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  1. 08 Sep '08 17:55 / 1 edit
    this was so beautiful I had to share it. not too difficult though. taken from CT-Art.

    white to play and draw.
  2. 08 Sep '08 19:39
    haha, thats superb. Completely flummoxed my ageing engine
  3. 08 Sep '08 19:47
    Originally posted by diskamyl
    this was so beautiful I had to share it. not too difficult though. taken from CT-Art.
    [fen]8/8/3b2P1/6P1/1k6/8/2B1r3/1K6 w - - 0 1[/fen]
    white to play and draw.
    g7, followed by Bh7
  4. 08 Sep '08 20:04
    Originally posted by ram1977
    g7, followed by Bh7
    That was the first thing that I thought of. Passed pawns must be pushed!
  5. 08 Sep '08 20:10
    Originally posted by ram1977
    g7, followed by Bh7
    That's a fair start. But now try to look for ideas for Black, and try to refute your initial ideas... and then possibly look for further counters to Black's ideas and so forth. There's a bit more fighting to be done in this position.
  6. 08 Sep '08 20:21
    Originally posted by Varenka
    That's a fair start. But now try to look for ideas for Black, and try to refute your initial ideas... and then possibly look for further counters to Black's ideas and so forth. There's a bit more fighting to be done in this position.
    You're right. White has to worry about 1.g7 Be5 2.g8=Q Re1+. I'll have to look at this some more.
  7. 08 Sep '08 20:44 / 7 edits
    1. g7 Re1+ 2. Bd1! Re8 3. Bh5 Rg8 4. Bf7 Rxg7 5. g6! =

    Overview:

    Opposite colored bishop. Two passed pawns that have crossed into enemy territory vs. rook. Another side note: white's bishop prevents the black king from imposing opposition, and the location of black's bishop illustrates how the location of a piece can obstruct the free passage of his own pieces. Black's king is also on the same color square as his bishop -- taking squares away from his bishop restricting his mobility.

    Analysis:

    a) 2. ... Rxd1 3. Kc2 and black can't prevent the pawn from promoting.

    b) 5. g6! traps the rook.

    Epilogue:

    Another example of how a passed pawn in the enemy's camp may be equal to a rook. Many other example illustrate how a pawn can even be stronger than a rook, e.g. Saavedra.
  8. 09 Sep '08 07:34 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    You're right. White has to worry about 1.g7 Be5 2.g8=Q Re1+. I'll have to look at this some more.
    you could block the final rook check with your bishop. that's actually the first point in this position.

    petrovich's line is the correct one. I was referring to the last position of his main line when I said beautiful:
  9. 09 Sep '08 10:12
    Originally posted by diskamyl
    petrovich's line is the correct one. I was referring to the last position of his main line when I said beautiful:
    [fen]8/5Br1/3b2P1/8/1k6/8/8/1K6 b - - 0 5[/fen]
    Yep, as soon as I saw petrovitch's solution, it was clear to me what you'd meant. It _is_ a nice position. Once the rook is trapped, the white king doesn't even have to do anything except make random moves.
  10. 09 Sep '08 18:00 / 3 edits
    originally posted by mad rook
    the white king doesn't even have to do anything except make random moves.
    not quite true -
    would be zugzwang, but white would have to pretty dopey to walk into it ^_^
  11. 09 Sep '08 18:30
    Originally posted by loaf86
    not quite true - [fen]8/5Br1/6P1/5kbK/8/8/8/8 w - - 0 1[/fen] would be zugzwang, but white would have to pretty dopey to walk into it ^_^
    how did he walk into that in the first place?
  12. 09 Sep '08 18:55
    Originally posted by diskamyl
    how did he walk into that in the first place?
    Originally posted by Mad Rook
    Completely random moves