General Forum

General Forum

  1. Joined
    14 Mar '04
    Moves
    97094
    16 Mar '13 15:01
    Is this you?

    www.avianweb.com/tuftedcoquettes.html
  2. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    USA
    Joined
    14 Jul '07
    Moves
    43012
    16 Mar '13 16:28
    Originally posted by Great Big Stees
    Is this you?

    www.avianweb.com/tuftedcoquettes.html
    User 261858
  3. Subscribercoquette
    Already mated
    Omaha, Nebraska, USA
    Joined
    04 Jul '06
    Moves
    919441
    16 Mar '13 16:41
    Originally posted by Great Big Stees
    Is this you?

    www.avianweb.com/tuftedcoquettes.html
    no, i'm not that pretty
  4. SubscriberPonderable
    chemist
    Linkenheim
    Joined
    22 Apr '05
    Moves
    526002
    16 Mar '13 16:541 edit
    Originally posted by coquette
    no, i'm not that pretty
    Then we hope that your husband is as handsome as the male there...
  5. Joined
    14 Mar '04
    Moves
    97094
    16 Mar '13 17:22
    Originally posted by coquette
    no, i'm not that pretty
    That's what another "bird" thought. Turned out she really wasn't a duckling afterall.
  6. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    USA
    Joined
    14 Jul '07
    Moves
    43012
    16 Mar '13 19:23
    Originally posted by coquette

    no, i'm not that pretty
    Hamlet Act 3, Scene 2

    Player Queen:
    Both here and hence pursue me lasting strife,
    If once I be a widow, ever I be a wife!

    Player King:
    'Tis deeply sworn. Sweet, leave me here a while,
    My spirits grow dull, and fain I would beguile
    The tedious day with sleep.

    Player Queen:
    Sleep rock thy brain,
    And never come mischance between us twain!

    Hamlet:
    Madam, how like you this play?

    Queen:
    The lady doth protest too much, methinks.
    _______________________________

    Hamlet Act 3, Scene 2:

    Almost always misquoted as "Methinks the lady doth protest too much," Queen Gertrude's line is both drier than the misquotation, thanks to the delayed "methinks" and much more ironic. Prince Hamlet's question is intended to smoke out his mother, to whom, as he intended, this Player Queen bears some striking resemblances [see THE PLAY'S THE THING]. The queen in the play, like Gertrude, seems too deeply attached to her first husband to ever even consider remarrying; Gertrude, however, after the death of Hamlet's father, has remarried. We don't know whether Gertrude ever made the same sorts of promises to Hamlet's father that the Player Queen makes to the Player King (who will soon be murdered)—but the irony of her response should be clear.

    By "protest," Gertrude doesn't mean "object" or "deny"—these meanings postdate Hamlet. The principal meaning of "protest" in Shakespeare's day was "vow" or "declare solemnly," a meaning preserved in our use of "protestation." When we smugly declare that "the lady doth protest too much," we almost always mean that the lady objects so much as to lose credibility. Gertrude says that Player Queen affirms so much as to lose credibility. Her vows are too elaborate, too artful, too insistent. More cynically, the queen may also imply that such vows are silly in the first place, and thus may indirectly defend her own remarriage.
    .
  7. Joined
    14 Mar '04
    Moves
    97094
    17 Mar '13 16:02
    Originally posted by Grampy Bobby
    [b]Hamlet Act 3, Scene 2

    Player Queen:
    Both here and hence pursue me lasting strife,
    If once I be a widow, ever I be a wife!

    Player King:
    'Tis deeply sworn. Sweet, leave me here a while,
    My spirits grow dull, and fain I would beguile
    The tedious day with sleep.

    Player Queen:
    Sleep rock thy brain,
    And never come mischance between us t ...[text shortened]... first place, and thus may indirectly defend her own remarriage.
    .[/b]
    Ah this thread's for the birds.😴
  8. Joined
    11 Jul '06
    Moves
    8218
    17 Mar '13 18:45
    Originally posted by Great Big Stees
    Ah this thread's for the birds.😴
    dont insult the birds
Back to Top