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  1. 06 Feb '15 00:31 / 29 edits
    Sundialer Vs. KingOnPoint


  2. 06 Feb '15 00:55
    Why not 15.Qxh6?
  3. 06 Feb '15 01:43
    Everyone,
    I do not really know the Giuocomo Pianissimo opening or how to defend against it. Please look at the game above and read the certain comments on the moves I made. Please leave some of your useful comments on how to defend against Giuoco Piano and Giuocomo Pianissimo.

    For instance, it is a correct move for the black knight to take the white bishop at d5 immediately following white's bishop move? Do you see some errors that Black made? What are the general ideas behind the Giuocomo Pianissimo that were evident in the previous game?

    Please Help
  4. 06 Feb '15 09:00
    I'd better get this in before Greenpawn does...

    23. ... Rxf3 looks crushing - 24. gxf3 Qg5+ and 25. ... Qg2#
  5. 06 Feb '15 13:11
    My thought on the bishop capture– I think it is beneficial as it doubles white's pawns and gives black the bishop pair. After white takes back, you can reroute the knight to e7 where it supports an f5 push.
  6. 06 Feb '15 14:00
    Starting from the beginning - 3. ... Nf6, the Two Knights Defence, is a much, much more aggressive opening for Black. If Black knows their stuff then they are likely to end up with a ferocious attack (at the cost of a pawn) if White goes for 4. Ng5. I'm not talking about the Traxler (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.Ng5 Bc4) but just main line Two Knights with 4. ... d5.
  7. 06 Feb '15 15:29
    Data Fly is correct.



    23...Rxf3 is the move here. Black wins a piece as capturing on f3
    allows a Black mate or a loss of the Queen.

    Looking the at the previous moves it does appear Rxf3 could have been
    sooner before even Nh4.

    It is possible Black saw Rxf3 but quickly rejected it because it open
    the g-file towards his King.

    During the middle game White seemed to be playing random move chess.
    He should have played Qxh6 after Bxh6. He may have created a problem
    or two although he had no valid follow up for the piece sac.

    Instead he jumped from plan to plan and it's hard to figure out what
    he was up to. His Ra3 was played to get in that check on g3 which
    infact was a severe blunder and he resigned the next move.


    3....Bc4 is OK. As Data Fly says, 3...Nf6 hitting the e-pawn can lead to
    some hairy positions but so can 3...Bc5 if White plays an Evans with 4.b4.

    The difference between 3...Bc5 and 3...Nf6 is down to a matter of taste.
    As White if I've played 3.Bc4 I slightly prefer to see 3...Nf6 as I'm booked
    up the eye brows on that. 3....Bc5 I use to player the Evans or the 4.c3 and 5.d4 lines.

    Here is fun game.

    G.Chandler - K.Davidson, Edinburgh 1979

  8. 07 Feb '15 23:51
    Datafly and Greenpawn,

    23... Rxf3 24. gxf3 Qg5+ 25. (Kf1, Kh1, Kh2) Qg2#

    I see that progression now. Perhaps, I had not considered Rxf3, but only Nxf3, or thinking only White's Knight taking h4, or was concerned about White's Rook g1+, or focusing on f2 too much.

  9. 07 Feb '15 23:59 / 2 edits
    After 23. Qe2, 23... Rxf3 24. Qxf3 Nxf3+ 25. gxf3 Qg5+ 26. Kh1 Qf4 27. Rg1+ Kh7 28. c4 Bxf2 29. Rg2 doesn't look bad for Black.

  10. 08 Feb '15 00:55
    Eladar,
    To emphasize White's check mate threat to Black I will make the moves for white and play applicable non-relevant moves for Black starting with move 12. Remember that the check mate will not be forced, but it is a threat that Black needs to fight against.



    Perhaps crude for the example, Black will have an option to defend against White's check mate possibility such as:

  11. 08 Feb '15 01:15
    Everyone,
    If I remember correctly, Greenpawn says to play against an opening to learn the opening. Well, can someone state some ideas behind the Giuoco Piano and Giuocomo Pianissimo opening?

    Also, please tell me if I had any faulty thinking other than 23... Rxf3!
  12. 08 Feb '15 19:21 / 1 edit
    I don't see a black mating pattern against white that would prevent white from taking the h pawn and exposing black's king and gaining a pawn at the same time.

    Why sac the bishop if you are not selling out to attack black's king? That bishop sac just doesn't make sense.
  13. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    09 Feb '15 06:54
    Originally posted by Eladar
    I don't see a black mating pattern against white that would prevent white from taking the h pawn and exposing black's king and gaining a pawn at the same time.

    Why sac the bishop if you are not selling out to attack black's king? That bishop sac just doesn't make sense.
    If I read the colors right, it was his opponent who sac'ed.

    It looks unsound to me; black can simply respond with 15...Nf5 even if white plays 15.Qxh6.
  14. Subscriber BigDoggProblem
    The Advanced Mind
    09 Feb '15 07:02
    Originally posted by KingOnPoint
    Sundialer Vs. KingOnPoint


    [pgn][Event "Challenge"]
    [Site "http://www.redhotpawn.com"]
    [Date "2014.11.15"]
    [EndDate "2015.02.01"]
    [Round "?"]
    [White "Sundialer"]
    [Black "KingOnPoint"]
    [WhiteRating "1396"]
    [BlackRating "1537"]
    [WhiteElo "1396"]
    [BlackElo "1537"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [GameId "10899839"]

    1. e4 e5 2. Ng1f3 Nb8c6 3 ...[text shortened]... of the Black Bishop. } 27... Qh4xg3 {White cannot take Black's Queen...White resigns.} 0-1[/pgn]
    Additional comments:

    After 10.Bd5
    I like ...Nxd5 here

    White gets a Qside majority, but you get a Kside majority, so that's a more than fair trade.


    After 15.Nbd2?
    "Play it safe" ... from what? White just blocked his own Q's line to the h-pawn

    I'd take the d5 pawn here. White doesn't have enough pieces pointed at the Kingside to make you pay for the somewhat open King position. Just ...Kh7 and ...f5 in the near future and you'd be fine.
  15. 10 Feb '15 02:25
    Originally posted by BigDoggProblem
    If I read the colors right, it was his opponent who sac'ed.

    It looks unsound to me; black can simply respond with 15...Nf5 even if white plays 15.Qxh6.
    Exactly my point.

    When your opponent makes a bad sac then naturally you have the advantage. Unless you really screw up, you should win I'd think.