Please turn on javascript in your browser to play chess.
Only Chess Forum

Only Chess Forum

  1. 29 May '13 12:37 / 2 edits
    A game of Jonny Hector's that I thought I would share. There are no comments from me because this is way over my head! I have no idea what is going on, but it is amazing.

    Jonny Hector vs Per Vernersson, Swedish Championship 2001.

  2. 29 May '13 21:52
    I'll give a bash at noting it up.
    Hector, Sax and Vanganian games are always worth playing over.

    J. Hector - P. Vernersson Sweden 2001



    Now we look at the original Knight sacrifice.




    And finally Game No 8632718 which was mentioned in the notes to the first game.

    WhiteHorses - kapatidnapogi RHP 2012

  3. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    29 May '13 22:43
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    [b]I'll give a bash at noting it up.
    Hector, Sax and Vanganian games are always worth playing over.
    Thumbs up and worth repeating! As soon as I saw Hector's name in the title, I opened this thread immediately.

    He plays with energy and has his own unique style. A book of his best games would be a great read.
  4. Subscriber moonbus
    Uber-Nerd
    30 May '13 14:15
    Thanks for the notes. BTW, the pgn leading this thread gives the result as 0-1; when I saw the result I was puzzled (mate in two--even I can see that far ahead). Maybe the pgn should be corrected.

    Is anyone at the forum familiar with games of Julius/Gyula Breyer? He had a similar style, it seems to me--very unusual ideas.
  5. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    30 May '13 21:49
    Originally posted by moonbus
    Thanks for the notes. BTW, the pgn leading this thread gives the result as 0-1; when I saw the result I was puzzled (mate in two--even I can see that far ahead). Maybe the pgn should be corrected.

    Is anyone at the forum familiar with games of Julius/Gyula Breyer? He had a similar style, it seems to me--very unusual ideas.
    Breyer features prominently in Reti's Modern Ideas in Chess. He may well have been the first truly hypermodern player.
  6. Standard member caissad4
    Child of the Novelty
    31 May '13 01:04
    Originally posted by Paul Leggett
    Breyer features prominently in Reti's Modern Ideas in Chess. He may well have been the first truly hypermodern player.
    "After 1.P-K4 whites game is in its last throes" Julius Breyer
  7. 31 May '13 01:49
    "After 1.P-K4 whites game is in its last throes"

    After quoting this in Modern Chess Ideas Reti added:

    Credo quia absurdum

    Which translates to "I believe because it is absurd."
  8. Standard member Exuma
    Anansi
    31 May '13 10:56
    Thanks for the lead on Breyer. Somehow I have not seen and played through these games. Really really difficult and interesting.

    The first one I looked at on chessgames - this comes up -



    So from this position, why is it that black should not play NxN, and after pxN, QxN?

    Thus -


    I see that if the bishop on d2 was not there, then Qd7 is mate. I see that the bishop has a free move because of that threat. The problem is that black has Qd5, and if the white Q goes somewhere else the R on d1 is hanging. What am I missing? In the actual game black played 0-0-0 instead of taking the e-pawn
  9. 31 May '13 14:34 / 2 edits
    Hi Exuma

    You have to weigh these things up OTB very carefully.
    An attacking player would offer that pawn without much thought.
    They have a history of offering such pawns (who was White?...Infact who were the players?)
    he knows the coming defence is difficult for Black.
    He will get play for that pawn.

    Black may have just rejected it because he saw the difficulties and
    after 0-0-0 theatened to take it.
    (The threat very often being stronger than the execution.)

    He may not have picked his through the maze and decided it was not worth a pawn.

    (Also, I don't know, it may be a theorectical pawn sac by White.)

    However Lasker (and we will meet him again in a minute) writes
    any centre pawn is always worth a bit of trouble.

    All these maxims, quotes and rules of thumb.
    Each one appears to have a counter rule of thumb.
    Is it any wonder we are running around like headless chickens.

    Winter writes that he once thought for ages (35 minutes if I recall)
    before saccing a piece v Lasker. Lasker ignored it and replied within a
    minute.

    After the game Winter asked why did you not take the piece. Lasker replied.

    "If a good player offers a piece sacrifice after 35 minutes thought it must
    be good. You can keep the piece I'll keep the 35 minutes."

    Or words to that effect, I cannot remember it word for word. Lasker won.

    So let us have a quick look at what perhaps Black saw...
    (though I think they just said "No Thank You." without much thought.)



    This is the other line the Black player would have to look at.

  10. Subscriber sonhouse
    Fast and Curious
    31 May '13 15:36 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    I'll give a bash at noting it up.
    Hector, Sax and Vanganian games are always worth playing over.

    [b]J. Hector - P. Vernersson
    Sweden 2001

    [pgn]
    1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 {It very rarely matters if you play this or 3.Nc3 Black usually plays....} 3... dxe4 {....this to either move.} 4. Nxe4 Nd7 {4...Bf5 is more popular but the text has it's band e7 8. Ng5xf7 Ke8xf7 9. Qe2xe6 Kf7g6 10. Bc4d3[/pgn][/b]
    In that opening, what is wrong with stopping that whole affair with 3 ed, cd and then 4 c4 making it more like a queen's gambit? That works the same against the french also. Is there some underlying fault with that system?
  11. Standard member Exuma
    Anansi
    31 May '13 17:46 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    Hi Exuma

    You have to weigh these things up OTB very carefully.
    An attacking player would offer that pawn without much thought.
    They have a history of offering such pawns (who was White?...Infact who were the players?)
    he knows the coming defence is difficult for Black.
    He will get play for that pawn.
    Ah my apologies - the game was Gyula Breyer v Ziolo 1911. Thanks for the notes - that Bg5 is crafty
    Here is the full game -