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  1. 13 Jun '08 21:04
    greenpawn34, if you have some time in the future would you please analyze my weak points again. I procrastinated in putting this up because I was a little ashamed of some of my mid-later moves but I'm over my shame now.


    Game 5052670
  2. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    13 Jun '08 23:29
    Originally posted by CEE DOG
    greenpawn34, if you have some time in the future would you please analyze my weak points again. I procrastinated in putting this up because I was a little ashamed of some of my mid-later moves but I'm over my shame now.


    Game 5052670
    I'm not crazy about the whole Bb5xc6 idea. You doubled Black's pawns, but also gave him more central control.

    I thought Black rushed 7...d4. I'd prefer to leave the P on d5 and develop instead. 7...Bg4, ...e6, and ...Be7 comes to mind.

    I'm not sure about 8...dxc3. At first, it doesn't look right. Black is leaving himself with doubled, isolated c-pawns and giving up central control. Then again, he gets the open g-file and two Bishops. Still, I'd prefer 8...Nd5.

    You had a tough choice on move 11. The upcoming pin is annoying, but you ended up helping Black fix his pawns by playing 11.Qe2 and 12.c4 and 13.cd5. Maybe 11.Qd3 to avoid the pin and avoid undoubling Black's pawns.

    15...Bg7? should have been 15...e6, which secures the pawns. Instead, Black played for a cheap shot on the Ra1, and just ended up losing a pawn when you didn't fall for it. Further clumsiness lost Black a 2nd pawn.

    White seems to be winning in the ensuing ending - up 2 P with a better pawn structure.
  3. 13 Jun '08 23:56
    good game i used and oppeing boook to beat you guys through mve 15.... by the way dont double your pawns like swiss gam bit saId...
  4. 14 Jun '08 11:25
    I'll look at it later on today - SG looks like he has made
    some good worthwhile comments - dont think I'll be able
    to improve on that. I'll most likely repeat. WTS.
  5. 14 Jun '08 13:34 / 1 edit
    Thank you Swiss!
    Move 11: I seriously considered Q-d3 and probably you're right. I was trying to keep the option open to bring Bishop from C1 to H6 and then checkmate with Queen on E7. I'm positive the way he plays he would have exchanged and I would have neded up with un-doubling my pawns.
    I'm not positive move 15-e6 is the move for him but I'll take your word for it since I am just a grasshopper. Any comments on the correct way to move forward with my pawn advantage? I felt like I struggled a lot more then I should have at that point. Maybe it was just my fear of making a wrong move.
  6. Standard member SwissGambit
    Caninus Interruptus
    14 Jun '08 19:17
    Originally posted by CEE DOG
    Thank you Swiss!
    Move 11: I seriously considered Q-d3 and probably you're right. I was trying to keep the option open to bring Bishop from C1 to H6 and then checkmate with Queen on E7. I'm positive the way he plays he would have exchanged and I would have neded up with un-doubling my pawns.
    I'm not positive move 15-e6 is the move for him but I'll take ...[text shortened]... ot more then I should have at that point. Maybe it was just my fear of making a wrong move.
    The Bh6 plan takes too long, and is easily defended by ...e6. Notice how you never got the chance to implement it, since your opponent grabbed your attention by pinning your Knight. This brings up two good rules of thumb:

    1) Expect your opponent to see your threats. Make sure your planned move is good even if he defends the threat.
    2) Compare your plan to your opponent's plan and see who is faster. If his plan is faster, that may be the cue to defend for a bit.

    I criticized 15...Bg7 mainly because Black's idea seemed to be a cheap discovered attack on your Rook. 15...e6 may not be the only good move for Black, but it shows that he has his priorities straight - he needs to secure the pawns, rather than make cheap threats [like 16...f5] that are easily evaded.

    As for winning the endgame, maybe 31.b4 is a bit faster. The idea is to get two connected passed pawns ASAP. Black would not live long once those guys got going.
  7. 14 Jun '08 21:00 / 2 edits
    Hi. I don’t mind doing this – I enjoy it.
    Two things.

