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  1. 17 Jul '13 19:18
    I have finished my 1st round games in the RHP Championship P.18 W.17 D.1 L.0

    I'm fed up at dropping the draw, I completely underestimated my opponent
    as I had won our other game in 6 moves. Still 17½/18 is OK.

    But it was this win which annoyed me.
    I did everything perfect, it was just perfect but because I used conditional
    moves I messed up what I had intended.

    Arayn - greenpawn34 RHP Ch 2013

    I refer to a 'McMurdo'. A 'McMurdo' is a move you have up your sleeve
    just when your opponent thinks the combination is over.

  2. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    18 Jul '13 14:56 / 1 edit
    New Scientist had this article a few issues ago where they talked about how we have two types of thinking, type 1 where we jump to conclusions, make mistakes but get things done quickly. Type 2 is the reflective, accurate, but slow thinker. If we relied on the second type of thinking all the time then basic tasks would take too long. The trick is to make sure that you go into sage mode and don't rely on the (efficient) idiot when it's too much for him. The end of a series of conditional moves (or a calculated line in OTB play) is just the kind of moment where the idiot will try and make a sage's decision. He "knew" you'd won and remembered the killer move, but because of his tendency of jumping to conclusions didn't check the position properly. The cure is making sure the idiot wakes up the sage (whose favorite hobby is sleeping), unfortunately I still haven't found a way of doing that.

    2. a4 can't be good, white's already committed to a pawn on e4, with the associated weakness of the e4 pawn. It makes more sense to play 1. a4 and then see what black does. I sometimes play Anderson's opening - as an antidote to booky players - white plays to prove 1. a3 is a useful move and black should try to avoid positions where the pawn on a3 contributes much and make white accept the loss of tempo. This game is the only Anderson's opening game I didn't win (except timeouts or games that didn't come up on the search or gamesexplorer), all because I let the idiot choose the move instead of waking up the sage:
  3. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    18 Jul '13 15:45
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    New Scientist had this article a few issues ago where they talked about how we have two types of thinking, type 1 where we jump to conclusions, make mistakes but get things done quickly. Type 2 is the reflective, accurate, but slow thinker. If we relied on the second type of thinking all the time then basic tasks would take too long. The trick is to m ...[text shortened]... hes his pawns I can't stop them} 1/2-1/2[/pgn]
    I like that analogy. One of my problems is that the idiot jumps back in and interrupts the sage. The idiot hears something he likes and goes "Yes! That's brilliant! Let's do it!!" before the sage can finish checking everything.
  4. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    18 Jul '13 16:42
    Originally posted by DeepThought
    New Scientist had this article a few issues ago where they talked about how we have two types of thinking, type 1 where we jump to conclusions, make mistakes but get things done quickly. Type 2 is the reflective, accurate, but slow thinker. If we relied on the second type of thinking all the time then basic tasks would take too long. The trick is to m ...[text shortened]... hes his pawns I can't stop them} 1/2-1/2[/pgn]
    To me it looks like a Reti or English opening, except for 1.a3.

    The Instructor
  5. 18 Jul '13 22:24
    Hi DeepThought.

    I try not call up the sage. When he appears we both go sac-happy.

    a6 is always a handy move in the Sicilian so a tempo up even in the
    Closed Sicilian it must be OK.

    1.e4 e5 2.a4 has one thing going for it.

    After 1. e4 e5 2. a4 Nf6 3. Nc3 Bc5 4. Bc4


    Black cannot play an Evan Reversed (4...b5) 🙂