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  1. Standard member bill718
    Enigma
    07 Mar '13 12:14 / 1 edit
    Hello- I left competitive chess awhile back, but would like to ask. Is it imporntant to have goals in chess? i.e. achieving a rating level within a time frame, studying a set number of hours a week, playing a set number of games or tournaments a year etc. I always wrote my goals on a card, and kept them where I could see them everyday. This kept me focused, and was helpful in taking my rating from 1230 to the mid 1700's in 3 years, where it remained until my interest in the game faded a few years ago (along with my rating!). Some would argue however this system was too structured, and took too much of the enjoyment away from the game. Any thoughts?
  2. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    07 Mar '13 15:11 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by bill718
    Hello- I left competitive chess awhile back, but would like to ask. Is it imporntant to have goals in chess? i.e. achieving a rating level within a time frame, studying a set number of hours a week, playing a set number of games or tournaments a year etc. I always wrote my goals on a card, and kept them where I could see them everyday. This kept me focused, system was too structured, and took too much of the enjoyment away from the game. Any thoughts?
    I work for Disney, and I have a somewhat unique perspective that might help answer this.

    Some Guests who visit our parks are meticulous in their planning. They have the park guide maps all marked up, they have itineraries planned, they know all the show times, have dinner reservations set, and hit the ground running.

    Other Guests just show up and wing it.

    As best I can tell, they all have fun, and it's about the person, not the process.

    Those who "wing it" would connect planning as too much like work, which they are trying to escape, while those who plan would go nuts "winging it" and would feel like they missed opportunities.

    I think the ultimate answer is the Socratic "know thyself".