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  1. 24 Jan '13 19:48
    Hello fellow RHP players.

    I would like to play the classical caro-kann (1: e4 c6 2: d4 d5 3: Nc3 dxe4 4: Nxe4) as white, so i'm looking for a book giving the key ideas against 4: .. Bf5, 4: .. Nd7 and 4: .. Nf6.
    Openings according to Anand is to heavy analysis.
    The only other up-to-date book is DW Caro-Kann, which doesn't have anything against 4: .. Nf6. It has 6: N1e2 against Bf5 variation, and main line against Nd7.
  2. Subscriber rookorbycrook
    rookorbycrook
    24 Jan '13 21:47
    well u tried the chess website .com very useful covers mainly the mainline on opening.. ie after bf5 ng3 bg6...... nf3 and now maybe nd7 or e6 after white play h4 black to protect bishop play h6 then h5 bh7 bd3 ( then exchange off bishops ) then play e6 get ya dark squared bishop activated then look at maybe qc6 castle king side etc but thats the main line of the caro kann hope this helps 🙂
  3. 25 Jan '13 17:29
    I know the main lines, but the ideas i need. Why does white play h4-h5 before playing Bd3? When and why does he play Rh4 instead of Rhe1 and so on.
  4. Subscriber rookorbycrook
    rookorbycrook
    25 Jan '13 17:51
    1. Why h4? The claimed goals of that move are to threaten to trap the black bishop and to strenghten the king side. However, I do not see any serious threat on the bishop and I thought that advancing a pawn on the castle side (since the variation often continues with a castle on the king's side) was a weakening rather than strengthening move. Why isn't a developping move like Nf3 considered a better alternate?
    2. Why h6? What is so immediately threatening the bishop that would cause black to reply with h6, which in my mind has the same drawback as h4?
  5. Subscriber rookorbycrook
    rookorbycrook
    25 Jan '13 17:52
    from here i just googled it to get some ideas ....http://www.chess.com/forum/view/chess-openings/why-h4-h6-in-caro-kann
  6. 26 Jan '13 16:47
    More often than not I think h5 becomes a weaknesses in the endgame.
  7. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    27 Jan '13 03:45 / 10 edits
    This may or may not be of interest to you, but this is about all i can contibute on the Caro-Kann Defense.

    I have played on both sides of the caro-Kann Defense, but the following game is the only OTB tournament game that I have played against it. It was played in round two of the 1600 and under rating section of the 1982 World Open. This young lady, Betsy Content Smith, came with her coach to play some serious chess and win some money. I quit playing OTB chess after this tournament but she went on to play until 1987 and obtain a USCF rating of 2068.

  8. 27 Jan '13 04:04
    "Caro Kann defense. White sometimes likes to transpose into the Advanced French defense by playing 3.e5 here, so you need to study this variation of the French."

    White playing e5 is NOT the advanced variation of the French - where did you ever get that idea!
  9. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    27 Jan '13 04:12 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by kbear1k
    "Caro Kann defense. White sometimes likes to transpose into the Advanced French defense by playing 3.e5 here, so you need to study this variation of the French."

    White playing e5 is NOT the advanced variation of the French - where did you ever get that idea!
    Maybe I am wrong, but after black plays e6 it looks like tha advanced variation of the French defense to me. I guess it is the advanced variation of the Caro-kann then.
  10. 27 Jan '13 04:17
    When black playing the black side of a French versus the advanced black should play c5 instead of c6 - c6 is a wasted move.
  11. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    27 Jan '13 04:19 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by kbear1k
    When black playing the black side of a French versus the advanced black should play c5 instead of c6 - c6 is a wasted move.
    Okay, my mistake. Thanks.

    P.S. I corrected my notes, okay?
  12. 27 Jan '13 06:59
    I give wicked Go lessons at cheap prices. They're for beginners only. (Anyone else would realize that I don't actually know how to play Go.) 😉
  13. Subscriber rookorbycrook
    rookorbycrook
    27 Jan '13 09:55 / 1 edit
    black plays nf6 resulting in doubled pawns ? not sure about that mate... after nxe4 bf5 looks plausible
  14. Subscriber rookorbycrook
    rookorbycrook
    27 Jan '13 09:59
    yes obv c5 in the french... but yes he is right it does transpose into the french defence and for example if you study your openings they all blend together if you play certain moves and play them around...
  15. Standard member RJHinds
    The Near Genius
    27 Jan '13 19:30 / 2 edits
    Originally posted by rookorbycrook
    black plays nf6 resulting in doubled pawns ? not sure about that mate... after nxe4 bf5 looks plausible
    Yes, 4...Bf5 is the classical line. However, her coach may have wanted to get out of those lines that players at our level had memorized and knew the best moves as far as this:


    I think the best followup for the alternate line that she played after 5.Nxf6 is 5...exf6 instead of 5...gxf6, because the bishop is free to move and the kingside pawns are still strong. However, her coach may have prepared something else that we will never know. Possibly an attack on the open knight file. Anyway, since I did not play perfectly either she got a winning advantage, but did not have the experience at that time to finish the job.