 Aug '11 18:52
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    The Phillipines have been hit by a super typhoon too.
    Nanmadol. Over the counter or prescription?
  9. 28 Aug '11 20:02
    What happens to people who refuse to be ordered out of their dwellings?

    some die I suppose, others get a jump on repairing their places, it's all a gamble, but many things in life are.....
    we still have people climbing Mt Hood on New years day, and expecting rescue teams to save them....
  10. 28 Aug '11 20:03 / 1 edit
    Are "mandatory evacuation" powers ever raised as evidence of the 'nanny state'?

    They can not force anyone to leave their homes...
    how many people ignored the warnings when Mt. St. helens blew it's top?
  11. 30 Aug '11 00:06
    Originally posted by Hugh Glass
    Are "mandatory evacuation" powers ever raised as evidence of the 'nanny state'?

    They can not force anyone to leave their homes...
    how many people ignored the warnings when Mt. St. helens blew it's top?
    1. He's dead.
  12. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    30 Aug '11 18:55
    Originally posted by FMF
    What do people think about this business of mandatory evacuations in a situation like the one Hurricane Irene has created?

    What happens to people who refuse to be ordered out of their dwellings?

    Are rescue services still expected to risk their lives to save people who stay put?

    Are "mandatory evacuation" powers ever raised as evidence of the 'nanny state'?
    It's an overblown issue. I don't see people being carted off to prison in chains if they choose to ride out a storm in there home. From what I've been reading, many of them had sex during the storm (not a bad idea actually!)
  13. 31 Aug '11 02:12
    Originally posted by Kunsoo
    1. He's dead.
    who?
  14. 31 Aug '11 05:07 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Hugh Glass
    who?
    The old guy who refused to leave his home as evacuation personnel were risking their lives to beg him to leave when pressure was building in the mountain. He died, and one scientist who stayed too long. I don't think there were more than two deaths.
  15. 31 Aug '11 05:09
    I take that back. 57 people were killed.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_St._Helens