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W and Y

SubscriberJS357
General 23 Dec '17 13:57
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    23 Dec '17 13:57
    I remember being taught that in English, the vowels are “a, e, i, o, and u, and sometimes w and y.”

    Can you think of words in which w and y are consonants? Can you think of words in which they are vowels? What is the rule for deciding? What are examples of how they are treated differently depending on which they are? No fair googling.
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    23 Dec '17 15:00
    Originally posted by @js357
    I remember being taught that in English, the vowels are “a, e, i, o, and u, and sometimes w and y.”

    Can you think of words in which w and y are consonants? Can you think of words in which they are vowels? What is the rule for deciding? What are examples of how they are treated differently depending on which they are? No fair googling.
    "W" a vowel? That's a new one for me.
  3. Arch Stantons Grave
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    23 Dec '17 15:011 edit
    Originally posted by @js357
    I remember being taught that in English, the vowels are “a, e, i, o, and u, and sometimes w and y.”

    Can you think of words in which w and y are consonants? Can you think of words in which they are vowels? What is the rule for deciding? What are examples of how they are treated differently depending on which they are? No fair googling.
    Why ?
  4. Gothenburg
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    23 Dec '17 15:08
    Originally posted by @great-big-stees
    "W" a vowel? That's a new one for me.
    I didn't know that either. What words can that be?
  5. SubscriberLEUR
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    23 Dec '17 15:121 edit
    Originally posted by @js357
    I remember being taught that in English, the vowels are “a, e, i, o, and u, and sometimes w and y.”

    Can you think of words in which w and y are consonants? Can you think of words in which they are vowels? What is the rule for deciding? What are examples of how they are treated differently depending on which they are? No fair googling.
    No fair saying no fair googling...I am older than you and probably more forgetful but my memory is that only the y is sometimes a vowel.
    Never saw anybody buy a Y
    On Wheel Of Fortune
    I wonder why
    Oh, on Wheel Of Fortune
    Y oh Y
  6. Gothenburg
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    23 Dec '17 15:13
    Originally posted by @leur
    No fair saying no fair googling...I am older than you and probably more forgetful but my memory is that only the y is [b]sometimes a vowel. Never saw anybody buy a Y
    On Wheel Of Fortune
    I wonder why
    Oh, on Wheel Of Fortune
    Y oh Y[/b]
    We have no problem with 'y' - it's the vowel 'w' we are wondering about.
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    23 Dec '17 15:29
    Originally posted by @torunn
    We have no problem with 'y' - it's the vowel 'w' we are wondering about.
    Now this is just "a shot in the dark" (no not the movie with Audrey Hepburn 🙁) but, back in the day in the English language, like in Shakeseare's time, could a "w" have indeed been a vowel?
  8. Gothenburg
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    23 Dec '17 15:352 edits
    Originally posted by @great-big-stees
    Now this is just "a shot in the dark" (no not the movie with Audrey Hepburn 🙁) but, back in the day in the English language, like in Shakeseare's time, could a "w" have indeed been a vowel?
    I suppose it might have. There were vowel shifts during that period, I believe. I will have a look.
  9. Subscribersonhouse
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    23 Dec '17 16:02
    Originally posted by @torunn
    I didn't know that either. What words can that be?
    Low, Bow come to mind.

    From Dictionary.com:

    “Cwm” (a steep-walled semicircular basin in a mountain, sometimes containing a lake; a cirque) and “crwth” (an ancient Celtic musical instrument), both from the Welsh, use w as a vowel – standing for the same sound that oo stands for in boom and booth. “Crwth” is also spelled “crowd.”

    However, in words like “low” and “bow,” one can make a good case that the letter w represents a vowel. Both of these words end with one or another of the diphthongs of modern English. In each case, the second part of the diphthong is represented by w.

    By the way, l, m, n, and r may also sometimes represent vowels; that is, in English there are vowels that are routinely represented by these letters. They show up at the ends of the words “bottle,” “bottom,” “button,” and “butter.”
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    23 Dec '17 16:05
    Originally posted by @torunn
    We have no problem with 'y' - it's the vowel 'w' we are wondering about.
    Ok, google away, but only if you were born at least 3 weeks prior to V-E day.

    Pre-google thoughts. I’m skipping these ‘marks.’

    Y as in lucky, pronounced as long e or ee, as in rehab, meet. Usually at the end of words, but how is yttrium pronounced?

    I too, am puzzled by w. Is it as in who?

    As for usage, we speak of a young man, not an young man, treating the y as a consonant. But some speak of an historian, not a historian, so is that h a vowel to those folks?

    We speak of a wedding, not an wedding. I can’t come up with a w word wherein the w is treated as a vowel. What is it in howl, bowel etc? For that matter, in vowel?🙂 We speak of an owl, but that’s for the o.
  11. Subscribercoquette
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    23 Dec '17 16:46
    Never heard that w could be a vowel.

    j started as the fourth i in roman numerals. As in iiij for iiii.

    Ius are the first three letters of Jesus. Iusus.
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    23 Dec '17 16:57
    Originally posted by @coquette
    Never heard that w could be a vowel.

    j started as the fourth i in roman numerals. As in iiij for iiii.

    Ius are the first three letters of Jesus. Iusus.
    OK, now we're getting way too far into "words/letters" 😉
  13. Standard memberHandyAndy
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    23 Dec '17 17:30
    W can be a vowel in some Welsh words, e.g., crwth.
  14. Standard memberHandyAndy
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    23 Dec '17 17:44
    Originally posted by @great-big-stees
    OK, now we're getting way too far into "words/letters" 😉
    Are you the thread monitor?
  15. Subscribersonhouse
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    23 Dec '17 18:34
    Originally posted by @handyandy
    Are you the thread monitor?
    Hey man, nice threads you got there.....
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