    1) At the moment I have some time to do it. (and want to do it).
    2) I do not pull punches. If I slam a player for making a bad move
    and he gets upset. Good, because his bad move has upset me.

    CEE DOG - AttilaTheHorn

    1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5

    I started playing this about 20 years ago because I was fed playing
    against The Najdorf, The Dragon, and all the other branches of the Sicilian.

    I now very rarely play an open Sicilian. 3.d4 is just what a Sicilian player
    wants. It’s what he has booked up for.

    Giving up a center pawn for a wing pawn is anti-positional.
    I think it was Larsen who said that about 3.d4.

    3…Nf6

    3...e6 with idea of Nge7 is a very popular plan. I lost an allegro once
    against 3...Na5."You cannot do that to me!" and went sac happy.
    It is a variation that has been played by GM's. I never knew that
    So I eventually a bought book on the Bb5 variation.

    4.Nc3

    You will never hear me arguing against a developing move.
    I play 4.Qe2 or 4.e5 here depending on who I am playing.

    4...a6?!

    I like to see this as White. It's a waste of a tempo.
    Usually White plays Bxc6 in all the main lines.

    5.Bxc6 bxc6

    It's common to see dxc6 recaptures in this opening.
    It seems to depend on who is playing who. Kramnik plays dxc6
    whilst Salov plays bxc6. Different ideas, different plans.
    I'm a dxc6 guy. (piece activity). bxc6 (centre building is OK).

    6.0–0 d5 7.Re1?!

    7.e5 was the move 7.e5 Ng4 8.h3 Nh6 9.d4 and Black can very
    easily slip into a bad position from here.
    7.Re1 is a lazy move. The game is sliding towards Black.


    7...d4 8.e5

    Such pawn shoves have to be looked at carefully.
    Usually in these tit-for-tat exchanges the 2nd player comes off worse,
    but your superior development should protect you against any
    sudden surprises.

    However. I would have gone Nb1-d3-Nd2-Nc4
    (a nice stable for a Knight is c4 in this position).
    and pick the game up from there.

    8...dxc3 9.exf6 gxf6

    An instructive moment here if 9...cxd2 then 10.Nxd2!
    an idea I've seen in a Four Knights game. Vacating f3 for the Queen
    .9...cxd2 10.Nxd2 gxf6 11.Qf3 - (then N-b3or c4 or e4).
    If you take anything from this then remember that backward capture idea.

    10.dxc3

    10.Qe2 was better. Black should now swap Queens
    and play Bf5 he is not worse here.

    10...Qd5?! 11.Qe2 Bg4 12.c4?

    This idea losses a pawn. 12.Bf4 get a piece out

    12...Bxf3 13.cxd5?!

    You have sorted out his pawns - I hope he sent a
    'Thank You' message. 13.gxf3 was better.

    13...Bxe2 14.Rxe2 cxd5



    Let's stop and have a look. Black is pawn up and should be able to untangle
    his bits and have a nice headache free game.

    He can only lose this. White has no weaknesses but will have to wait to see
    what Black's winning plan is so he can counter it.
    He can sniff at a couple of loose pawns but Black should be able to handle that.

    I would not be too confident about holding this against a good player.
    I would then talk myself into thinking the position is tenable,

    [1]“It’s not too bad. I can sac my Bishop for his centre pawns. Swap some pawns,
    swap Rooks and leave him with h-pawn and wrong Bishop.”[/i]

    And with Plan A in mind I would centralise everything and wait.

    I’ve had worse, much worse and won.
    There again I’ve had better, much better and lost.

    15.b3 Bg7?

    This guy belongs on e7. SG is correct about e6 here.
    This Bg7 plan is faulty.

    16.Ba3 f5 17.Rd1 Bd4 18.Rd3?!

    18.c3 Bxc3 19.Bxc5 e6 20.Rxd5 And White is turning it around.

    18...0–0? 19.c3?

