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  1. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    03 Jul '10 13:47
    Investigative journalist Mark Curtis had done it again. Going through some declassified British documents he has unearthed some gritty details about Britain's dealings with terrorists groups and countries that support them.

    In the good and usual way of Imperialism what the British government has chose to do was to give them cover, help them over throw governments, and secure oil resources.

    Yes, that's the War on Terror for you simpletons out there: you have to collude with terrorists and then send your national youth to die in another countries and maim the indigenous population.


    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Secret-Affairs-Britains-Collusion-Radical/dp/1846687632
    In his ground-breaking new book, Mark Curtis reveals the secret history of British collusion with radical Islamic and terrorist groups. It shows how Labour and Conservative governments have connived with militant groups linked to al-Qaida to control oil resources, overthrow governments and promote Britain’s financial interests. The current terrorist threat to Britain is partly ‘blowback’.

    The story of how Britain has helped to nurture the rise of global terrorism has never been told. Secret Affairs reveals how Britain has covertly supported radical Islamic groups in Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Libya, the Balkans, Syria, Indonesia and Egypt. Drawing on declassified government files, it documents Britain’s hidden strategic alliance with the two major state sponsors of radical Islam – Saudi Arabia and Pakistan. And it shows how British policies of ‘divide of rule’ – rooted in the Empire – have used Islamic forces to promote imperial interests in India, Palestine, Jordan and Yemen. Similar British policies continue today in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

    Mark Curtis shows how British collusion with radical Islam is intimately related to its postwar imperial decline. Expedient and pragmatic, and lacking any moral compass, policy-makers have aimed to counter popular, nationalist forces in a desperate attempt to uphold their power in a changing world.


    http://www.newleftproject.org/index.php/site/article_comments/colluding_with_extremists/

    Can you tell us what your new book - ‘Secret affairs: Britain’s collusion with radical Islam’ is about. What do you want to convey? What are your hopes for the book?

    The book tells the story of the long history of British collaboration with radical Islam, including terrorist groups. 7/7 and the present broader terrorist threat to Britain is to some degree a product of British foreign policy – the bombings derived from a terrorism infrastructure established by a Pakistani state long backed by Whitehall and involving Pakistani terrorist groups which had benefitted from past British covert action. Throughout the postwar period Britain has covertly supported radical Islamic groups in Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Libya, the Balkans, Syria, Indonesia and Egypt, and the book aims to documents this drawing on the declassified British files.


    Of course such expositions will merit very little attention form the media, scorn by the very few of the enlightened elite that will actually read the book, derision by the larger part of the enlightened elite that won't read the book but will comment on it based on another people commentaries (most of which won't read the book also), and rationalization by the gang of usual suspects that consider themselves to be part of the broader intelligentsia but can only parrot, with little modification, what the media tells them to think.
  2. Standard member DrKF
    incipit parodia
    03 Jul '10 14:57
    By coincidence, I was re-watching Adam Curtis' documentary The Power of Nightmares the other week: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_power_of_nightmares

    You should definitely check that out.
  3. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    03 Jul '10 15:37
    Originally posted by DrKF
    By coincidence, I was re-watching Adam Curtis' documentary The Power of Nightmares the other week: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_power_of_nightmares

    You should definitely check that out.
    Already did, my dear. As it came out!

    But my favorite one from Adam Curtis is the Century of the Self. After that one I think it is Pandora's Box.
  4. Standard member DrKF
    incipit parodia
    03 Jul '10 15:47 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by adam warlock
    Already did, my dear. As it came out!

    But my favorite one from Adam Curtis is the Century of the Self. After that one I think it is Pandora's Box.
    Agreed that CotS is his best work, although it seems unfair to miss out The Trap. I didn't get to see his installation thing, but have seen the film of it (It felt like a kiss - which was much more impressionistic, without the constant narration. More of a curiosity/indulgence compared to the documentaries, but it did highlight the sheer amount of effort involved in putting together the documentaries. The sheer amount of time he/his researchers must spend sifting through archive footage - before they even start editing it - is mind-boggling. (Did you know... he cut his journalistic teeth working on, of all things, That's Life with Esther Rantzen?)
  5. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    03 Jul '10 15:59
    Originally posted by DrKF
    Agreed that CotS is his best work, although it seems unfair to miss out The Trap. I didn't get to see his installation thing, but have seen the film of it (It felt like a kiss - which was much more impressionistic, without the constant narration. More of a curiosity/indulgence compared to the documentaries, but it did highlight the sheer am ...[text shortened]... cut his journalistic teeth working on, of all things, That's Life with Esther Rantzen?)
    To tell you the truth I didn't see The Trap with that much attention, I think that most of it was already in Pandora's Box anyway, but I think that Adam Curtis documentaries are out of this world.

    His critique and analysis on the deification of mathematics in current day "scientific" approach in the social sciences is very good on my opinion.

    By the way this book Descartes' Dream: The World According to Mathematics also touches on these topics, from two mathematicians perspective and I find it to be a very good effort. If you have the time and inclination for this kind of things give it a try.

    I think he does most (if not all of the research) himself. The amount of surprising things he is able to discover is just awesome.

    I'll google That's Life and Esther Rantzen to see if that's a good thing or a bad thing.

    Ps: I'll Watch The Trap with more care today.