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  1. 29 Nov '08 19:36
    How in the world did this happen?
    In a French Exchange, no less ???



    I was looking at some French Exchange games and came across this.
    How did black go down so fast?
  2. Donation !~TONY~!
    1...c5!
    29 Nov '08 19:43
    It seems as though after ...Bf5 the game basically ended by force, although don't hold me to that. Maybe ...Nce7 was better?
  3. 29 Nov '08 20:21
    Originally posted by !~TONY~!
    It seems as though after ...Bf5 the game basically ended by force, although don't hold me to that. Maybe ...Nce7 was better?
    Yes, but how does a player of this caliber lose by force so quickly. That is what amazes me.
  4. 29 Nov '08 20:23
    What was Qf6 all about?
  5. 29 Nov '08 20:28
    Originally posted by thadeusman
    What was Qf6 all about?
    It may be to prevent Bf4, which is played in this variation sometimes.
  6. 29 Nov '08 20:49 / 1 edit
    These things can happen - one slip against a good player and
    it does not matter how good you are - you are gone.

    (I noticed the game was played in 1995, was Beliavsky graded 2600 then?)

    I've just posted some silly quick losses on my site from the recent Open Olympiad.
    Three of the four players who lost are over 2100. In one case the loser was 2499.

    In these instances the players undoing was of their own making
    rather than any brilliant play from their opponent.

    Their opponents simply played chess and pounced upon their blunders.

    http://chessedinburgh.co.uk/chandlerarticle.php?ChandID=304
  7. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    29 Nov '08 21:07
    According to my database this is Short - Beliavsky, Dortmund 1995.

    Crafty agrees with !~TONY~! that 11. ... Nge7 is better (suggested move at 30s.). After that I think black has no good moves until the end: I feel the knight should go back to g6 rather than retreat all the way to c8, but Crafty doesn´t seem impressed.
  8. 29 Nov '08 21:11
    Originally posted by paulbuchmanfromfics
    It may be to prevent Bf4, which is played in this variation sometimes.
    I dont see anything wrong with ...Nf6, Bf4 0-0.
  9. 29 Nov '08 21:41
    It is more like an exchange winawer - the 'pure' exchange french begins 1.e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5

    Nice to see though, I might have a shot at that sort of thing myself someday.
  10. 29 Nov '08 22:55
    Originally posted by Tyrannosauruschex
    It is more like an exchange winawer - the 'pure' exchange french begins 1.e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5

    Nice to see though, I might have a shot at that sort of thing myself someday.
    I have played some games with the French Exchange.
    (1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5) The games have been pretty interesting, with a lot of maneuvering. I don't think one of them has really been a draw. 3.Nc3 and then 4.exd5 can be an improved form. After 3. ... Bb4 the bishop is commited to what may turn out to be a bad square.
    After 3. ... Nf6 4.exd5 exd5 5.Bg5 is an option. Black usually doesn't let white get this setup. I read somewhere that the delayed exchange may in fact be better (In the 3. ... Nf6 variation). It may be Lasker or someone that said it. I forget. The thing that I like about it is that you have some nice open lines for your bishops. Also you don't have to play e5 and defend that strongpoint for a long time. Being a French player, from the black side, I like that. The Petroff is the same exact pawn structure and many interesting games come from it too. Try it in a game or two.
  11. 29 Nov '08 23:13
    whenever I get into the exchange variation I seem to get into an interesting game with opposite side castling.
  12. 30 Nov '08 01:04
    Yeah, if black wants to make a game of it then he castles queenside and white castles kingside and an almighty hackfest begins.
    I have even played such moves as Kf1, h4, Rh3 for white - just to give my king a little additional safety while I am attacking.
  13. 30 Nov '08 01:04
    Yeah, if black wants to make a game of it then he castles queenside and white castles kingside and an almighty hackfest begins.
    I have even played such moves as Kf1, h4, Rh3 for white - just to give my king a little additional safety while I am attacking.
  14. Standard member Nowakowski
    10. O-O
    30 Nov '08 05:42 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Tyrannosauruschex
    It is more like an exchange winawer - the 'pure' exchange french begins 1.e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5

    Nice to see though, I might have a shot at that sort of thing myself someday.
    Yes... it was almost like it was trying to discourage Qg4 which is sometimes played early in this "exchange winawer"... and actually is commonly played in the french in multiple variations... i'm not sure what his preperation was trying to discourage, but it seems clear it didn't work here... i find it funny that the white pieces would run from the winawer in the first place.
  15. Standard member JonathanB of London
    Curb Your Enthusiasm
    30 Nov '08 09:20
    Originally posted by paulbuchmanfromfics
    How in the world did this happen?
    In a French Exchange, no less ???
    Well, as you say lower down the thread, there's no reason at all why the French Exchange should be dull.

    Actually it's my favourite opening! For a whole bunch more 'interesting' French Exchanges ...

    http://streathambrixtonchess.blogspot.com/search?q=Interesting+French+Exchange