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  1. 22 Mar '09 00:04 / 1 edit
    I was just wondering if someone could help out. I played a game ages ago against a decent enough player here and I moved I think e4 then f3.

    He plodded along taking all my pieces so I messaged him in the game, " At least your having fun". He said something about that pawn move, f3, and smelling blood.

    I was just looking at a mate's game from even longer ago and he played it so it rang a bell. Had a quick search and can't find why it's bad, just a bit of f3 as the first move. I know I should get a book but if someone could explain....

    Cheers
  2. 22 Mar '09 00:14 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Roosty
    I was just wondering if someone could help out. I played a game ages ago against a decent enough player here and I moved I think e4 then f3.

    He plodded along taking all my pieces so I messaged him in the game, " At least your having fun". He said something about that pawn move, f3, and smelling blood.

    I was just looking at a mate's game from even 3 as the first move. I know I should get a book but if someone could explain....

    Cheers
    I'm not sure I know all the intricacies, but generally it weakens your king's defenses. Black will be looking to play his queen to h4 with check if given a chance. If you misplace your pieces and don't defend well, the h4 queen check could be a disaster for White.

    Edit - Oh, also, even later in the game after you've castled kingside, with your pawn not on its f2 square, your king is vulnerable to bishop or queen attacks along the a7-g1 diagonal.

    Edit 2 - Also, maybe you should get familiar with Damiano's Defense. Black sometimes suffers after he plays 2...f6, but the same principle applies to 2.f3, where White can get in trouble in sort of a reverse Damiano Defense.
  3. 22 Mar '09 00:26
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    I'm not sure I know all the intricacies, but generally it weakens your king's defenses. Black will be looking to play his queen to h4 with check if given a chance. If you misplace your pieces and don't defend well, the h4 queen check could be a disaster for White.

    Edit - Oh, also, even later in the game after you've castled kingside, with your pawn not o ...[text shortened]... its f2 square, your king is vulnerable to bishop or queen attacks along the a7-g1 diagonal.
    Yeah that's it, remember he went Q to h4 and I was in a right mess. I think I've stayed away from it since but cheers for the heads up on what I should be thinking about.

    Thanks again
  4. Standard member peacedog
    Highlander
    22 Mar '09 00:27
    Don’t know the half of it but the biggest problem is it weakens King, open to checks ect. Also its not a developing move or one that aids development or hinders your opponent. In fact it hinders your own development by denying your knight a good square.
  5. 22 Mar '09 00:35
    Originally posted by peacedog
    Don’t know the half of it but the biggest problem is it weakens King, open to checks ect. Also its not a developing move or one that aids development or hinders your opponent. In fact it hinders your own development by denying your knight a good square.
    Cheers, at least I played it against someone who knew enough about how to take advantage of it. His comment stuck with me
  6. 22 Mar '09 00:37
    Originally posted by peacedog
    In fact it hinders your own development by denying your knight a good square.
    Yeah, I forgot to mention that. It definitely causes problems with how to develop your kingside knight. The reason why the King's Gambit isn't really bad for White is that after 1.e4 e5 2.f4, White can still play Nf3, and the knight on f3 covers the important h4 square, preventing any possible queen check from Black.
  7. 22 Mar '09 00:51
    To your edits Mad Rook, I really didn't get into the game I was torn apart and just did my bit to watch how it should be done right.

    I never play the King's Gambit but read I think on these here pages that I should accept, I think I read only a minimal dissent. I rarely see it in my games but I do see the Queen's Gambit, and sadly using my transitive logic I accept those too.

    Give me a gambit I'll have it.

    Thoughts, ..... I just joined a library so will get a book for sure, I promise.
  8. 22 Mar '09 01:11 / 2 edits
    1.f3 Robs the King's Knight of it's best square and White will
    spend precious opening tempo sorting out his Kingside.

    It may expose the King to Qh4+ which in turn can lead to further unhappiness.

    But worse than anything, it does not hinder your opponents development
    in any way at all.
    Black has practically the better game just by playing simple moves.

    look at:

    http://www.timeforchess.com/gamesexplorer/?movelist=f2f3e7e5e2e4&flip=0&co=-&u=-1&c=1400

    The table on the right shows impressive figures for Black wins based
    on games played at this site starting with 1.f3

    Here is one - note White's clever we trick forcing both Rooks onto
    unprotected sqaures than forking them.

  9. 22 Mar '09 19:56
    Originally posted by Roosty
    I was just wondering if someone could help out. I played a game ages ago against a decent enough player here and I moved I think e4 then f3.

    He plodded along taking all my pieces so I messaged him in the game, " At least your having fun". He said something about that pawn move, f3, and smelling blood.

    I was just looking at a mate's game from even ...[text shortened]... 3 as the first move. I know I should get a book but if someone could explain....

    Cheers
    It's called The King's Head Variation.

    Here is a quote from the Chessmaster opening book: 2.f3 is an inferior move which deprives White's g1-Knight of its best and most aggressive square. White is defending against an attack threat on the e4-pawn before it occurs rather than creating attack threats himself.

    I hope this helps.
  10. Standard member zozozozo
    Thread Killing Chimp
    22 Mar '09 20:21 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    1.f3 Robs the King's Knight of it's best square
    best?
    Its a bit more to the center, thats why u think its better then Ne2?
  11. 22 Mar '09 22:30
    Originally posted by zozozozo
    best?
    Its a bit more to the center, thats why u think its better then Ne2?
    Nf3 controls two or the four central squares, while Nd2 only controls one of the four. Also, Nd2 will block in the king's bishop unless the bishop is moved out first or fianchettoed.
  12. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    West Coast Represent
    23 Mar '09 00:10
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    Nf3 controls two or the four central squares, while Nd2 only controls one of the four. Also, Nd2 will block in the king's bishop unless the bishop is moved out first or fianchettoed.
    Also, a N at d2 only attacks six squares instead of eight.
  13. 23 Mar '09 05:24
    Well, it is not foced that you will lose the control of that case forever.

    but, Do you want to lose, time.


    1. f3 1... e4,

    give you trouble, So 2. e3,m (Qh4 + is just bad ). d4 or f4, or c4, but then white play f4.

    So you have lost one tempi, you play with the black pieces, a good way of playing. this is great.


    Do you hate your extra tempi to lose it?