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  1. Account suspended
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    11 May '17 05:332 edits
    YouTube

    Right now it's this one above. It's 07:20 AM Serbian time, I was awake from 5, atypically for me but I had to. In my 7-storey building there is another refurbishing of newly sold apartment, second refurbishing in a raw. Noise is insane. I have to work, and that urban rettotism of a kind made me change usual rhythm.
    I work until 5 til 9, then I put ear plugs in my ears when first drilling beginns, than I have frugal lunch around noon, and work till 14.00 when I have chance for a nap till 17.00 (old house order from communist times.) Then drillig wakes me up again, I go for a short walk, buy some rolls and yoghurt, since I am at the moment in great financial crysis and the work till 21.00.
    Then I go to bed dead tired and sleep until 04.00 or 05.00...

    I hope this translation I am working on will pay off in a grant next year and in a fee also, coz otherwise I am doomed.
    Drilling, noise, crysis... It reminds me on Trump, really.



    [hidden] It happens to nearly everyone: You hear a bit of a pop song on your way to work and it gets "stuck" in your head all day.

    Now, British researchers say they've determined why this so-called "earworm" effect is more likely with some songs than others.

    "Regardless of the chart success of a song, there are certain features of the melody that make it more prone to getting stuck in people's heads, like some sort of private musical screensaver," explained study author Dr. Kelly Jakubowski, of the department of music at Durham University in Durham, England.

    "These musically sticky songs seem to have quite a fast tempo, along with a common melodic shape and unusual intervals or repetitions, like we can hear in the opening riff of 'Smoke On The Water' by Deep Purple or in the chorus of 'Bad Romance' by Lady Gaga," she said.

    One common melodic pattern is a rise and then a fall in pitch between phrases. For example, this happens in the children's rhyme "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," as well as in Maroon 5's hit "Moves Like Jagger," the researchers said.

    According to the study, 90 percent of people get a song stuck in their head at least once a week, typically when the brain is relatively unoccupied, such as while walking or doing chores.

    But why do some tunes get stuck while others don't?

    To find out, Jakubowski's team analyzed data from more than 3,000 people surveyed between 2010 and 2013. People were asked to list the songs that most tended to get stuck in their heads. The researchers then compared the melodies of these earworm songs to those of songs that hadn't been cited as earworms but had achieved similar popularity on the U.K. music charts.

    The songs included in the study were limited to genres such as rock, rap, pop, and rhythm & blues.

    The study found real differences. Jakubowski's group reported that the earworm tunes typically had a faster tempo and a fairly generic and easy-to-remember melody.

    Not surprisingly, songs that got more radio play and have recently been on the hit charts are more likely to become earworms, the study found.[/hidden]
  2. Account suspended
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    11 May '17 05:39
    By-the-way, there is a true anecdote connected to above song and her singer.
    A famous and rich Serbian producer and composer had plans for a LP with another singer and he payed in advance studio and printing facilities, and the non-destined singer cancelled everything in last second. (Needless to say she "never sang again in that city".)
    Well he called that lady with artistic name Baby Doll, and she recorded all songs during one single night.
    LP was great success and at the time people used to buy records.
    He decided to award her with a role in a film.
    It was this film
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0173065/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_3
    a crime story in disco music settings in Belgrade in the midst of 1980s.
  3. Joined
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    11 May '17 14:55
    Earworm...it's called an earworm.
  4. Standard memberapathist
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    12 May '17 06:14
    Sometimes it is a phrase that kick starts an earworm. As part of a regular conversation I heard "two guitars" and suddenly juke box hero invades my head. But that song talks about one guitar! Apparently the earworm beast is adaptable.
  5. SubscriberFMF
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    12 May '17 06:27
    Originally posted by vandervelde
    Can't get that song out of my head
    This song is one I often find myself singing (to myself) although I sing only the bass during the guitar solo.

    YouTube
  6. Standard memberapathist
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    12 May '17 06:54
    Ha! I googled the top earworms, and only one worked. Getting old must be a vaccination.
  7. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
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    12 May '17 14:43
    Originally posted by Great Big Stees
    Earworm...it's called an earworm.
    Earwig, surely?
  8. Subscriberlemondrop
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    12 May '17 17:03
    there was a Seinfeld episode and a tune George couldn't get out of his head
    "master of the house"
  9. Standard memberapathist
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    12 May '17 17:18
    Originally posted by Ghost of a Duke
    Earwig, surely?
    I thought an earwig can eat into your brain through an ear, and then hatch hungry babies. Not like a catchy tune at all.
  10. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
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    12 May '17 17:56
    Originally posted by apathist
    I thought an earwig can eat into your brain through an ear, and then hatch hungry babies. Not like a catchy tune at all.
    What if the earwig was humming a catchy tune?

    A double whammy.
  11. Joined
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    12 May '17 21:17
    Originally posted by Ghost of a Duke
    Earwig, surely?
    I think an earwig is something worn by gentlemen of a certain age when their ears start to go bald; a fashion which has its' roots in Norwich, I believe.
  12. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
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    13 May '17 07:33
    Originally posted by Indonesia Phil
    I think an earwig is something worn by gentlemen of a certain age when their ears start to go bald; a fashion which has its' roots in Norwich, I believe.
    🙂

    Technically speaking, the 'Ear-wig' originated in Ipswich in 1837 when the Marquis of Somerset noticed an imbalance of hair across his ears. (Horse hair was used initially I believe, though the preference now tends to be more towards orangutan).
  13. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    13 May '17 08:32
    Originally posted by Ghost of a Duke
    🙂

    Technically speaking, the 'Ear-wig' originated in Ipswich in 1837 when the Marquis of Somerset noticed an imbalance of hair across his ears. (Horse hair was used initially I believe, though the preference now tends to be more towards orangutan).
    Europe banned orang-utan hair in earwigs back in the eighties.
    With Brexit perhaps it will be fashionable again in UK?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wildlife_trade#orang-utan
  14. SubscriberGhost of a Duke
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    13 May '17 19:49
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    Europe banned orang-utan hair in earwigs back in the eighties.
    With Brexit perhaps it will be fashionable again in UK?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wildlife_trade#orang-utan
    The problem with orang-utan hair is that it invariably comes in red and is resistant to most hair dyes. Poor Viscount Longbottom had his reputation seriously dented when, in 1897, he turned up for afternoon tea at the Savoy with Sumatran orang-utan protruding from his ears.
  15. Unknown Territories
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    13 May '17 20:14
    Originally posted by Ghost of a Duke
    The problem with orang-utan hair is that it invariably comes in red and is resistant to most hair dyes. Poor Viscount Longbottom had his reputation seriously dented when, in 1897, he turned up for afternoon tea at the Savoy with Sumatran orang-utan protruding from his ears.
    Wait: orangutans aren't...

    orange?
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