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Debates Forum

  1. 26 Nov '12 10:07
    Feeling the heat after he said he would cut employees’ hours because he could’t afford the costs of health insurance, Papa John’s CEO and multimillionaire John Schnatter wrote an op-ed in The Huffington Post “suggesting” that his intentions regarding the implementation of The Affordable Health Care Act (Obamacare) for Papa John’s employees was all a misunderstanding. He now plans to provide health care benefits to all of his corporate employees along with all employees working in his company-owned stores.

    Wrote Schnatter

    Papa John’s, like most businesses, is still researching what the Affordable Care Act means to our operations. Regardless of the conclusion of our analysis, we will honor this law, as we do all laws, and continue to offer 100% of Papa John’s corporate employees and workers in company-owned stores health insurance as we have since the company was founded in 1984.

    Good news if true. For both his employees and his business, considering the ongoing boycott. But I for one will wait to see what happens before and what his franchises do, including Peyton Manning, who owns 21 Papa John’s locations. We'll see if they announce their intention to provide health insurance to 100 percent of the employees in their respective pizza operations before I call this a true victory.

    But it is nice to see Schnatter feel the heat and that real Americans, ones who care about their fellow citizens, were able to stand up and make him take notice over his ivy-covered mansion walls.

    Choke on that pizza GOP, Tea Party and Breitbart loons.

    http://www.opposingviews.com/i/money/jobs-and-careers/papa-johns-backs-down-will-honor-obamacare

    To see the actual article that the CEO Schnatter wrote in response and clarification, see the link http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-h-schnatter/papa-johns-obamacare_b_2166209.html
  2. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    26 Nov '12 10:30
    Originally posted by moon1969
    [quote]Feeling the heat after he said he would cut employees’ hours because he could’t afford the costs of health insurance, Papa John’s CEO and multimillionaire John Schnatter wrote an op-ed in The Huffington Post “suggesting” that his intentions regarding the implementation of The Affordable Health Care Act (Obamacare) for Papa John’s employees was all a ...[text shortened]... see the link http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-h-schnatter/papa-johns-obamacare_b_2166209.html
    So much for Schnatter's vindictive partisan political statement, and a fine testament to the power that ordinary people possess when they band together to call out a corporate injustice.
  3. Subscriber WoodPush
    Pusher of wood
    26 Nov '12 16:48
    Are you reading the same article? Because the one I'm reading at

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-h-schnatter/papa-johns-obamacare_b_2166209.html

    Sure makes it seem like he's "backing down" but acknowledging that papa john's franchises are all going to be cutting hours to avoid ACT.

    Put another way, he's washing his own hands clean while pretty much making it clear that franchise employees will have their hours cut, and he'll do nothing to stop that. Doesn't exactly sound like backing down to me. It sounds like spin.
  4. Standard member sasquatch672
    Don't Like It Leave
    26 Nov '12 18:41 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by moon1969
    [quote]Feeling the heat after he said he would cut employees’ hours because he could’t afford the costs of health insurance, Papa John’s CEO and multimillionaire John Schnatter wrote an op-ed in The Huffington Post “suggesting” that his intentions regarding the implementation of The Affordable Health Care Act (Obamacare) for Papa John’s employees was all a see the link http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-h-schnatter/papa-johns-obamacare_b_2166209.html
    You're such a smacked ass. Because you yourself are mean and low, you can't imagine that people who don't think the way you do are not. All of my brothers-in-law would be able to get health benefits with a well-crafted law. You think I want to see their hours cut and have them sick and unable to afford health care? Why would I want that? Because I like to see people suffer? You need to get your head right. You are one seriously screwed up individual.

    Obamacare was a poorly crafted law. In the extreme. It gives me no glee to see America and Americans suffer at the hands of a dilletante, amateur president (Woodward's words, not mine). That you would imply that illuminates your values and state of mind, not mine.

