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  1. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    25 Apr '12 14:00 / 4 edits
    Hi all,

    Greenpawn34 inspired me to share this with his Kramnik-Aronian game post.

    This is another Polar Bear game I found while studying, and I thought it worth sharing, as it is an excellent thematic example of the "Benoni" Jump attack against a kingside fianchettoed position.

    The player of the black pieces is not of the same calibre as the GM playing white, but I think that it just goes to show that thematic, "stock" attacking ideas are very much a part of the GM repertoire, and that they do not miss opportunities when they occur.

    I culled the game from a database without notes, so all the notes are my own, along with any errors in them!

    EDIT: I am having pgn issues- I'll try to resolve it as best I can. Sorry!


  2. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    25 Apr '12 15:37 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    Hi all,

    Greenpawn34 inspired me to share this with his Kramnik-Aronian game post.

    This is another Polar Bear game I found while studying, and I thought it worth sharing, as it is an excellent thematic example of the "Benoni" Jump attack against a kingside fianchettoed position.

    The player of the black pieces is not of the same calibre as the GM e the rook to g5 after the king goes to g8.} 1-0[/pgn]
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    I suck. Here are the moves, at least!

    [Event "Bansko op"]
    [Site "Bansko"]
    [Date "2010.12.13"]
    [Round "1"]
    [White "Danielsen, Henrik"]
    [Black "Atanasova, Elitsa"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "A02"]
    [WhiteElo "2516"]
    [BlackElo "1748"]
    [PlyCount "51"]
    [EventDate "2010.12.13"]
    [EventType "swiss"]
    [EventRounds "9"]
    [EventCountry "BUL"]
    [Source "ChessBase"]
    [SourceDate "2010.12.28"]

    1. f4 Nf6 2. Nf3 c5 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. O-O O-O 6. d3 d5 7. c3 Nc6 8. Na3
    Re8 9. Nh4 e5 10. f5 Qe7 11. Bg5 Rd8 12. Qd2 a6 13. Rad1 Rd6 14. Qc1 Rb8 15. e4
    dxe4 16. dxe4 b5 17. Nc2 Bb7 18. Ne3{This moves begins an excellent example
    of a "Benoni Jump", which is a well-known attacking motif against a kingside
    fianchetto position. It involves a knight sacrifice or combination based on
    the f5 square and opening lines around the black king.}Qc7{This move
    irreparably weakens the f6 square, and the d5-square by association, since the
    f6 knight protects it. Note that since white has a rook and bishop attacking
    f6, another rook attacking d6, a knight ready to land on d5 forking c7 and f6,
    the queen and bishop controlling the c1-h6 diagonal, and also a pair of
    knights ready to execute the Benoni Jump, the entire position is ripe for a
    game-ending combination.}19. fxg6{This is winning, but it may not even be
    the best move! White can also exchange his bishop on f6 or his rook on d6 with play on the d5 and f6 squares. The position is ripe with possibilities.}hxg6
    20. Rxd6 Qxd6 21. Nhf5 {Here is our Benoni Jump in action.}gxf5 22. Nxf5 Qf8 23. Nxg7 Qxg724. Bxf6 Six moves later, we see how the GM exploits the weakness of the f6 square caused by his opponent's 18th move.}Qg6 25. Rf5 Suddenly the threat of Rg5 appears, and the game is over.}Kf8 26. Qd2{The coming check on d6 is devastating, as white will capture e5 with his rook of the king goes to e8, or
    slide the rook to g5 after the king goes to g8.} 1-0
  3. 25 Apr '12 20:52 / 1 edit
    You have no move number for Black after a note.

    21. Nhf5 {Here is our Benoni Jump in action.}gxf5

    Should be

    21. Nhf5 {Here is our Benoni Jump in action.} 21...gxf5

  4. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    27 Apr '12 01:37
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    You have no move number for Black after a note.

    21. Nhf5 {Here is our Benoni Jump in action.}gxf5

    Should be

    21. Nhf5 {Here is our Benoni Jump in action.} 21...gxf5

    [pgn]
    1. f4 Nf6 2. Nf3 c5 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. O-O O-O 6. d3 d5 7. c3 Nc6 8. Na3 Re8 9. Nh4 e5 10. f5 Qe7 11. Bg5 Rd8 12. Qd2 a6 13. Rad1 Rd6 14. Qc1 Rb8 15. e4 dxe4 16. dxe4 ...[text shortened]... h his rook of the king goes to e8, or slide the rook to g5 after the king goes to g8.}[/pgn]
    As usual, you are the man! Thanks!