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Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. 16 Apr '10 03:19
    Is the Tea Party the biggest grass roots movement since the Civil Rights Movement?
  2. 16 Apr '10 03:35
    No. I'm not convinced that it is a movement. If I'm wrong, the Civil Rights Act is in jeopardy.
  3. 16 Apr '10 03:40 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by badmoon
    No. I'm not convinced that it is a movement. If I'm wrong, the Civil Rights Act is in jeopardy.
    So you are saying that the movement is manufactured? By whom, the Republican party?

    As for the Civil Rights Act being in jeopardy, what are you talking about?
  4. 16 Apr '10 17:27
    Originally posted by whodey
    Is the Tea Party the biggest grass roots movement since the Civil Rights Movement?
    grass roots?

    even though it has received major support from fox news, and some republicans?
    (most notably, sarah palin)
  5. 16 Apr '10 17:37
    Originally posted by whodey
    Is the Tea Party the biggest grass roots movement since the Civil Rights Movement?
    Why would you compare the corporate sponsored / PAC sponsored / RNC sponsored / number one rated news channel sponsored "tea party" to the grass roots civil rights movement?
  6. 16 Apr '10 18:15
    Originally posted by USArmyParatrooper
    Why would you compare the corporate sponsored / PAC sponsored / RNC sponsored / number one rated news channel sponsored "tea party" to the grass roots civil rights movement?
    because after all, they're real americans, duh!
  7. 17 Apr '10 11:54 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by generalissimo
    because after all, they're real americans, duh!
    No they are most certainly not real Americans. You see, Fox news have poisened the minds of Americans to get them to believe that their government is out of control in terms of spending and ever expanding government. Of course, they then went out and hired millions of actors like myself who have gone out in support of Tea Parties around the country. In fact, the majority of these folks are Canadian actors. Just don't tell anyone, it will be our own little secret.
  8. Subscriber FMF
    a.k.a. John W Booth
    17 Apr '10 11:57
    Originally posted by whodey
    Of course, they then went out and hired millions of actors like myself who have gone out in support of Tea Parties around the country.
    This Tea Party movement is merely millions of people like you?
  9. 17 Apr '10 12:25 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by FMF
    This Tea Party movement is merely millions of people like you?
    http://www.aolnews.com/the-point/article/surveys-show-tea-party-goes-beyond-the-fringe/19426880

    "Tea Partiers are quite representative of the public at large when it comes to age, race, and employment, according to Gallup's Lydia Saad, although the movement supporters are a bit more than average to be male and middle class. And they are not all Republicans. In the USA Today Gallop poll, 43% of tea party supporters identify themselves as independents and 8% of Democrats Surveys done by the GOP leaning Winston Group produced a somewhat different breakdown: 28% independent, 13% democrat and 57% republican. Overall, 17% of the people Winston polled said they were "part of the tea party movement". Hot Air's Ed Morrissey charged that news networks have "sneeringly misrepresented" the Tea Party for monthgs, branding its followers as "racist, reactionary, Birthers, and just about every insult one could find in the dictionary."

    What I found interesting is that only 57% of Tea Party supporters have a favorable opinion of Republicans.

    The article does point out that even though the tea party represents Americans demographically, politically it does not. For example, it cites the fact that 9 out of 10 Tea Partiers oppose Obamacare, compared with half of Americans. However, a CBS poll out this April shows that 53% of Amricans oppose Obamacare and only 32% support it.

    http://scaredmonkeys.com/2010/09/03/cbs-poll-on-obamacare-supporter-for-obamacare-falling-still-defeat-for-democrats-in-midterms/

    Obama said in an interview with Matt Lauer, "My hope is that we move forward and we are tackling things like the deficit, imposing a freeze on domestic spending, taking steps that show we are sincere about dealing with our long-term problems, that some of that group will dissapate."

    Well Mr. President, we are waiting.
  10. 17 Apr '10 12:45 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by whodey
    http://www.aolnews.com/the-point/article/surveys-show-tea-party-goes-beyond-the-fringe/19426880

    "Tea Partiers are quite representative of the public at large when it comes to age, race, and employment, according to Gallup's Lydia Saad, although the movement supporters are a bit more than average to be male and middle class. And they are not all Republican lems, that some of that group will dissapate."

    Well Mr. President, we are waiting.
    Surveys done by the GOP leaning Winston Group produced a somewhat different breakdown: 28% independent, 13% democrat and 57% republican.


    This explodes the myth that the Tea Party draws equally from all party identifications and ideologies. If it did, the number of GOPs would be about equal to the number of Dems - instead the GOP outnumbers the Dems by more than a 4:1 ratio.

