Debates Forum

Debates Forum

  1. Behind the scenes
    Joined
    27 Jun '16
    Moves
    1406
    28 Aug '18 22:50
    I was 14 in 1969 when the Charles Manson gang killed Sharon Tate and a number of others in California. Manson died in prison awhile ago, Lynette (Squeaky Fromme) has been released, but Leslie Van Houten remains behind bars. Miss Van Houten (now 68) has spent nearly 50 years in prison for murder, and is now a small, frail old woman in the twilight of her life. While I don't argue the fact the crime she committed was horrible, I do argue with Governor Brown's reason for denying her parole being " a threat to public safety" Technology has produced items such as electronic monitoring ankle bracelets coupled with home confinement as a way to ease prison overcrowding, so I ask: Should more elderly inmates who have served decades in prison be granted home confinement along with monitoring devices as a means of saving money and easing prison overcrowding??

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/manson-follower-leslie-van-houten-denied-parole-governor-n839411
  2. Zugzwang
    Joined
    08 Jun '07
    Moves
    2120
    29 Aug '18 01:472 edits
    Originally posted by @mchill
    I was 14 in 1969 when the Charles Manson gang killed Sharon Tate and a number of others in California. Manson died in prison awhile ago, Lynette (Squeaky Fromme) has been released, but Leslie Van Houten remains behind bars. Miss Van Houten (now 68) has spent nearly 50 years in prison for murder, and is now a small, frail old woman in the twilight of her life ...[text shortened]... ://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/manson-follower-leslie-van-houten-denied-parole-governor-n839411
    Mchill ignorantly overrates the value of 'electronic monitoring ankle bracelets'.

    https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/aug/28/digital-shackles-the-unexpected-cruelty-of-ankle-monitors

    "‘Digital shackles’: the unexpected cruelty of ankle monitors"

    "Every day at about 5pm, 60-year-old Willard Birts has to find a power outlet. Then he has
    towait two hours next to it while the battery on his ankle monitor recharges. If he lets the battery
    drain, or enters San Mateo county, he risks being sent back to jail while he awaits trial.

    Birts pays $30 per day – that’s $840 per month – for the privilege of wearing the bulky device.
    It sucks up all his income, leaving him homeless and sleeping in his Ford Escape in Oakland."

    "But wearers described them as digital shackles that deprive them of their liberties in cruel and unexpected ways.
    “It pretends to be an alternative to incarceration but it’s actually a form of incarceration,”
    said James Kilgore, who runs the Challenging E-Carceration project at the Center for Media Justice."

    "Beyond the financial costs, ankle monitors introduce new ways for the wearer – disproportionately,
    people from impoverished and socially marginalised communities – to end up back in prison.
    “The minute you have a device on you you can go back to prison because your bus is
    late, or the battery dies or there is a power outage,” Kilgore said."

    "Despite the surge in use of ankle monitors, there’s not much rigorous research to suggest
    they are effective at preventing people from absconding or re-offending or at keeping the public safe."

    "In California, the sex offender Phillip Garrido wore a GPS monitor and was visited at his
    home by parole agents at least twice a month. It took 18 years for agents to discover
    that he had been keeping Jaycee Dugard captive in his garden, having kidnapped her
    as a child. During that time Garrido repeatedly raped Dugard, fathering two children."