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  1. Standard member Bowmann
    Non-Subscriber
    01 Dec '05 00:04


    White has just played the natural developing move, 9...Bd3?

    How can Black exploit this oversight?
  2. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    01 Dec '05 00:16 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by Bowmann
    [fen]r1b1k2r/pp3ppp/4pn2/q1pp4/1bPP4/1QNBPN2/PP3PPP/R3K2R[/fen]

    White has just played the natural developing move, 9...Bd3?

    How can Black exploit this oversight?
    ..dxc4
    Bxc4 ..b5
    Bxb5? Qxb5

    Or....

    ..dxc4
    Bxc4 ..b5
    B(any..) Nd5 winning material

    EDIT: Actually, black could also start a pawn storm on the Queenside...

    ..dxc4
    Bxc4 ..b5
    Be2 (or else ..c4) ..c4
    Qc2 ..Nd5 etc..
  3. Standard member XanthosNZ
    Cancerous Bus Crash
    01 Dec '05 00:27
    Originally posted by marinakatomb
    ..dxc4
    Bxc4 ..b5
    Bxb5? Qxb5

    Or....

    ..dxc4
    Bxc4 ..b5
    B(any..) Nd5 winning material

    EDIT: Actually, black could also start a pawn storm on the Queenside...

    ..dxc4
    Bxc4 ..b5
    Be2 (or else ..c4) ..c4
    Qc2 ..Nd5 etc..
    No need to mess about.

    1. ... b5!

    This threatens both bxc4 and dxc4 winning the bishop to the fork. If cxb(d)5 then c4 and the fork.
  4. Subscriber Marinkatomb
    wotagr8game
    01 Dec '05 00:41
    Originally posted by XanthosNZ
    No need to mess about.

    1. ... b5!

    This threatens both bxc4 and dxc4 winning the bishop to the fork. If cxb(d)5 then c4 and the fork.
    Ah yes, of course!! Nice
  5. Standard member Bowmann
    Non-Subscriber
    04 Dec '05 15:14 / 2 edits
    Black replies with 9...b5!

    10. cxb5 c4, winning a piece.

    This is an effective blend of pin and fork that comes up quite often.


    [Correction: 9...Bd3? in my first post should of course read 9. Bd3?]
  6. 05 Dec '05 10:49 / 3 edits
    Originally posted by XanthosNZ
    No need to mess about.

    1. ... b5!

    This threatens both bxc4 and dxc4 winning the bishop to the fork. If cxb(d)5 then c4 and the fork.
    Amazingly (well maybe not as eventually I suppose you will find yourself in these positions) but 2 days ago on gameknot I was black in this very position! I actually missed b5 but did play pxp. I did a double take when I saw Bowmans position as I recognized it immediately.

    Edit: Actually it is slighly different as he has a bishop on g5 and I have a knight on d2, but they do not effect the validity of the said moves. The game is in progress so obviously I cannot discuss it (and do not seek advice). Maybe I should not have mentioned it but was so astounded to see my position (well almost).
  7. Standard member Bowmann
    Non-Subscriber
    05 Dec '05 15:42
    Originally posted by stevetodd
    Maybe I should not have mentioned it but was so astounded to see my position (well almost).
    Glad you did. This is exactly the point of my examples. These aren't so much compositions, or puzzles, as illustrations of more typical board patterns and situations that players will encounter. They are, however, aimed at "weaker" players.

    Good luck in the game.
  8. 05 Dec '05 16:37
    How did the opening move sequence go leading up to this position ? This could even be more beneficial to weaker players to see where exactly they went oops
  9. Standard member gaurav2711
    walking...
    05 Dec '05 17:00 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by XanthosNZ
    No need to mess about.

    1. ... b5!

    This threatens both bxc4 and dxc4 winning the bishop to the fork. If cxb(d)5 then c4 and the fork.
    good one!!
  10. Standard member Weadley
    NONE
    05 Dec '05 17:03 / 1 edit
    If black plays b5 doesnt the bishop just move back (and waste a move)?
    And loses a pawn only?
  11. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    05 Dec '05 17:24
    Originally posted by Weadley
    If black plays b5 doesnt the bishop just move back (and waste a move)?
    And loses a pawn only?
    Losing a pawn for nothing equals a failed opening effort and probably a lost game.
  12. Standard member Bowmann
    Non-Subscriber
    05 Dec '05 17:53
    Originally posted by Oddjob291
    How did the opening move sequence go leading up to this position ?
    I don't have the moves. But the game was played in London 1937, between Golombek and Wheatcroft.
  13. Standard member Weadley
    NONE
    05 Dec '05 18:53
    Bowmann,, bid dog,,,
    So... white doesnt "have" to lose a bishop correct...
    Just a pawn?
  14. Standard member Weadley
    NONE
    07 Dec '05 18:06
    Im still curios.
  15. Standard member XanthosNZ
    Cancerous Bus Crash
    07 Dec '05 20:35 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by Weadley
    Bowmann,, bid dog,,,
    So... white doesnt "have" to lose a bishop correct...
    Just a pawn?
    This was answered. Yes, white goes down a single pawn with no compensation (actually negative compensation). Black has a large advantage and should win the game unless he blunders.