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General Forum

  1. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
    That's Why I Drink
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    01 Jan '06
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    33672
    14 Feb '16 10:09
    Interesting article, indeed, and quite appropriate for the
    consumerist Valentine's mumbo jumbo.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2016/02/i-love-you-language-valentines-day/462306/

    Indeed, I've always felt baffled by how easy is for Americans to
    say they "love" something, even the most profane thing. It
    cheapens the hell out of it, if you ask me.
  2. Joined
    10 May '07
    Moves
    10128
    14 Feb '16 10:312 edits
    Swedes my age that I know - friends and relatives - would only use that expression to sweethearts, partners, husband/wives. We are gradually getting 'Americanised' though and young people here say that to almost anyone they like.

    And they often say 'I love you' - not 'Jag älskar dej'. 🙂
  3. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
    That's Why I Drink
    Joined
    01 Jan '06
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    33672
    14 Feb '16 15:13
    The post that was quoted here has been removed
    Ha! I like you too 😛

    No, only with my parents and my significant other. I've said it quite few times
    in my life, to be honest. I mean, I love Ben & Jerry's, sure, but I don't love
    Ben & Jerry's, if you know what I mean 😀
  4. Standard memberSeitse
    Doug Stanhope
    That's Why I Drink
    Joined
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    33672
    14 Feb '16 15:15
    Originally posted by lolof
    We are gradually getting 'Americanised' though and young people here say that to almost anyone they like.
    A shame, really. Cultural imperialism would be explainable from a strong, rich
    society in intellectual terms, but when it is a weak, dumbed down one, and
    pushed through wealth, it kind of hurts. Damn be money and its power.
  5. Standard memberGrampy Bobby
    Boston Lad
    USA
    Joined
    14 Jul '07
    Moves
    43012
    14 Feb '16 17:04
    Originally posted by Seitse
    Interesting article, indeed, and quite appropriate for the
    consumerist Valentine's mumbo jumbo.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2016/02/i-love-you-language-valentines-day/462306/

    Indeed, I've always felt baffled by how easy is for Americans to
    say they "love" something, even the most profane thing. It
    cheapens the hell out of it, if you ask me.
    In the culture of the United Kingdom five hundred years ago, I believe the words "I love you" expressed by a young man to a young woman were viewed as trifling with her affections. "Cherish" was then the most authentic and meaningful word for romantic love which today has morphed into charity and charitable. One of my own favorite feminine first names is Cheryl along with other feminine names which contain the upper and/or lower case letters L/l or M/n or N/n.
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