General Forum

General Forum

  1. Joined
    12 Nov '06
    Moves
    74124
    23 Oct '16 06:371 edit
    Once you pop you just can't stop, And how could you given that nothing satisfies or indeed can ever satisfy the will, which is always striving and thus suffering as long as it is not satisfied; but no satisfaction is lasting; it is only the beginning of a new striving. But there is no final goal of striving, therefore no bounds or end to suffering and for our constant struggle for more Pringles.
  2. Joined
    12 Nov '05
    Moves
    139918
    23 Oct '16 10:18
    I miss their salt and pepper flavour 🙁
  3. Joined
    07 Aug '12
    Moves
    38829
    23 Oct '16 10:56
    They are moreish and taste nice but take away their outrageously extravagant packaging and neat slim curved shape and what have you got? ...Just a cheap old dressed up spud.
  4. Joined
    10 Jan '08
    Moves
    10317
    23 Oct '16 14:48
    Originally posted by drewnogal
    They are moreish and taste nice but take away their outrageously extravagant packaging and neat slim curved shape and what have you got? ...Just a cheap old dressed up spud.
    I would call Pringles many things, cheap would not be one of them.

    They are good though.

    Do you know those boxes of wine guns, jelly babies and Bertie Bassetts that cost £2-3 in the UK depending on where and when you buy them? €6 in Dublin. Cheapest I've seen €4. Rip off Ireland.
  5. SubscriberPonderable
    chemist
    Linkenheim
    Joined
    22 Apr '05
    Moves
    526108
    24 Oct '16 13:40
    Originally posted by KnightStalker47
    Once you pop you just can't stop, And how could you given that nothing satisfies or indeed can ever satisfy the will, which is always striving and thus suffering as long as it is not satisfied; but no satisfaction is lasting; it is only the beginning of a new striving. But there is no final goal of striving, therefore no bounds or end to suffering and for our constant struggle for more Pringles.
    Just think about that they make all those uniform "Chips" using mash...seems unnatural to me.
  6. Dumnonia
    Joined
    16 Feb '08
    Moves
    88310
    24 Oct '16 16:38
    Originally posted by KnightStalker47
    Once you pop you just can't stop, And how could you given that nothing satisfies or indeed can ever satisfy the will, which is always striving and thus suffering as long as it is not satisfied; but no satisfaction is lasting; it is only the beginning of a new striving. But there is no final goal of striving, therefore no bounds or end to suffering and for our constant struggle for more Pringles.
    They put stuff in them which is addictive.
  7. Joined
    07 Aug '12
    Moves
    38829
    25 Oct '16 00:01
    Originally posted by divegeester
    They put stuff in them which is addictive.
    I've heard that cat food can be addictive...
    Just to cats of course.
  8. SubscriberVery Rusty
    Treat Everyone Equal
    Halifax, Nova Scotia
    Joined
    04 Oct '06
    Moves
    421713
    25 Oct '16 00:12
    Originally posted by divegeester
    They put stuff in them which is addictive.
    Dive,
    You should see the long line ups at Tim's down here. People are truely addicted to drinking it. We have a lot of Tim Horton's in our area, I must look that up sometime.

    Regards,
    -VR
  9. SubscriberPonderable
    chemist
    Linkenheim
    Joined
    22 Apr '05
    Moves
    526108
    28 Oct '16 11:06
    Originally posted by Silverstriker
    I miss their salt and pepper flavour 🙁
    Application of Salt and Pepper would be an Action I would find myself capable of performing.
  10. Joined
    29 Dec '08
    Moves
    6788
    28 Oct '16 15:131 edit
    Originally posted by Ponderable
    Just think about that they make all those uniform "Chips" using mash...seems unnatural to me.
    They are labeled as crisps ,not chips.

    There's more to it:

    ://io9.gizmodo.com/5851487/how-are-pringles-made

    The shocking true story of how Pringles are made

    Pringles may be one of the most sci-fi foods of our time. So thin, so homogeneous, so regularly shaped that they can be stacked perfectly, these chips are truly the food of the future. But how are they made?

    First, to understand what Pringles (and other stackable chips) are, you have to develop a Zen detachment from the idea of potato chips coming from actual potatoes in any recognizable way. In fact, the Pringles company once argued that their high amount of processing and low potato content actually made Pringles technically not potato chips. (For those wondering, they made this self-sabotaging argument to avoid taxes. 'Snacks' are recognized as necessary in the UK, and so they aren't taxed. Potato chips, on the other hand, are luxury food, and so they are taxed.)

    Instead of shaving bits off of a potato and deep frying them, the company starts with a slurry of rice, wheat, corn, and potato flakes and presses them into shape. So these potato chips aren't really potato at all. The snack-dough is then rolled out like a sheet of ultra-thin cookie dough and cut into chip-cookies by a machine. The cut is complete enough that the chips are fully free of the extra dough, which is lifted away from the chips by a machine.

    The chips move forward on a conveyor belt until they're pressed onto molds, which give them the curve that makes them fit into one another. Those molds move through boiling oil (I would have thought rat-lard, since anything that tastes that addictive has to be terrible for you, but it's probably just vegetable oil.), and fry for a few seconds. Then they're blown dry, sprayed with powdered flavors, and at last, flipped onto a slower-moving conveyor belt in a way that allows them to stack. From then on, it's into the cans (with usually a good inch of empty space at the top) and off towards the innocent mouths of the consumers.
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