General Forum

General Forum

  1. SubscriberSuzianne
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    07 Feb '15 13:501 edit
    Originally posted by redbadger
    Geonoise sponge cake based biscuit with an orange flavoured jelly spread coated with milk chocolate .
    Biscuit as in cookie?

    I've heard Brits on here call cookies 'biscuits' before.

    In America, biscuits have more flour, less sugar and are usually had for breakfast.
  2. Standard memberredbadger
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    07 Feb '15 14:061 edit
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Biscuit as in cookie?

    I've heard Brits on here call cookies 'biscuits' before.

    In America, biscuits have more flour, less sugar and are usually had for breakfast.
    debate, the manufacturer won a legal battle to prove it was a cake (something to do with value added tax) in effect its a cross between a cake and a cookie.
  3. Standard memberSeitse
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    07 Feb '15 14:11
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Brits on here
    Are there Brits there?! 😲
  4. Standard memberredbadger
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    07 Feb '15 14:13
    Originally posted by Seitse
    Are there Brits there?! 😲
    I am here but I am English Oh F.U.C.K
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    07 Feb '15 16:261 edit
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    Biscuit as in cookie?

    I've heard Brits on here call cookies 'biscuits' before.
    And for once(!), I agree with the USAnians against the British.

    A biscuit is a very specific type of baked good - one that has been bis cuit - baked twice. A cookie - and I admit that, being a native speaker of the language from which that word was nicked, I may be prejudiced here - is any kind of small, sweet, bakeware.
    Crumbly biscuits like digestives, Maries or rich teas are biscuits. Biscuits are hard. Amaretti are very literally twice baked, and therefore definitely are biscuits. Jaffa cakes are not. Neither are shortbreads (mock tartan variety or others) or gingerbreads. They are cookies, though.
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    07 Feb '15 16:28
    Originally posted by redbadger
    I am here but I am English Oh F.U.C.K
    English? You sure you're not Scots? Goodness, someone warn Robbie!
  7. Standard memberredbadger
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    07 Feb '15 17:06
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    English? You sure you're not Scots? Goodness, someone warn Robbie!
    I used to be lead guitarist in guns and roses.
  8. In your face
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    07 Feb '15 18:38
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    No. McVities said they were cakes to avoid VAT and won.

    Jaffa Cakes are ... cakes, not biscuits.
    Sorry I got muddled then. So biscuits are deemed luxury and cakes aren't?
  9. Standard memberredbadger
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    07 Feb '15 21:10
    Originally posted by Sicilian Sausage
    Sorry I got muddled then. So biscuits are deemed luxury and cakes aren't?
    let them eat cake
  10. In your face
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    07 Feb '15 21:47
    Originally posted by redbadger
    let them eat cake
    Fixed: -

    Let them eat cak (poop)
  11. SubscriberSuzianne
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    08 Feb '15 00:291 edit
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    And for once(!), I agree with the USAnians against the British.

    A biscuit is a very specific type of baked good - one that has been bis cuit - baked twice. A cookie - and I admit that, being a native speaker of the language from which that word was nicked, I may be prejudiced here - is any kind of small, sweet, bakeware.
    Crumbly biscuits like ...[text shortened]... re shortbreads (mock tartan variety or others) or gingerbreads. They are cookies, though.
    So I gather you wouldn't like an American 'biscuit'.

    Buttermilk and flour and baking powder and a lil' bit of shortening or butter, a tiny bit of sugar and salt. That's it.

    We have them with sausage gravy in the South.

    If you ever had some, you'd come back for more and you'd call them biscuits and love it. 😀

    Come on, CP, back me up here. 🙂
  12. Standard memberwolfgang59
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    08 Feb '15 09:39
    Originally posted by Shallow Blue
    Neither are shortbreads .
    https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=shortbread+biscuits&biw=1920&bih=911&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=pS7XVKGKD5fl8AWmmoLQDA&sqi=2&ved=0CC8QsAQ
  13. In your face
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    08 Feb '15 09:39
    Originally posted by Suzianne
    So I gather you wouldn't like an American 'biscuit'.

    Buttermilk and flour and baking powder and a lil' bit of shortening or butter, a tiny bit of sugar and salt. That's it.

    We have them with sausage gravy in the South.

    If you ever had some, you'd come back for more and you'd call them biscuits and love it. 😀

    Come on, CP, back me up here. 🙂
    I think we call them 'crackers'. 'Nuts' can mean something similar but is a completely different type of savoury snack. 😉
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    08 Feb '15 10:271 edit
    Originally posted by wolfgang59
    https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=shortbread+biscuits&biw=1920&bih=911&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=pS7XVKGKD5fl8AWmmoLQDA&sqi=2&ved=0CC8QsAQ
    Yep. Shortbread cookies, not (unless I'm missing a step in their preparation) properly shortbread biscuits, no matter what tha intartoobs may call them. They only get baked once.
  15. SubscriberSuzianne
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    08 Feb '15 13:49
    Originally posted by Sicilian Sausage
    I think we call them 'crackers'. 'Nuts' can mean something similar but is a completely different type of savoury snack. 😉
    'Crackers'? No, crackers are crunchy and thin, saltines are a cracker. These biscuits I speak of are thick and bready, some soft, some more dense, but all more dense than bread, but not at all crisp and/or crunchy, like crackers. Ritz is a cracker.
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