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  1. Standard member MetBierOp
    Dutch
    05 Sep '09 18:50 / 3 edits
    Last monday I played this game OTB


    This game I played as white.
    I've done some analysis and would like some help.


    5.a2-a4 was not necesarry

    14. Nc3-e2 seems to be a blunder, according to Fritz,
    When I played it, it felt too passive.
    However Fritz dislikes it, because of the tactic
    14...Be7-g5 15. f4xg5 Ng6xe5.

    Moves 25...Rf8xf6 & 26...Qd8xf6 are clearly oversights by my opponent, probably caused due to timetrouble.


    My questions
    - Is 14. Nc3-e2 only bad, because of the tactic?
    - Any other advice?



    -edits-
    PGN
  2. Subscriber AThousandYoung
    Gonzalo de Córdoba
    05 Sep '09 19:44
    Originally posted by MetBierOp
    Last monday I played this game OTB

    [pgn][Event "NEO Interne Competitie"]
    [Site "Bergum"]
    [Date "2009.08.31"]
    [Round "1"]
    [White "Westra, Siebren"]
    [Black "Stellema , Klaas"]
    [Result "1-0"]
    [ECO "C02"]
    [WhiteElo "1737"]
    [BlackElo "1605"]
    [Annotator "Fritz 11 (30s)"]
    [PlyCount "77"]
    [EventType "tourn"]
    [EventRounds "25"]
    [EventCountry "NET"] ...[text shortened]...
    - Any other advice?



    -edits-
    PGN
    I'm no master but I like to analyze.

    5. a4 suppresses ...b5 but gives you less leverage over the enemy black square Biship. It also makes it hard for you to protect the b Pawn when the enemy Q goes to b6 on turn 9, and

    I wonder if 14. exf5 e.p. would be a good idea. You're trying to rush his King and it's always better to break up Pawns when you're doing that. You're also brining a Knight towards your rear areas.

    Why did you take with the Knight on turn 18? That takes it from the Kingside and towards your rear, away from the enemy. Why not the Queen? Did you do it to defend against the enemy N on b3? Again, a4 bites you in the butt.

    Yeah, turn 14 changed the game from you having initiative to Black having initiative. You got it back by move 22 though.
  3. 05 Sep '09 20:39
    Why not analyse it thoroughly first, bring it here for analysis, and THEN consult fritz?
  4. Standard member MetBierOp
    Dutch
    05 Sep '09 20:56
    Hello AThousendYoung,

    and thanks

    I not often fear Qxb2
    For example move 14...Qxb2? 15.Rb1 Qa3 16.Bc1 Qa2 17 Nc3 1-0

    When there is not a Queen winning combination,
    then Ra1-b1, Qb2-anywhere, Rb1xb7 often wins back the pawn and causes stress in the black camp.

    I thought about 14. exf5 e.p.
    And you might be right. I will look deeper into this.

    At that moment I could not see/calculate a winning attack after exf5 e.p.,
    after 14...Bxf6 I thought that black is fine.
    His bishops become stronger and my extra space on the kingside is nullified
    I was not willing to give up my kingside space, which was going to give me attacking options if the center remained closed for then.


    Yes Nb3 is no fun, besides that, I also wanted my Queen to have the e1-h4 Diagonal, (Played 17.Qe1 for this purpose)
    Especially for the possibility of the future move Qg3, and because I wanted to make space for my rooks to join in the attack

    Thanks
  5. Standard member MetBierOp
    Dutch
    05 Sep '09 21:00 / 1 edit
    Hi Mister Chess

    I analysed it, then used Fritz to assist me. (not very deeply though)

    After that I posted it here.

    What is the benefit of changing the above order?
  6. 05 Sep '09 21:14
    Originally posted by MetBierOp
    Hi Mister Chess

    I analysed it, then used Fritz to assist me. (not very deeply though)

    After that I posted it here.

    What is the benefit of changing the above order?
    Well a box can only tell you moves you missed, it can't berate you for being a complete dummy for making that move. I mean really give you a good lashing so that you won't ever make that mistake again.
  7. Standard member MetBierOp
    Dutch
    05 Sep '09 21:37
    Originally posted by MISTER CHESS
    Well a box can only tell you moves you missed, it can't berate you for being a complete dummy for making that move. I mean really give you a good lashing so that you won't ever make that mistake again.
    lol.

    Thats so true.
    Next monday I have another OTB game, I will post it here before going true Fritz with it.
  8. 06 Sep '09 19:21
    14.Ne2 even without the tactic makes me think of a general principal that books don`t usually teach.
    Every book almost says control the centre and develop but they dont tell you to aim your pieces at the opponent and dont aim them at your self.
    Like with the Knight on c3 its good because you attack black...at d5
    but at e2 you are attacking yourself for example f4 and d4.
    even in positions not similar to this one i recomend striving to aim at the opponent and not at yourself.
    I think that should one of the handfuls of basic principals taught.
  9. 06 Sep '09 22:16
    Originally posted by National Master Dale
    14.Ne2 even without the tactic makes me think of a general principal that books don`t usually teach.
    Every book almost says control the centre and develop but they dont tell you to aim your pieces at the opponent and dont aim them at your self.
    Like with the Knight on c3 its good because you attack black...at d5
    but at e2 you are attacking yo ...[text shortened]... ponent and not at yourself.
    I think that should one of the handfuls of basic principals taught.
    What about when you are going for a pawn break? Also, the tactic was there a move before 14.Ne2.
  10. Standard member Nowakowski
    10. O-O
    07 Sep '09 03:43
    Originally posted by tomtom232
    What about when you are going for a pawn break? Also, the tactic was there a move before 14.Ne2.
    Indeed, sometimes you need to point your pieces at yourself, because
    those squares are the articles of contention. Its not so much about making
    sure that you conform to each little idiom. Its important to make sure
    that your pieces are working together, cumulative pressure. Cumulative
    is the key here, birthing an idea and then allowing your pieces to develop
    together to bare the characteristics of that idea.

    I wouldn't worry about such a small detail as this so much. Don't point
    your pieces at yourself is worthwhile part of the time, true. However its
    not something I'd keep in mind to govern my play. Instead ask yourself
    what does this piece effect? When I look at all my pieces, where do
    they all seem to point? Where is the Center of my Gravity ? Where
    is the Center of my energy??

    Finding this, and playing with this in mind is always better when your in
    a sticky spot.


    -GIN
  11. 07 Sep '09 04:26
    Originally posted by Nowakowski
    Indeed, sometimes you need to point your pieces at yourself, because
    those squares are the articles of contention. Its not so much about making
    sure that you conform to each little idiom. Its important to make sure
    that your pieces are working together, cumulative pressure. Cumulative
    is the key here, birthing an idea and then allowing your pieces ...[text shortened]... g this, and playing with this in mind is always better when your in
    a sticky spot.


    -GIN
    Yes, I don't think about any principles when I play. I just make plans and find ways to execute them sometimes getting lucky from opponent errors.