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  1. 08 Jul '08 01:43 / 2 edits
    Black to play and win!

  2. 08 Jul '08 03:29
    Can you message me the answer?
  3. 08 Jul '08 04:37
    1. Rxb2 Nxb2 2. f3 Ne3 3. d4!+
  4. 08 Jul '08 05:21
    Originally posted by moteutsch
    1. Rxb2 Nxb2 2. f3 Ne3 3. d4!+
    Rxb2 Nxc5 for the pawn exchange, as the bishop is pinned.
    I fail to see the win.
  5. 08 Jul '08 06:45
    Originally posted by Adorea
    Rxb2 Nxc5 for the pawn exchange, as the bishop is pinned.
    I fail to see the win.
    Rxb2 Nxc5 Bxc5 check
  6. Standard member bosintang
    perpetualEditMonkey
    08 Jul '08 10:45 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by moteutsch
    1. Rxb2 Nxb2 2. f3 Ne3 3. d4!+
    I think you had the right idea but the notation is not correct.

    1...Rxb2 2. Nxb2 c3 3. Nd3 c4+! and black has a discovered check and attack on the knight, and one of the two passed pawns should have no trouble queening.
  7. 08 Jul '08 12:03
    This was a game by tal - I remember reading it in a tactics book once - it just goes to show that even with shattered pawns like those, you should never write the position off as lost.
  8. 08 Jul '08 12:12
    This was no endgame by Tal, it was either from Ortueta - Sanz, 1933 or Tylkowski - Wojciechowski, 1931.

    http://www.xs4all.nl/~timkr/chess/rxb2.htm
  9. 08 Jul '08 12:46
    Originally posted by heinzkat
    This was no endgame by Tal, it was either from Ortueta - Sanz, 1933 or Tylkowski - Wojciechowski, 1931.

    http://www.xs4all.nl/~timkr/chess/rxb2.htm
    I think this combination was shown in Nimzowich's "My System" or maybe in Capablanca's book...The first pair of players seem to be the right one.
  10. 08 Jul '08 12:59
    Originally posted by Rizhanin
    I think this combination was shown in Nimzowich's "My System" or maybe in Capablanca's book...The first pair of players seem to be the right one.
    Although the position given in this thread apparently was from the second one...!
  11. 08 Jul '08 13:13
    Originally posted by Rizhanin
    I think this combination was shown in Nimzowich's "My System" or maybe in Capablanca's book...The first pair of players seem to be the right one.
    Certainly not in My System, which was published in the 1920s.

    It is an astonishing position and I hope it really did occur in a serious game.
  12. 08 Jul '08 13:17 / 6 edits
    wow, that's a pretty amazing fact of chess history. very similar positions.

    cannot insert pgn >

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1277959

    http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1274525
  13. 08 Jul '08 13:22
    I have a breakthrough of this style from one of my real games which was inspired by this tactic - I will post it sometime when I have looked it up.
  14. Standard member adam warlock
    Baby Gauss
    08 Jul '08 13:30
    Originally posted by Fat Lady
    Certainly not in My System, which was published in the 1920s.

    It is an astonishing position and I hope it really did occur in a serious game.
    The initial position is from a real game and is featured and analysed on "Kasparov Teaches Chess". If I can find the book I'll post here the relevant information.
  15. 08 Jul '08 14:06
    It's from a real game.Possibly 2,but there's some doubt about that.You can read the story and analysis of the position here:

    http://www.xs4all.nl/~timkr/chess/rxb2.htm

    1....,Rxb2 is correct.However,it's still not that easy to queen,white has a few more tricks.
    The position I gave here is slightly altered,as it is usually given in books.Not sure why they alter it but I figured it safest to just copy it that way.In Ortueta-Sanz black had 2 extra pawns.In Tylkowski - Wojciechowski black had 1 extra pawn.
    Anyway,you can read it all at the above mentioned site.

    It's truly awesome,isn't it?