Adjudication

Standard memberpikejohn
Help 05 Jul '14 12:56
  1. Joined
    10 May '12
    Moves
    18494
    05 Jul '14 12:56
    Is there any way to get a game adjudicated? The game has been a dead draw for 40 moves. My opponent admits it's a draw but says he is only playing waiting for me to make a mistake. The game is over 70 moves could go 100 more before I can force a 3 time repetition.
  2. USA New Mexico
    Joined
    05 Nov '11
    Moves
    47501
    06 Jul '14 06:43
    Originally posted by pikejohn
    Is there any way to get a game adjudicated? The game has been a dead draw for 40 moves. My opponent admits it's a draw but says he is only playing waiting for me to make a mistake. The game is over 70 moves could go 100 more before I can force a 3 time repetition.
    I run into similar issues sometimes. But since it's only a game...it's not really a bonafide chess club here after all...I just resign. No stress, just let those types of "players" (questionable) continue on the same path as the Greek's Sisyphus, pushing that boulder over and again. LOL
  3. Donationmwmiller
    RHP Member No.16
    Joined
    25 Feb '01
    Moves
    60712
    06 Jul '14 12:26
    You can claim a drawn game in accordance with the 50 move rule. I tried to verify this in the site FAQ but for me that isn't currently working, but I do believe this rule is applicable here at RHP.

    Also remember that it isn't automatic. You would have to claim the draw when you feel that it applies to your game. If you're not sure, just go ahead and make the claim. If the conditions have not been met, nothing will happen and the game will go on. But you have to make the claim.

    From wikipedia:
    "The fifty-move rule in chess states that a player can claim a draw if no capture has been made and no pawn has been moved in the last fifty moves (for this purpose a "move" consists of a player completing his turn followed by his opponent completing his turn). The purpose of this rule is to prevent a player with no chance of winning from obstinately continuing to play indefinitely (Hooper & Whyld 1992:134), or seeking to win purely by tiring the opponent out."