General Forum

General Forum

Jerry Grette

SubscriberFMF
General 04 Sep '16 06:44
  1. SubscriberFMF
    Main Poster
    This Thread
    Joined
    28 Oct '05
    Moves
    29872
    04 Sep '16 06:44
    Nearly 1 in 5 parents in Britain regret the name they gave their child. A survey showed that 25% did so because of its commonality. Two other causes of regret were “it just doesn’t feel right” [21%] and "I was pressured into using it" [20%].

    The Independent ~ http://tinyurl.com/jrcpfre

    Two names that parents might regret in recent times are "Elsa" (made popular by a villainous character in a children's film called Frozen) and "Isis" [a name commonly used to refer to الدولة الإسلامية في العراق والشام‎ who are seen by many as مجموعة من الرجال استمناء القاتل].

    What children's names chosen in recent times might have become - or be soon set to become - a source of regret?
  2. Joined
    07 Aug '12
    Moves
    38838
    04 Sep '16 09:532 edits
    I mildly regret the middle name I gave one of my sons because it just feels a bit meaningless. It's a good name and the name of kings but just feels pointless.

    Each of my sons have names which are related to earlier relatives of our family tree; a bit like the tradition with pedigree dogs and racehorses.
  3. Joined
    29 Dec '08
    Moves
    6788
    04 Sep '16 14:29
    Originally posted by FMF
    Nearly 1 in 5 parents in Britain regret the name they gave their child. A survey showed that 25% did so because of its commonality. Two other causes of regret were “it just doesn’t feel right” [21%] and "I was pressured into using it" [20%].

    The Independent ~ http://tinyurl.com/jrcpfre

    Two names that parents might regret in recent times are "Elsa" (made ...[text shortened]... names chosen in recent times might have become - or be soon set to become - a source of regret?
    Alexa. In some circles its utterance calls up a demon.
  4. Joined
    27 Sep '06
    Moves
    9651
    05 Sep '16 01:19
    Originally posted by JS357
    Alexa. In some circles its utterance calls up a demon.
    19% of the time.
  5. SubscriberPonderable
    chemist
    Linkenheim
    Joined
    22 Apr '05
    Moves
    526208
    24 Sep '16 08:11
    Do you think the father of Major Major Major Major (catch 22) ever regretted the choice of names?
  6. Unknown Territories
    Joined
    05 Dec '05
    Moves
    20408
    24 Sep '16 10:00
    Originally posted by FMF
    Nearly 1 in 5 parents in Britain regret the name they gave their child. A survey showed that 25% did so because of its commonality. Two other causes of regret were “it just doesn’t feel right” [21%] and "I was pressured into using it" [20%].

    The Independent ~ http://tinyurl.com/jrcpfre

    Two names that parents might regret in recent times are "Elsa" (made ...[text shortened]... names chosen in recent times might have become - or be soon set to become - a source of regret?
    Over the vociferous protestations of their mother, I named all six of my children.
    The only compromise on the topic was middle names: I loathe them, find them pretentious and unnecessary.
    So three of the kids ended up with a middle name, three did not.
    The names I chose were a bit of a sore topic at first: soundly rejected, each and every one of them.
    But I was resolute in the campaign, held sway.
    Each of the names completely fit their personality and overall demeanor; all of them are unique without being burdened by irony or caught in the drain of hipster-ism.

    One of the girls tried for a stretch to change her given name, but ultimately gave up.
    She eventually came to the conclusion that "Sunshine Princess" likely wasn't going to bode well for the rest of her life after the age of six, returned to her given name ever since.
  7. SubscriberKewpieonline
    since 1-Feb-07
    Joined
    20 Jan '09
    Moves
    322269
    24 Sep '16 10:46
    An Australian study of name choices found that the lower the socio-economic status of the parents, the more likely that the child would be given an unusual or strangely-spelt name. It was theorised that these parents had few opportunities to provide much for their kids, and the overdone name was an attempt to give them something uniquely theirs.
  8. Unknown Territories
    Joined
    05 Dec '05
    Moves
    20408
    24 Sep '16 11:241 edit
    Originally posted by Kewpie
    An Australian study of name choices found that the lower the socio-economic status of the parents, the more likely that the child would be given an unusual or strangely-spelt name. It was theorised that these parents had few opportunities to provide much for their kids, and the overdone name was an attempt to give them something uniquely theirs.
    Spot on.
    My folks were dirt poor when they started having kids.
    My full name contains 26 letters.
    Not only do I never use my middle name for anything, I am called by an abbreviated form of my first.
    They saw that name on a plaque at a doctor's office; thought it would bestow a certain panache.
    They were wrong.
    I'm just a well-off hillbilly.
Back to Top