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  1. 24 May '15 22:27 / 1 edit
    http://nypost.com/2015/05/24/no-pay-no-play-kids-who-cant-pay-10-fee-banned-from-school-carnival

    New York City's PS (public school) 120 held a carnival that was attended by nearly 900 children.
    But more than 100 children from poor families (mostly Chinese immigrants) were excluded
    because their families were unable or unwilling to pay 10 USD each. Given that the school
    made a significant profit by charging 10 USD for admission, the amount charged exceeded the cost.

    In some other societies, it would be unacceptable to implement such stark discrimination
    among children upon the basis of economic class. Most Americans tend to admire cultural
    practices, however, that celebrate the many advantages that the rich have over the poor.
    So how far should this principle be extended? Should a teacher make a point of giving
    more attention to students from rich families than from poor families? If the students are
    assigned to help clean up the classroom, for instance, should the students from rich families
    be exempt from such menial labor and be assigned instead to supervise the other students?
    Or should the highest grades simply be put up for auction, going to the students whose
    families are ready to bid the most money for them?
  2. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    25 May '15 03:16
    In some other societies, it would be unacceptable to implement such stark discrimination
    among children upon the basis of economic class.

    Sadly, America is not "some other society" America's motto is generally "pay, or go without"
  3. 25 May '15 11:50
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    Given that the school made a significant profit by charging 10 USD for admission, the amount charged exceeded the cost.
    Was this a fundraising exercise? If so, then it make sense to try and get people to pay. However, here in SA, I think that most schools would make exceptions for children who could prove that they could not afford it.
    The schools my son has been to all had a policy with school fees where the poorest parents are exempted and the rest of the parents essentially pay for the poorest. The government also contributes some.
  4. 25 May '15 12:04
    This sort of thing was pretty common at my high school. Of course, there aren't as many poor people where I am from.
  5. 25 May '15 23:26 / 2 edits
    Oh hell.
    After school social function that is voluntary and costs a few bucks for people that want to go , people want to cry that it's discrimination.
    Just never ends does it?
    They get free breakfast and lunch if they are poor, what more do they want?
    I suppose next they'll want free graduation year books because they can't afford them.
  6. 26 May '15 00:01 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    http://nypost.com/2015/05/24/no-pay-no-play-kids-who-cant-pay-10-fee-banned-from-school-carnival

    New York City's PS (public school) 120 held a carnival that was attended by nearly 900 children.
    But more than 100 children from poor families (mostly Chinese immigrants) were excluded
    because their families were unable or unwilling to pay 10 USD each. ...[text shortened]... up for auction, going to the students whose
    families are ready to bid the most money for them?
    Progressives don't much like Asians.

    FDR locked them up during WW 2 and I think there is a general resentment by Progs that Asian Americans tend to do well in school and are affluent despite being a minority.

    Hell, they don't even whine about getting nuked twice by the US and then nuking themselves in Japan.

    Also, in Progressive Hollywood you will never find a famous Asian actor, unless they fit some stereotype like Bruce Lee.
  7. 26 May '15 02:24
    Headline is misleading they weren't banned from anything.
    Don't have the money to go to something then you can't go, that's not being banned.
    Love the word games libtards play.
  8. 26 May '15 09:41
    Originally posted by FishHead111
    Headline is misleading they weren't banned from anything.
    Don't have the money to go to something then you can't go, that's not being banned.
    Love the word games libtards play.
    This problem is more about whether or not children should be treated differently during school hour activities just because their parents, to no fault of the children themselves, can't pay for those activities. This is tantamount to child abuse in my view. Those children have no concept of economics or why they should have to sit inside and listen to their class mates playing and enjoying themselves outside. It really is sickening.
  9. 26 May '15 10:16
    Originally posted by C Hess
    This problem is more about whether or not children should be treated differently during school hour activities just because their parents, to no fault of the children themselves, can't pay for those activities. This is tantamount to child abuse in my view. Those children have no concept of economics or why they should have to sit inside and listen to their class mates playing and enjoying themselves outside. It really is sickening.
    Yeah I just read the article, I thought it was an after school affair.
    You're right it was a pretty crummy thing to do.
  10. 26 May '15 16:35
    Originally posted by Duchess64
    http://nypost.com/2015/05/24/no-pay-no-play-kids-who-cant-pay-10-fee-banned-from-school-carnival

    New York City's PS (public school) 120 held a carnival that was attended by nearly 900 children.
    But more than 100 children from poor families (mostly Chinese immigrants) were excluded
    because their families were unable or unwilling to pay 10 USD each. ...[text shortened]... up for auction, going to the students whose
    families are ready to bid the most money for them?
    My daughter pays more than that for each sport my grandchildren participate in.
  11. 26 May '15 16:36
    Originally posted by C Hess
    This problem is more about whether or not children should be treated differently during school hour activities just because their parents, to no fault of the children themselves, can't pay for those activities. This is tantamount to child abuse in my view. Those children have no concept of economics or why they should have to sit inside and listen to their class mates playing and enjoying themselves outside. It really is sickening.
    Detroit public schools have been requiring parents to send paper and pencils to school with their kids for decades.
  12. 26 May '15 17:32
    Originally posted by normbenign
    Detroit public schools have been requiring parents to send paper and pencils to school with their kids for decades.
    What about books?
  13. 26 May '15 19:41
    Originally posted by twhitehead
    Was this a fundraising exercise? If so, then it make sense to try and get people to pay. However, here in SA, I think that most schools would make exceptions for children who could prove that they could not afford it.
    The schools my son has been to all had a policy with school fees where the poorest parents are exempted and the rest of the parents essentially pay for the poorest. The government also contributes some.
    "...make exceptions for children who could prove that they could not afford it."
    --Twhitehead

    "Prov(ing) that they could not afford it" should be done discreetly, if it's to be done at all.
    Few children or their parents would want to be identified--if not also stigmatized--in public
    as being too poor to join in a normal activity (during school hours) of the other children.
  14. 26 May '15 20:34
    Originally posted by FishHead111
    Headline is misleading they weren't banned from anything.
    Don't have the money to go to something then you can't go, that's not being banned.
    Love the word games libtards play.
    The 'New York Post' is far from being a 'liberal' American newspaper.

    1) PS 120 is a public school, not a private school.
    2) The carnival was held by the school during normal school hours.
  15. 26 May '15 21:32
    Originally posted by C Hess
    What about books?
    They charge for books too, if the child wants to take it home.