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  1. 23 Jan '11 07:26
    Are they allowed to be used? I've never used one but was looking at learning options and came across this:

    http://www.shredderchess.com/online-chess/online-databases/opening-database.html

    However I'm not keen as it looks like a way to cheat.

    Opinions please...
  2. 23 Jan '11 07:30
    Originally posted by divegeester
    Are they allowed to be used? I've never used one but was looking at learning options and came across this:

    http://www.shredderchess.com/online-chess/online-databases/opening-database.html

    However I'm not keen as it looks like a way to cheat.

    Opinions please...
    I think they are allowed but its a bit like following a map, it leads you into the forest but once you are there, your not quite sure how to find the way out. Better it is to play something you understand me thinks.
  3. 23 Jan '11 10:23
    Originally posted by divegeester

    However I'm not keen as it looks like a way to cheat.

    Opinions please...
    Pff. This thing is pretty pathetic.

    1.f4 g5

    The database has ONE game. One.

    Worse:

    1.f4 e5
    2. d3

    Has two games, one win and one draw.

    In fact there is not a lot of 1. f4 games. How disappointing.
  4. 23 Jan '11 12:05
    Originally posted by Tiwaking
    Pff. This thing is pretty pathetic.

    1.f4 g5

    The database has ONE game. One.

    Worse:

    1.f4 e5
    2. d3

    Has two games, one win and one draw.

    In fact there is not a lot of 1. f4 games. How disappointing.
    Would like to share how you have developed your game?
  5. 23 Jan '11 12:30
    Originally posted by divegeester
    Are they allowed to be used? I've never used one but was looking at learning options and came across this:

    http://www.shredderchess.com/online-chess/online-databases/opening-database.html

    However I'm not keen as it looks like a way to cheat.

    Opinions please...
    Opening databases like the one you linked to are ok to use, but not compulsory. If you don't like them, don't use them.

    However, endgame databases are not allowed. The difference between the two is that opening databases involve games between people, whereas endgame table bases involve computer-generated positions traced back from checkmate or draw, and will give you the optimal move 100% of the time. It would be cheating to use this during a game, but as a learning tool or to see where you went wrong afterwards they can be useful.
  6. 23 Jan '11 16:30
    Originally posted by aquatabby
    Opening databases like the one you linked to are ok to use, but not compulsory. If you don't like them, don't use them.

    However, endgame databases are not allowed. The difference between the two is that opening databases involve games between people, whereas endgame table bases involve computer-generated positions traced back from checkmate or draw, and ...[text shortened]... g a game, but as a learning tool or to see where you went wrong afterwards they can be useful.
    I see, thanks.
  7. 23 Jan '11 20:08
    Besides helping to avoid opening traps, they're really not going to give you any killer edge. The difference is that opening theory is (notwithstanding the ongoing updates) is, for all intents and purposes, established. It's a bit like choosing where to stand in a shooting competition. So all you're "stealing" is the memory of established lines. I think this is where 960 chess stems from. Giants of the game like Short (and I think even Fischer) are/were big supporters of 960 chess because it takes away the regimented memory tests of opening theory and focuses far more on skill OTB.
    The danger of opening books is that you'll just follow the most common move like a zombie, not really knowing what you're doing, only to end up in a position you're not going to understand.
    My advice is to use the books and look up the openings that come about on wikipedia or youtube. First of all, the information you find will give you great advice about how to play each opening (and what your opponents intentions probably are) and it will be an invaluable tool in learning opening theory for yourself with the minimum of effort.
    But it's not cheating!
    Asking a computer what you should do is cheating... and pathetic.
  8. 23 Jan '11 23:19
    Originally posted by divegeester
    Would like to share how you have developed your game?
    That would be giving away my secrets :p

    I am curious about the 1.f4 lines, but with so few games in this database a person would have to strike a path on their own.

    You know, the way chess SHOULD be played. Or at least the way chess should be experienced before defeat and reality teaches you to tow the line.