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Debates Forum

  1. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    25 Jun '09 20:49
    Earthquakes. That's what. One must challenge the wisdom of mass-producing electricity using this technology. Check out what happens when you do this....(has sound)


    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2009/06/23/us/Geothermal.html
  2. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    26 Jun '09 00:12
    Originally posted by uzless
    Earthquakes. That's what. One must challenge the wisdom of mass-producing electricity using this technology. Check out what happens when you do this....(has sound)


    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2009/06/23/us/Geothermal.html
    Great.

    So don't do it near the San Andreas fault.

    Duh!

  3. 26 Jun '09 03:41
    Originally posted by uzless
    Earthquakes. That's what. One must challenge the wisdom of mass-producing electricity using this technology. Check out what happens when you do this....(has sound)


    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2009/06/23/us/Geothermal.html
    Probaby a bunch of nonesense. There are areas which they could test it safely. Do some tests first before drilling close to cities. I second what sh76 said.
  4. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    26 Jun '09 16:44
    Originally posted by sh76
    Great.

    So don't do it near the San Andreas fault.

    Duh!

    Did you watch the graphic? Geo-thermal is best used where the earth's crust is the thinnest. Thin crust areas are where the fault lines are. Fault lines produce earthquakes. Drilling near fault lines risk more earthquakes.

    Did you miss that part?
  5. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    26 Jun '09 16:46
    Originally posted by joe beyser
    Probaby a bunch of nonesense.
    ??

    Despite the facts, you choose to believe the opposite?
  6. 26 Jun '09 17:09
    Originally posted by uzless
    ??

    Despite the facts, you choose to believe the opposite?
    Iceland produces most of its power through hydroelectric and geothermal power. What's there not to believe?

    Obviously the technology can't be applied everywhere, but it works fine there.
  7. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    26 Jun '09 17:57
    Originally posted by uzless
    Did you watch the graphic? Geo-thermal is best used where the earth's crust is the thinnest. Thin crust areas are where the fault lines are. Fault lines produce earthquakes. Drilling near fault lines risk more earthquakes.

    Did you miss that part?
    There are places on that map of thin crust in eastern Idaho, much, much further from the San Andreas fault than the areas in middle California where they are drilling.
  8. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    26 Jun '09 18:00
    Originally posted by sh76
    There are places on that map of thin crust in eastern Idaho, much, much further from the San Andreas fault than the areas in middle California where they are drilling.
    Idaho doesn't have the pop. density of California. Transmission distance greatly increases the cost of producing electrictity.

    How many people actually live in california vs idaho?
  9. Standard member uzless
    The So Fist
    26 Jun '09 18:02
    Originally posted by KazetNagorra
    Iceland produces most of its power through hydroelectric and geothermal power. What's there not to believe?

    Obviously the technology can't be applied everywhere, but it works fine there.
    DO you know the difference between iceland and california from a geological perspective?
  10. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    26 Jun '09 18:16 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by uzless
    Idaho doesn't have the pop. density of California. Transmission distance greatly increases the cost of producing electrictity.

    How many people actually live in california vs idaho?
    Even if it helps fewer people in Idaho, it still removes those people from having to be on the grid that is fed by whatever source feed the West Coast. It still saves energy over-all.

    All the Times feature really shows is that it's not a great alternative to be a comprehensive replacement for fossil fuel energy by itself. I don't know anyone who was saying that it was. It can be used alongside solar, wind, hydro-electric, nuclear, biomass and other "clean" energy sources as part of a comprehensive solution.
  11. 26 Jun '09 18:42 / 2 edits
    Has everyone but me missed this but producing earthquakes this way could be a good thing and save millions of lives!

    Think about it; earthquakes are produced by tension building up in the faults until it slips and thus the longer the time between one earthquake and the next the greater the tension build-up and thus the more devastating the earthquake. So by artificially triggering an earthquake you are releasing that tension before it has a chance to build up even more to produce an even more devastating earthquake naturally.
    The more earthquakes that can be artificially triggered this way the better because if they are triggered often enough then the tension in the faults will never have a chance to build-up much and all the earthquakes would thus be of low magnitude and virtually harmless.

    Therefore, it should become the official policy for these geothermal producers to, where and when economic, deliberately do their work in such a way as to increase the chances of their activity triggering earthquakes and with the official approval of the government.
  12. 26 Jun '09 20:23
    Originally posted by uzless
    Earthquakes. That's what. One must challenge the wisdom of mass-producing electricity using this technology. Check out what happens when you do this....(has sound)
    Just because it is unwise to use it in certain areas doesn't make it nonviable. Almost all energy sources are specific to certain areas. Thats why we build power lines.
    The fact is that geothermal energy is being used in some places and is therefore viable. Whether it is cost effective compared to other sources is another matter.

    As for producing earthquakes, drilling for oil can do that, so can large dams. Theres a place somewhere in south east Asia (I forget exactly where) where they drilled and mud started coming up and burying the town.
  13. 26 Jun '09 20:50
    Well, do your testing in the Bay area if you please.
    If San Fransisco is ruined by an earthquaqe, don't blame me, it's all San Andreas fault.
  14. Standard member sh76
    Civis Americanus Sum
    26 Jun '09 20:59
    Originally posted by FabianFnas
    Well, do your testing in the Bay area if you please.
    If San Fransisco is ruined by an earthquaqe, don't blame me, it's all San Andreas fault.
    San Francisco and the Bay Area is a beautiful area. It's a shame it's wasted on the people that live there.
  15. Donation rwingett
    Ming the Merciless
    26 Jun '09 21:27
    Originally posted by sh76
    San Francisco and the Bay Area is a beautiful area. It's a shame it's wasted on the people that live there.
    What demographic is that a dig against?