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Debates Forum

  1. 28 Jan '15 19:21
    Given the present stance Russia seems to have on the Ukraine and its destabilization, does anyone else have any concerns? Or am I being paranoid?
  2. 30 Jan '15 21:36
    Originally posted by OdBod
    Given the present stance Russia seems to have on the Ukraine and its destabilization, does anyone else have any concerns? Or am I being paranoid?
    No, you are not being paranoid...
  3. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    31 Jan '15 03:26
    Originally posted by OdBod
    Given the present stance Russia seems to have on the Ukraine and its destabilization, does anyone else have any concerns? Or am I being paranoid?
    A few concerns, but not many. At the rate the Russian economy is shrinking, I'd say Putin won't be able to afford to play "cold war" much longer.
  4. 31 Jan '15 09:56
    Originally posted by bill718
    A few concerns, but not many. At the rate the Russian economy is shrinking, I'd say Putin won't be able to afford to play "cold war" much longer.
    You're mixing up your post- and your neo-Stalinists.

    The post-Stalinist Soviet presidents played cold war.

    The neo-Stalinist Putin plays hot war. This is a lot more dangerous.

    But I'd say the danger is Putin himself, not what he may or may not do with the bottom-feeders in Pyongyang.
  5. 31 Jan '15 10:06
    Originally posted by OdBod
    Given the present stance Russia seems to have on the Ukraine and its destabilization, does anyone else have any concerns? Or am I being paranoid?
    What are your "concerns" specifically?
  6. 31 Jan '15 14:44
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    What are your lict"concerns" specifically?
    Russia could pursue an aggressive foreign policy by proxy, not new of course, but North Korea is a loose cannon and who can predict what they might do if they think that Russia [and China?] might support them. The Chinese economy is slowing down, possible social problems? Russian economy under pressure. Nothing like a good conflict to act as a distraction!
  7. 31 Jan '15 17:25
    Originally posted by OdBod
    Russia could pursue an aggressive foreign policy by proxy, not new of course, but North Korea is a loose cannon and who can predict what they might do if they think that Russia [and China?] might support them. The Chinese economy is slowing down, possible social problems? Russian economy under pressure. Nothing like a good conflict to act as a distraction!
    Who would North Korea be aggressive towards and how would Putin's Russia gain from this?

    The Chinese economy is still growing strongly.
  8. 31 Jan '15 17:52
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Who would North Korea be aggressive towards and how would Putin's Russia gain from this?

    The Chinese economy is still growing strongly.
    Nobody gives a shet about the Chinese economy weener boy because with 4 times the population of the US they just finally equaled it, like that's some big deal.
  9. 31 Jan '15 18:15
    Originally posted by FishHead111
    Nobody gives a shet about the Chinese economy weener boy because with 4 times the population of the US they just finally equaled it, like that's some big deal.
    Evidently OdBod, to whom I was writing a response, does care about the Chinese economy.
  10. 31 Jan '15 19:08
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Who would North Korea be aggressive towards and how would Putin's Russia gain from this?

    The Chinese economy is still growing strongly.
    North Korea has shown continued aggression toward South Korea both politically and militarily. Additionally my money is on North Korea being behind the recent much publicised cyber attack in the US. Putin could cast himself as a peace maker exacting economic concessions for his help, thereby reducing the cost of his Ukrainian move. A serious conflict in Korea would certainly destabilise the World economy, sanctions would be harder to maintain on Russia. The Chinese economy is slowing down, when the various economic bubbles start to burst [ which ALWAYS happens], what will be the outcome given there is unlikely to be any peaceful change?
  11. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    31 Jan '15 21:55
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    You're mixing up your post- and your neo-Stalinists.

    The post-Stalinist Soviet presidents played cold war.

    The neo-Stalinist Putin plays hot war. This is a lot more dangerous.

    But I'd say the danger is Putin himself, not what he may or may not do with the bottom-feeders in Pyongyang.
    Proxy wars are part of the Cold War formula. Russia is not directly involved in Syria or Ukraine.
  12. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Poor Filipov :,(
    31 Jan '15 21:57
    Originally posted by OdBod
    North Korea has shown continued aggression toward South Korea both politically and militarily. Additionally my money is on North Korea being behind the recent much publicised cyber attack in the US. Putin could cast himself as a peace maker exacting economic concessions for his help, thereby reducing the cost of his Ukrainian move. A serious conflict in Korea ...[text shortened]... ich ALWAYS happens], what will be the outcome given there is unlikely to be any peaceful change?
    The West won the first Cold War and fighting in Korea was a part of that victory.
  13. 01 Feb '15 09:49
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Proxy wars are part of the Cold War formula. Russia is not directly involved in Syria or Ukraine.
    I think you've been watching Russia Today a bit too much.
  14. Subscriber Wajoma
    Die Cheeseburger
    01 Feb '15 09:58 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    I think you've been watching Russia Today a bit too much.
    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/09/20/up-to-a-point-watching-enemy-television.html

    For some early P J O'Rourke check the second post in the "New US Census Catergory' thread.
  15. 01 Feb '15 13:28
    Originally posted by AThousandYoung
    Proxy wars are part of the Cold War formula. Russia is not directly involved in Syria or Ukraine.
    If you think Russia is not directly involved in the invasion of Ukraine, I have this bridge to sell you. A true classic, right in the middle of New York city, only $20 million - delivery on receipt of cash.