    EDIT: And I post about Obamacare and the other follies of this poor President because they're illustrative in explaining precisely why he is the wrong man for the times: this buffoon is holding a gun to the head of the entire nation, and is willing to inflict severe and lasting damage on Democrats and Republicans alike, in every corner of the nation, for an amount of money that would run the government for forty-five days. He is a buffoon, and you are a fool.
  5. 26 Nov '12 23:04
    Originally posted by sasquatch672
    You're such a smacked ass. Because you yourself are mean and low, you can't imagine that people who don't think the way you do are not. All of my brothers-in-law would be able to get health benefits with a well-crafted law. You think I want to see their hours cut and have them sick and unable to afford health care? Why would I want that? Because I ...[text shortened]... ey that would run the government for forty-five days. He is a buffoon, and you are a fool.
    Your characterization is so wrong. And your alleged knowledge of real world and practical implications is actually nonexistent and outright biased and delusional.
  6. Standard member Soothfast
    0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,
    26 Nov '12 23:31 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by sasquatch672
    Obamacare was a poorly crafted law. In the extreme.
    Well, Republicans had 8 years under Bush to propose comprehensive health care reform of their own, and they did absolutely nothing. In 2010 they had every opportunity to participate in the development of the PPACA, but they pissed it away by cravenly caving to tea-bagger hysteria and using every possible parliamentary maneuver to try to block the process. Republicans have therefore forfeited their right to bitch about the legislation that did manage to pass in spite of them. If they had a better plan they should have put it on the table instead of knocking the table over and having a hissy fit. To this day they mindlessly chant their mantra "Repeal and replace," but have yet to offer any indication of what they would replace the PPACA with.
  7. Standard member sasquatch672
    Don't Like It Leave
    27 Nov '12 18:56
    Originally posted by moon1969
    Your characterization is so wrong. And your alleged knowledge of real world and practical implications is actually nonexistent and outright biased and delusional.
    Really? Because I actually live in the world, and I see the real-world effects of policies put in place by dilletantes. It's a bad moon rising when a society scorns success, yet that's exactly what you and your ilk do. What do you do for a living? My guess is something far removed from the rough-and-tumble.
  8. 27 Nov '12 19:51 / 12 edits
    Originally posted by sasquatch672
    Really? Because I actually live in the world, and I see the real-world effects of policies put in place by dilletantes. It's a bad moon rising when a society scorns success, yet that's exactly what you and your ilk do. What do you do for a living? My guess is something far removed from the rough-and-tumble.
    You know what I do. I have helped make and deliver a lot of products and services, and paid massive taxes. Managed and hired people. Trained and mentored people, Bridged communication and cooperation between company divisions including those in different countries (e.g., Canada, Italy, Mexico, India, Thailand) and on different continents (e.g., NA, Europe, Asia), and so on. Did engineering design for several years (because I wanted to)). A specialty was up-front process design, but also hydraulics, pressure relief, and heat transfer. And yes, also worked on the ground for several years in manufacturing including day-to-day operation getting hands dirty. Indeed, being in production was my mainstay.

    I even helped a licensee in China start-up a polypropylene plant. In that experience, I worked 6-7 days a week 12 hours a day on the ground commissioning equipment and bringing in the feedstocks, and starting the polymerization. Trained the Chinese to run the plant. I was only 27 years old. Did similar stuff in America and Italy.

    While I have worked in specialty chemicals, pharmaceuticals, oil & gas, pulp & paper, etc, and also decided not to take the executive path (which may have been a mistake), I am an alleged expert (I do carry a briefcase sometimes) on polyolefin process technology which fits well with now being a patent attorney. Some of my clients as an attorney are among the largest producers of polyolefin in the world and leaders in polyolefin technology.

    Though now an attorney, I will always be a chemical engineer. In other words, I am a chemical engineer who happens to also be a patent attorney later in life. That is a common path for many patent attorneys, to have experience as an engineer, mathematician, or scientist, and then to become a patent attorney.
  9. 27 Nov '12 20:05
    I make good money as an attorney, have a lot of autonomy, and interact with a lot of interesting and bright people. If I had to choose one slice recently, I would say that GE inventors are incredibly bright.

    By the way. during that startup in China, I lived out in the countryside (where they didn't allow foreign tourists) for four months in 1990, and also was in Tiananmen Square on the one year anniversary of the massacre, and also flew Air China between Tokyo and Beijing without knowing the State Dept had said not to fly Air China because there was a bomb threat.

    (Also by the way, I have never agree with the bias against the nuclear industry, your neck of the woods. The chemical and nuclear industries kind of have a kinship that way I think.)
  10. Standard member sasquatch672
    Don't Like It Leave
    27 Nov '12 20:09 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by moon1969
    I make good money as an attorney, have a lot of autonomy, and interact with a lot of interesting and bright people. If I had to choose one slice recently, I would say that GE inventors are incredibly bright.

    By the way. during that startup in China, I lived out in the countryside (where they didn't allow foreign tourists) for four months in 1990, and al ...[text shortened]... ck of the woods. The chemical and nuclear industries kind of have a kinship that way I think.)
    See? Now we have a basis with which to have an intelligent conversation.

    EDIT: Starting a new thread. Please participate.