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  1. 06 Jan '13 21:52
    I have a friend who has expressed an interest in learning to play chess beyond the novice level.

    I want to send him a clear, easy to understand chess book for beginners. I own several chess books and frankly it's really hit and miss with how readable the authors can be. I've seen books "for beginners" that were anything but.

    I would like some recommendations. The book needs to be available through Amazon for simplicity's sake.
    I'm thinking that with the holidays recently behind us - some of you may have just purchased books of this type.

    Thanks for your time and help.

    CC
  2. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    06 Jan '13 22:20
    For beginners, I've always liked Winning Chess Strategy for Kids by Jeff Coakley. It's written for children, but it's great for any beginner. I also like Comprehensive Chess Course by Pelts and Alburt. It's 7 volumes total, but the first 2 are great for beginners.
  3. 06 Jan '13 22:33 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by CamelClutch
    I have a friend who has expressed an interest in learning to play chess beyond the novice level.

    I want to send him a clear, easy to understand chess book for beginners. I own several chess books and frankly it's really hit and miss with how readable the authors can be. I've seen books "for beginners" that were anything but.

    I would like some recom of you may have just purchased books of this type.

    Thanks for your time and help.

    CC
    I loved Logical chess move by move, its an old book, but it was excellently written. For
    elementary tactics I found Farnsworths, Predator at the chess board to be excellent. All
    the stuff in the latter is available on-line for free although you can buy the book if you
    like,

    http://www.chesstactics.org/

    regards Robbie.
  4. 06 Jan '13 22:36
    I need to include - the friend is an adult....so I need to steer away from anything with "for kids" in the title. I understand that the book may be great for all ages, etc, etc, but I got to take pride into the equation here.

    Thanks!

    CC
  5. 06 Jan '13 22:55
    The Mammoth Book of Chess. It has everything you need.

    It's thick so a beginner might be off thinking he has to read it all to
    know about the game. But it teaches the basics and much much more.

    Saw a copy on ebay for 99p the other day.
  6. Standard member kingshill
    Mr Ring Rusty
    07 Jan '13 00:38
    'How to beat your dad at chess' is a good book for beginners
  7. Standard member ChessPraxis
    Cowboy From Hell
    07 Jan '13 02:16
    Originally posted by CamelClutch
    I have a friend who has expressed an interest in learning to play chess beyond the novice level.

    I want to send him a clear, easy to understand chess book for beginners. I own several chess books and frankly it's really hit and miss with how readable the authors can be. I've seen books "for beginners" that were anything but.

    I would like some recom ...[text shortened]... of you may have just purchased books of this type.

    Thanks for your time and help.

    CC
    TimmyBX wrote a great book. Contact him. 🙂
  8. 07 Jan '13 02:28
    Originally posted by kingshill
    'How to beat your dad at chess' is a good book for beginners
    I like the prequel to that book "How to get your drunk dad to spend time with you" ...seems like they should bundle it in a pack. 😉


    In all seriousness though the best rec I can give is "Tips for young players" by M. Sadler. The only thing poor about this book is the name, as there are 0 "tips" but instead builds a foundation. Also young means new, it's an adult book.
  9. Subscriber AttilaTheHorn
    Erro Ergo Sum
    07 Jan '13 02:40 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by CamelClutch
    I need to include - the friend is an adult....so I need to steer away from anything with "for kids" in the title. I understand that the book may be great for all ages, etc, etc, but I got to take pride into the equation here.

    Thanks!

    CC
    I've used the book, "Winning Chess Strategy for Kids," with adults very successfully. Although it's aimed at children, it is very useful for adults too because it doesn't over-complicate concepts and explains them in easy-to-understand language. I learned from it myself as an adult after returning to chess after a 30 year absence and it was eye-opening for me. I don't hesitate to recommend it for both children and adults because I'd say it's for anyone under a 1300 rating. Because it's aimed at kids, many ideas are presented that are very easy to pick up. As a result, adults latch onto it quickly. I've found that when an adult shies away from this book because of the word, "Kids," in the title, the kids who take to the book quickly make mincemeat out of that adult in their games. So I recommend that adults learning the game embrace this book, or else the kids who've studied it will beat him.
  10. Donation ketchuplover
    G.O.A.T.
    07 Jan '13 11:01
    How about "Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess" ?
  11. 07 Jan '13 11:13
    Not sure if Greenpawn was referring to this book Mammoth Book Of Chess by Graham Burgess but it has helped me loads, could'nt beat any of my friends for ages and now have a ok ish rating!
  12. 07 Jan '13 15:01
    Better chess for average players - Tim Harding

    Very good,cheap,used copies very cheap.
  13. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    07 Jan '13 17:38
    Originally posted by CamelClutch
    I have a friend who has expressed an interest in learning to play chess beyond the novice level.

    I want to send him a clear, easy to understand chess book for beginners. I own several chess books and frankly it's really hit and miss with how readable the authors can be. I've seen books "for beginners" that were anything but.

    I would like some recom ...[text shortened]... of you may have just purchased books of this type.

    Thanks for your time and help.

    CC
    My first chess book was "Chess Self-Teacher" by Al Horowitz. It is an old book from 1961 so it may not be available now. It has eight lessons with quizzes and reviews and I thought it taught me the basics very well. Of course this is just a first step book, but easy to understand. The drawback is that it is in descriptive notation unless there has been an updated printing of it.

    It is still available and this link shows the version I have.
    http://www.amazon.com/Chess-Self-Teacher-al-Horowitz/dp/0389002305

    There is a new printing at the following link, but there is no indication as to what chess notation is used.

    http://www.amazon.com/Chess-Self-Teacher-Lessons-Quizzes-Reviews/dp/0060922958
  14. Subscriber moonbusonline
    Uber-Nerd
    08 Jan '13 12:24
    First read and thoroughly digest: "Modern Chess Strategy", Ed. Lasker (not to be confused w/ former world champion Em. Lasker). Don't be put off by the date of publication; it is still the best-organized and most clearly explained reference work for the things that don't change about chess strategy. This is the book which will get duffers over the 1800 barrier. Once you've learned everything this book has to offer, and I do mean everything, then read and thoroughly digest Hans Kmoch's absolutely essential "Pawn Power in Chess", which will add another 200+ points to your rating. These two books alone will get you over the 2000 barrier. Then you can worry about current opening fads.


    http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Chess-Strategy-Edward-Lasker/dp/0679140220/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1357647237&sr=8-1&keywords=edward+lasker


    http://www.amazon.com/Pawn-Power-Chess-Dover/dp/0486264866/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1357647564&sr=1-1&keywords=hans+kmoch
  15. 08 Jan '13 12:26
    So in your book an 1800 duffer is a beginner.Hmm.....