    19.Rxe7 and White must be on top. Black has loose pawns all over the place.

    19...Bf6 20.Bxc5 Rfe8 21.Rxd5

    Terrible play by Black.
    It has taken him 6 moves to turn a comfortable game into a loss.

    21...e6 22.Rd3 Red8 23.Red2 Kg7 24.Bb6

    Anything White plays now should stumble to a win.
    I've been mated and have mated too many times on the back rank.
    I would have played Kf1 here.

    24...Rdb8 25.Bd4 Bxd4 26.Rxd4 a5 27.Ra4 Rc8 28.Rd3 Rd8
    29.Rxd8 Rxd8 30.Kf1 Rd5 31.Rc4?!


    Why?

    31...Rd2 32.Ra4 Rd5 33.Ke2 Kf6 34.c4 Rd4 35.Rxa5 Re4+


    It's over - resigns was an idea.

    36.Kf1 Rd4 37.a4 Rd3 38.Rb5 Rd2 39.a5 Ra2 1–0


    White cruised into a very difficult position by making
    some first come first served moves. 7.Re1 and 12.c4 were
    the dodgy moves.

    Black’s shocking moves 15-20 turned the game into a loss.

    White then enjoyed his second chance and sailed home
    without any trouble.
  8. 14 Jun '08 22:23 / 4 edits
    Thanks for analysis Greenpawn, I very much appreciate it and as before it seems to be right on except for 1 comment I was shocked about. I had a couple comments and please forgive me my ignorance but I would prefer to look ignorant and learn then continue being ignorant... I placed quotes from your article in ((((( )))))

    See below

    5.Bxc6 bxc6 - I was very happy to see this. He would have opened Queen and Bishops attack by going dxc6


    (((((7.e5 was the move 7.e5 Ng4 8.h3 Nh6 9.d4 and Black can very
    easily slip into a bad position from here.
    7.Re1 is a lazy move. The game is sliding towards Black. )))))

    If I had gone 7.e5 here then doesn't it go 7.e5 Ne4 8. Nxe4 dxe4? If he moves his Knight where you said isn't it weakening my kings defense to move my pawn? Here I was thinking I would develop my rook to the soon to open rank and would have his pawn pinned to king if he passed my pawn allowing me to attack his Knight Is this bad thinking?


    ((((("7...d4 8.e5

    Such pawn shoves have to be looked at carefully.
    Usually in these tit-for-tat exchanges the 2nd player comes off worse,
    but your superior development should protect you against any
    sudden surprises.

    However. I would have gone Nb1-d3-Nd2-Nc4
    (a nice stable for a Knight is c4 in this position).
    and pick the game up from there.)))))

    This comment of yours surprised me big time! Wouldn't this take some time to get to this and shouldn't I be developing pieces instead?
  9. 14 Jun '08 22:40 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by CEE DOG
    Thanks for analysis Greenpawn, I very much appreciate it and as before it seems to be right on except for 1 comment I was shocked about. I had a couple comments and please forgive me my ignorance but I would prefer to look ignorant and learn then continue being ignorant... I placed quotes from your article in ((((( )))))

    See below

    5.Bxc6 bxc ! Wouldn't this take some time to get to this and shouldn't I be developing pieces instead?
    CEE DOG - AttilaTheHorn

    hi, I have a book by neil mcdonald on the subject, entitled, the Bb5 Sicilian revealed and if i may be as so bold, will offer up some alternative suggestions simply for the opening as he recommends,

    1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5

    rossiliomo variation

    3…Nf6

    Neil says,' this is a comparitively unusual idea but has some high powered champions. as far as pawn structure goes, black keeps all his options open. for example upon, 4. Bxc6 dxc6 he can aim to put his kings bishop on d6 where it will be more active than on g7 after e7-e5. while after 4. e5 Nd5 the position is imbalanced which should suit an ambitious player as black even though it isn't necessarily good for him!

    Another idea for white involving the e4-e5 pawn push which greenpawn mentions, depending upon who he is playing , has been tried by grandmaster hector, 3..d6 4.e5!?