    But the party breakdown does closely resemble what I would expect if you did a poll of people who voted GOP in a given presidential election -- mostly GOPs, a decent number of independents that went GOP, and a small number of conservative Dems that usually vote GOP in national elections.

    So the Tea Party DOES seem to draw from a broad cross-section of people who favor GOP presidents - the main difference being that Tea Party supporters clearly feel more passionately about their views than the typical GOP voter. Probably a good approximation of the GOP base.

    They make up about 20% of the total population - much more than a "fringe movement", but hardly a majority - but they would probably make up about 50% of the people who would show up to vote in a GOP primary which would give them a lot of sway within the party.
  11. 17 Apr '10 12:53
    Originally posted by Melanerpes

    They make up about 20% of the total population - much more than a "fringe movement", but hardly a majority - but they would probably make up about 50% of the people who would show up to vote in a GOP primary which would give them a lot of sway within the party.[/b]
    Er...um.....the number who support the Tea Parties are up to 28% from a recent poll in April. In addition, 26% oppose them and 38% neither oppose nor favor them and 8% had no opion. I read this as 46% undecided, 28% in favor, and 26% in opposition. So there is now a war underway for the hearts and minds of the undecided. It is then no wonder that those on the left are out to villify the movement. Considering the course that the government seems to be headed towards, they have a lot to be fearful about.
  12. 18 Apr '10 01:11 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by whodey
    Er...um.....the number who support the Tea Parties are up to 28% from a recent poll in April. In addition, 26% oppose them and 38% neither oppose nor favor them and 8% had no opion. I read this as 46% undecided, 28% in favor, and 26% in opposition. So there is now a war underway for the hearts and minds of the undecided. It is then no wonder that those on ...[text shortened]... the course that the government seems to be headed towards, they have a lot to be fearful about.
    http://documents.nytimes.com/new-york-timescbs-news-poll-national-survey-of-tea-party-supporters?ref=politics

    In question #79, Tea Party support was at 21% (21% favorable, 62% undecided, 18% unfavorable), so it's not that much different from your numbers, your poll found a way to get more people to "decide" and they split evenly. The poll I saw also found (question #84) that only 22% of the Tea Party "supporters" (or 4% of the overall population) had actually donated money to the Tea Party and-or attended a rally or meeting - I would imagine that the typical Tea Party "supporter" might not be the same thing as the avid Tea Party "participant". Unfortunately, they didn't specifically poll the "participants" to see if they differed significantly from the "non-participating supporters"

    But if we go with your numbers. Being that the supporters of the Tea Party appear to be pretty much the same thing as supporters of "boilerplate GOP" - the numbers would then read, 28% favor boilerplate GOP, 46% are undecided, and 28% are opposed -and we're pretty much where America has been for the last 25 years - split about evenly between the two parties.

    I would imagine that as more people become aware of the Tea Party, some more of the undecided will make up their mind, and the Tea Party support and opposition might both rise into the mid 30's.

    I also wouldn't be at all surprised if support for the GOP ends up being a few points greater than support for the Dems in the elections this November simply because the evil Bush (and his evil wars) is no longer president and the evil Obama (and his evil healthcare law) now is president.
  13. 18 Apr '10 01:14
    Originally posted by whodey
    No they are most certainly not real Americans. You see, Fox news have poisened the minds of Americans to get them to believe that their government is out of control in terms of spending and ever expanding government. Of course, they then went out and hired millions of actors like myself who have gone out in support of Tea Parties around the country. In fac ...[text shortened]... of these folks are Canadian actors. Just don't tell anyone, it will be our own little secret.
    don't imagine you were fooling anybody. "eh, you hoser!" is endemic amongst the TPA.
  14. 18 Apr '10 01:21
    Originally posted by zeeblebot
    don't imagine you were fooling anybody. "eh, you hoser!" is endemic amongst the TPA.
    Take off!! Eh?
  15. 18 Apr '10 01:28
    Originally posted by whodey
    http://www.aolnews.com/the-point/article/surveys-show-tea-party-goes-beyond-the-fringe/19426880

    "Tea Partiers are quite representative of the public at large when it comes to age, race, and employment, according to Gallup's Lydia Saad, although the movement supporters are a bit more than average to be male and middle class. And they are not all Republican ...[text shortened]... lems, that some of that group will dissapate."

    Well Mr. President, we are waiting.
    A phone call asking, "do you support the tea party movement" =/= a representation of tea party attendees.