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  1. Standard member sydsad
    Poet
    13 Apr '07 08:22
    What are your favourite Chess Training Exercises? I just found out about the "Stoyko Exercise" which sounds doable and interesting.

    What else?
  2. 13 Apr '07 08:30
    Mr. Stoyko claims that he gained 100 points after every Stoyko exercise. how realistic.
  3. Standard member UmbrageOfSnow
    All Bark, No Bite
    13 Apr '07 09:00
    Originally posted by sydsad
    What are your favourite Chess Training Exercises? I just found out about the "Stoyko Exercise" which sounds doable and interesting.

    What else?
    I like Silman's exercise of playing through GM games with trying to guess one player's move each time, and then seeing if you were right, trying to figure out why, and then making the response and repeating.
  4. 13 Apr '07 10:42
    Originally posted by UmbrageOfSnow
    I like Silman's exercise of playing through GM games with trying to guess one player's move each time, and then seeing if you were right, trying to figure out why, and then making the response and repeating.
    Thats not Silman's idea...its how many people have been learning for a long time...a lot of these new books and 'new' training methods are just old methods reworded in a way to make you think you are on to something new that will make you a master..all just a way for the author to get you to buy his books
  5. Standard member onyx2006
    onyx2007
    13 Apr '07 10:53
    Silman does recommend playing through master games & guessing moves, and it 'is' a good thing, and 'does' help improve your chess.
  6. 13 Apr '07 11:15
    Originally posted by onyx2006
    Silman does recommend playing through master games & guessing moves, and it 'is' a good thing, and 'does' help improve your chess.
    I didn't say it wouldn't help...the fact of the matter there is enough chess books out there that there isn't a need for anymore along the lines of chess training...yet people keep writing them and doing their best to make you think its some new secret of chess revealed...when in fact all they are doing is taking old methods and using them to make money...Silman isnt doing anything that original in his books but yet people gobble them down because they think they are learning something new...its just people falling for his marketing
  7. 13 Apr '07 11:23
    Originally posted by Patzergrl
    I didn't say it wouldn't help...the fact of the matter there is enough chess books out there that there isn't a need for anymore along the lines of chess training...yet people keep writing them and doing their best to make you think its some new secret of chess revealed...when in fact all they are doing is taking old methods and using them to make money... ...[text shortened]... ecause they think they are learning something new...its just people falling for his marketing
    Thats an interesting rant. However the reason Silman's books are good is because they explain things clearly and in a manner that makes it interesting to read. In short, he is a good writer while many other "chess authors" have great understanding but lack the skills to communicate that understanding.
  8. Standard member wormwood
    If Theres Hell Below
    13 Apr '07 11:41
    Originally posted by zebano
    Thats an interesting rant. However the reason Silman's books are good is because they explain things clearly and in a manner that makes it interesting to read. In short, he is a good writer while many other "chess authors" have great understanding but lack the skills to communicate that understanding.
    anyone who's ever studied in a university knows exactly what that means. usually even the most brilliant scholars are just completely useless at teaching. good teachers are few and far between.
  9. 13 Apr '07 11:53
    Originally posted by Patzergrl
    Thats not Silman's idea...its how many people have been learning for a long time...a lot of these new books and 'new' training methods are just old methods reworded in a way to make you think you are on to something new that will make you a master..all just a way for the author to get you to buy his books
    And there's nothing really wrong with what Mr. Silman did, as long as he created something of value in the book and didn't claim that the study of master games was an original idea.
  10. 13 Apr '07 14:40
    Originally posted by sydsad
    What are your favourite Chess Training Exercises? I just found out about the "Stoyko Exercise" which sounds doable and interesting.

    What else?
    If I understand the Stoyko exercise, you choose a middlegame position from a GM game and write down everything about it. You also evaluate all potential lines. The point being to then compare your evaluations with those of a master. Will fritz suffice, or does the computer evaluate things to differently than a human does?
  11. Standard member sydsad
    Poet
    13 Apr '07 15:03
    Oh, I think a computer would be usefull for most "improvers". The Silicon Helper would probably help you to detect blunders in your analysis.
  12. 13 Apr '07 15:32
    I have mixed and matched a few different ideas. I will take one annotated game and play through it for a week. Reading and rereading all notes. The idea of taking a masters game and trying to figure out the next move is another one I will do with annotated games. MDLM is also a good approach, with "Knight Moves" and concentric square exercises. Obviously playing is a great way to practice, players at, above, and below your level. I have been lucky to play against better players who will turn around and offer a "non-rated" return match with advice every step of the way. If there is a Chess Club in your area you can go there too. Try reading Dan Heisman's Novice Nook column.
  13. 13 Apr '07 17:50
    try these 3 articles and go from there

    http://www.chesscafe.com/text/heisman32.pdf

    http://www.chesscafe.com/text/skittles148.pdf

    http://www.chesscafe.com/text/skittles150.pdf