    Neil says,' This has barely been investigated and black got into hot water against a much lower rated opponent after 4.e5 Bg4, 5.h3 Bh5, 6.g4 Bg6, 7.Qe2 e6, 8.Bxc6+ bxc6, 9.d3 h5, 10.exd6 Bxd6, 11.Rg1 hxg4, 12.hxg4 Ne7 1.a3! where black had no where safe to castle, the c5 pawn is weak and the bishop pair are passive, what more could you ask for as white, regards Robbie.
  10. 14 Jun '08 23:05
    Good - question everything do not take anything on spec.

    "If I had gone 7.e5 here then doesn't it go 7.e5 Ne4 8. Nxe4 dxe4? "

    7.e5 Ne4? 8.Ne2 and the Knight has no retreat.
    I stopped looking there - it's the kind of bad position that
    Black can drift into. 8...h6 9.d3 wins a pawn.

    Black has an open h-file - but no development.
    Where is Black going to 0-0.

    (However. I would have gone Nb1-d3-Nd2-Nc4 )

    Black is not set up to take advantage of white's
    time wasting - it's a good plan I think (I'm quite willing
    to be proved wrong) but you now know my next handful
    of moves - do something to prevent it or obtain
    a lasting adavantage. (if Bg4 then h3 )

    Don't be too rule of thumb of redeploying pieces.
    In that postion the square c4 is screaming for a Knight.

    I dislike e4-e5 shoves unless I can see a solid plus.
    Once on e5 the pawn is then a responsibility.
    Chess is all about avoiding responsibilities. The more
    you have the more worries you have.

    So my dislike of e5 was also a personal trait.

    But yes. You are right to Question it and another player
    may come on and disagree -
    I'm open minded enough to be turned.

    I won't sulk - we are all on a learning curve.

    I think I nailed the game - perhaps a bit harsh on Re1.
    I play this stuff (it's an English in reverse).
  11. 14 Jun '08 23:20
    After 3...Nf6 I go 4.Qe2 or 4.e5 (4.Nc3 is move so is 4.Bxc6).
    I said depends who I'm playing. I think 4.Qe2 is sounder.
    4.e5 against less experinced players. (the quick kill).

    e5 usually comes anyway after Qe2.

    Hector is a brilliant player - gifted - has the OTB nerve to play
    slightly unsound chess just to get interesting positions for his
    fertile mind. Lovely to see, very hard to copy.

    I have the Pedersen book on Bb5. and a Batsford thing
    called the anti-sicilian.

    That's an idea - one day write a book on how to beat computers
    called the Anti - Silicon. (no...OK).
  12. 15 Jun '08 08:45
    Originally posted by greenpawn34
    After 3...Nf6 I go 4.Qe2 or 4.e5 (4.Nc3 is move so is 4.Bxc6).
    I said depends who I'm playing. I think 4.Qe2 is sounder.
    4.e5 against less experinced players. (the quick kill).

    e5 usually comes anyway after Qe2.

    Hector is a brilliant player - gifted - has the OTB nerve to play
    slightly unsound chess just to get interesting positions for his
    fer ...[text shortened]... an idea - one day write a book on how to beat computers
    called the Anti - Silicon. (no...OK).
    wow green pawn dude, I read an article once, i think it was on Glasgow student chess site, someone had posted an article on how to beat the silicon beast, the strategy was fairly simple pawns on c3,d4,e3, bishop on d3 and sac, sac sac on g7 and h7, it seemed to work for those guys, but not for me, anyhow, if anyone has any suggestions on how to beat the silicon beast i for one would be most grateful, having just managed once to beat my linux program on super noob mega easy mode!
  13. 15 Jun '08 09:28 / 1 edit
    30.Rd4 looks like a more straightforward way to win to me.
    I would definately have resigned then (if not before) as Black because he has absolutely no counterplay.

    I thought you played the opening pretty well, but then again I know zilch about Sicilian theory!