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  1. 12 Sep '10 13:48
    http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2010/09/07/trash-police-invade-thanks-government-stimulus/

    Beware the green police. They don't carry guns and there is no police academy to train them, but if you don't recycle your trash properly, they can walk up your driveway and give you a $100 ticket.

    They know what is in your trash, they know what you eat, they know how often you bring your recycle to the curb -- and they may be coming to your town soon. That is, if they are not already there.

    In a growing number of cities across the US, local governments are placing computer chips in recycling bins to collect data on refuse disposal, and then fining residents who don't participate in recycling efforts and forcing others into educational programs to instill respect for the environment.

    From Charlotte NC to Clevland OH, from Boise, Idaho to Fint Michigan, the green police are spreading out. And that alarms some privacy advocates who are asking: Should local governments have the right to monitor how you divide your paper cups from your plastic forks? Is that really the role of government?

    In Dayton Ohio, chips placed in recycle bins transmit information to garbage trucks to keep track of whether residents are recycling -- a program that incensed Arizona Sen. John McCain, who pointed out that the city was awarded half a million dollars in stimulus money for it. Harry Lewis, a computer science professor at Harvard University and a noted privacy expert, cried foul about the "spy chips", which are already in use in several cities and are often funded by government stimulus programs. He noted that cattle farmers use the same chips to tell if Betsy the Cow has generated her milk quota for the day.

    "It's like treating people like cattle!" Lewis cried. Are people "supposed to produce recyclable waste, rather than certain quantities of milk?" What, he asked, happens if you don't generate enough?

    But there is a clear upside to the technology, said Michael Kanellos, editor in chief of Green Tech Media.

    "By tagging bins, haulers can weigh garbage, and weighing brings accountability. Consumers that diligently recycle will likely become eligable for rebates in some jurisdictions," he wrote recently. "Conversely, those who throw away excessive amounts of trash may face steeper tariffs in the future....recycling, meanwhile, will go from being something that gives the consumer peace of mind to way to reduce household bills."

    Best case and worst case scenarios

    Dayton City Manager Thomas Ritchia said the city is using the chips to aid marketing campaigns, not to punish uncooperative critizens. "The data will be used to identify which residents participate in the recycling program, at what rate do they participate and the average weight of each participant's recycling," he said.

    Charlotte, NC, aslo uses trash tags, and it gathers similar information. City spokeswoman Charita Curtis said the city uses the data from the tags -- low-power radio frequency IDs (RFIDs) -- to find which areas are not recycling as often and to start education initiatives there. The data is not shared outside of the city, she stressed, and it is not used to track down specific residents. The RFID program is voluntary.

    "We can do targeted recycling education for areas with low participation, providing information on how to recycle, what can be recycled, the importance of recycling to encourage more recycling participation," Curtis said. "Some residents may not participate simply because they do not know how to and we would provide that education in hopes that they start recycling more."

    But there is no vounteering in Clevland, where the trash police can fine you $100 for not recycling.

    Clevland will run reports on who fails to recycle consistently, and then it will send out the green cops, waste collection commissioner Ronnie Owens told ABC news.

    In late August, Clevland's city council voted to roll out the tags to 25,000 residents, and it may extend the program to the entire city. It costs $30 per ton to haul away trash, but the city gets paid $26 per ton to recycle it. The program should generate about $170,000 annunally in revenue for the city, the Washington Times reported.

    But the new equipment and bins costs $2.5 million, so it will take about 15 years to recoup the costs of deploying the technology. Clevland officials did not immediatly respond to requests for more information, but reports indicate that officials will know when you bring your trash to the curb -- and may go through your trash to ensure you are recycling properly.

    Right to trash privacy

    Privacy experts, meanwhile, are up in arms about how these chips are being used to collect data.

    Lewis said Clevland residents need to ask whether sacrificing their privacy -- having the government snoop through their trash -- is worth the envirnonmental benefit. If not, he said, they should start a referendum to overthrow the ruling. Part of the issue, he said, is that the system is easy to fool : A neighbor, he said, might dump your recycling into his bin to avoid fines.

    The trash police could unfairly give the worst ciitizens a pass, Lewis added. He warned that those generating the most waste by using bottled water instead of tap water (plastic water bottles are a major source of trash) could earn credits for recycling wastefull bottles -- a reward for a poor choice, in other words.

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    So how about it? Is this a good idea?
  2. 12 Sep '10 14:02
    Of course it isn't. The wacko left is simply out of control. They love the fact that they can make slaves of general population.

    We can do targeted recycling education for areas with low participation, providing information on how to recycle, what can be recycled, the importance of recycling to encourage more recycling participation


    I wonder how they are going to accomplesh the education? Will they hand out pamplhlets that will simply add to the trash?
  3. 12 Sep '10 14:19 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by Eladar
    Of course it isn't. The wacko left is simply out of control. They love the fact that they can make slaves of general population.

    [b]We can do targeted recycling education for areas with low participation, providing information on how to recycle, what can be recycled, the importance of recycling to encourage more recycling participation



    I wonde ...[text shortened]... to accomplesh the education? Will they hand out pamplhlets that will simply add to the trash?[/b]
    Wacko left? Obviously you need "re-educated". No doubt, you follow that Mormon loving Glenn Beck who tells lies 24/7. Just tell us where you live and we can come "help" you.

    As for the re-education camps, these are the green jobs Obama was talking about. Think of the number of jobs this will produce. We will need more people to make micro chips, people to mail out fines, people to collect those fines, people to come arrest you if you don't pay your fines, and people to hold you in prison for not paying your fines. As for yourself, apparently you favor continuing high levels of unemployment. All I can say is, you appear to be part of the problem. At least I can rest knowing all the billions in stimulus money are going to worth while causes.
  4. 12 Sep '10 14:32
    Originally posted by Eladar
    I wonder how they are going to accomplesh the education? Will they hand out pamplhlets that will simply add to the trash?[/b]
    I don't know how they will accomplish the education. If they do use pamphlets, perhaps they could model them after those JW tracts where everyone is smiling and living in a perfect utopia.
  5. 13 Sep '10 17:35
    does this mean mccain is still in running