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General Forum

  1. Account suspended
    Joined
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    25 Apr '16 21:29
    How many times you heard this "if I got rich I would retire and spend the rest of my life enjoying in what I love most", contradicted by opposite maxim "the work is essence, if I didn't work I couldn't live"?

    I ran across a statement by playwright Martin McDonagh from 2008-->
    In a 2008 interview with the Stop Smiling magazine, McDonagh revealed "I've got a couple of film scripts that are ready to go. I'm not going to do anything with them for a couple of years, until I've traveled and had some fun"!

    At the time he gained the fame as a playwright and was waiting a chance to do something in film.

    He did travel and he did make this film indees, in 2012--->
    Seven Psychopaths which he wrote, produced and directed for 15 million dollars budget and the film earned 30 million.

    Awesome to do such thing.
    I remembered other examples of hiatus in the world of art, film and entertainment.

    2.
    Guy Pearce
    --> After "L.A. Confidential" he was rich and famous but he spent time traveling, playing guitar and smoking pot.

    3.
    Joe Pesci
    In 1999, Pesci announced his retirement from acting to pursue a musical career and to enjoy life away from the camera.
    I think he got too tired from that sex scenes with Sharon Stone...

    4.
    Mike Meyers
    After "Austin Powers III" he did only voice and had some minor roles as in "Inglorious Basterds".
  2. Joined
    24 Apr '10
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    14639
    26 Apr '16 14:30
    The luckiest people get maximum enjoyment out of work. I am not one of those. The day I win the lottery will be the day my boss receives my letter of resignation. There will be poop in there as well.
  3. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
    That's Why I Drink
    Joined
    01 Jan '06
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    33672
    26 Apr '16 14:56
    True happiness is in erasing "if" from one's vocabulary. To want
    nothing, to expect as much, and to completely give up on life
    being good, beautiful, or fair. To continue breathing merely by
    automatic pilot and, most importantly, to be utterly pessimistic
    about everything.

    That way, whatever mildly good happening will be a huge surprise
    and sheer enjoyment. If not, then one will be able to experience
    quite often the deep pleasure of saying "I knew it" or "I told you so".

    This, you weird nerds, is the wisest thing you will ever read anywhere.

    You're welcome.
  4. Unknown Territories
    Joined
    05 Dec '05
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    20408
    26 Apr '16 16:07
    Originally posted by Great King Rat
    The luckiest people get maximum enjoyment out of work. I am not one of those. The day I win the lottery will be the day my boss receives my letter of resignation. There will be poop in there as well.
    My problems with the lottery.
    1. No skill is required, whatsoever. Every successful business venture requires some good fortune, but without skill and good decision-making, no business venture can be sustained with good fortune as its sole value.

    2. No one respects good fortune. As a general rule, man has a tendency to distrust success when it appears to be the result of happenstance. The full-court shot is the act of a desperate man and is only allowed at the professional level when no other options are available.

    3. Those who win the lottery are overwhelmingly the least qualified to manage the wealth. There are always exceptions to the rule, but the general rule of thumb with respect to lottery winners is that their lives are worse having won than their lives would have been without.

    4. Can't get no satisfaction. Lottery winnings change a person's perspective from consuming to live to living to consume. When every day is your birthday, your birthday becomes increasingly less special and eventually loses all luster.

    5. Change in ownership. Without inordinate wealth, the profound experiences in life are priceless; with inordinate wealth one is constantly measuring to see if enough is available to guaranty the experiences.

    This isn't an anti-consumerism, severe minimalist approach to life I'm advocating.
    Having very, very little to having a great deal has convinced me that more is often less.
  5. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
    That's Why I Drink
    Joined
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    26 Apr '16 16:27
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    When every day is your birthday, your birthday becomes increasingly less special and eventually loses all luster.
    When the missus tries to sell that argument for refusing to
    do the hanky panky, I get all Rawlsian.
  6. Unknown Territories
    Joined
    05 Dec '05
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    20408
    26 Apr '16 16:37
    Originally posted by Seitse
    When the missus tries to sell that argument for refusing to
    do the hanky panky, I get all Rawlsian.
    At least yours gives the refusal some effort...
  7. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
    That's Why I Drink
    Joined
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    33672
    26 Apr '16 17:031 edit
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    At least yours gives the refusal some effort...
    Is yours stuck in the good ol' headache line?

    I sorted that one out one day when I came to bed holding two
    aspirins and a glass of water and offered them to her. Puzzled,
    she told me she had no headache, after which I joyfully exclaimed
    "good, let's shag then!"
  8. Unknown Territories
    Joined
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    26 Apr '16 17:55
    Originally posted by Seitse
    Is yours stuck in the good ol' headache line?

    I sorted that one out one day when I came to bed holding two
    aspirins and a glass of water and offered them to her. Puzzled,
    she told me she had no headache, after which I joyfully exclaimed
    "good, let's shag then!"
    I actually tried that one.
    She asked why I wasn't on the couch.
  9. Joined
    24 Apr '10
    Moves
    14639
    26 Apr '16 21:06
    Originally posted by FreakyKBH
    My problems with the lottery.
    1. No skill is required, whatsoever. Every successful business venture requires some good fortune, but without skill and good decision-making, no business venture can be sustained with good fortune as its sole value.

    2. No one respects good fortune. As a general rule, man has a tendency to distrust success when it appe ...[text shortened]... ting.
    Having very, very little to having a great deal has convinced me that more is often less.
    I'll take my chances.

    The draw is tomorrow. I'm feeling rather lucky this time.
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