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  1. 24 Aug '08 15:19
    I read sometimes in high level tournaments that a player is playing for a drawn game - right from the first move. Why would he do this?
    Anyway how does one play for a draw? At my level the nearest thing I come to playing for a draw is when I see that I cannot win, I will try to get a stalemate, repeated check or repeated moves position just to wriggle out of losing. Any comments?
  2. Standard member JonathanB of London
    Curb Your Enthusiasm
    24 Aug '08 15:46
    Originally posted by dixondo
    ... how does one play for a draw?
    Three examples of people playing for a draw from the word go ...

    http://streathambrixtonchess.blogspot.com/2007/12/interesting-french-exchange.html

    as for why ... well playing chess is difficult. Agreeing a draw quickly is much less stressful. If you're playing somebody better than you then gaining a half point for the draw leaves you better off than losing and getting 0.
  3. 24 Aug '08 17:24
    Originally posted by dixondo
    I read sometimes in high level tournaments that a player is playing for a drawn game - right from the first move. Why would he do this?
    Anyway how does one play for a draw?
    For example you are leading a tournament 5-0 and in the championship game your opponent is 4-1. It would be nice to have a perfect 6-0, but a draw in the final match will give you the trophy just as well. So you start out with some variation that leads to a lot of early exchanges (especially the Q's) and a symmetrical pawn structure. The idea being to eliminate your opponent's chances of winning by getting material off the board and perhaps leaving only Kings and pawns staring at each other with no real way for either side to break through.
  4. 24 Aug '08 17:37
    I'll try to find the game between mikhail gurevich and Nigel Short from the final round of the Interzonal (1990 I think? Maybe someone can help here?)).

    Gurevich only needed a draw to advance to the Candidates matches for the world title, chose the exchange variation of the French defence, and was ground down mercilessly by Short!

    His position deteriorated bit-by-bit because his mindset was draw-exchange pieces-draw-exchange pieces. Short simply accumulated tiny advantages with each exchange - he needed to win but didn't panic; he just let Gurevich slowly self-destruct!

    Playing for a draw from the word go is incredibly difficult-I never do it even when it's all i need in a tournament. Better just to play your normal game - 2 results suit you, only 1 doesn't, so the odds are in your favour!?
  5. Standard member Nowakowski
    10. O-O
    24 Aug '08 17:54
    Originally posted by dixondo
    I read sometimes in high level tournaments that a player is playing for a drawn game - right from the first move. Why would he do this?
    Anyway how does one play for a draw? At my level the nearest thing I come to playing for a draw is when I see that I cannot win, I will try to get a stalemate, repeated check or repeated moves position just to wriggle out of losing. Any comments?
    read the Riga open 2008...and you'll understand how irritating it is when players force draws from lost positions... Korch is getting pretty ticked
  6. Standard member JonathanB of London
    Curb Your Enthusiasm
    24 Aug '08 19:55 / 1 edit
    Originally posted by streetfighter
    I'll try to find the game between mikhail gurevich and Nigel Short from the final round of the Interzonal (1990 I think? Maybe someone can help here?)).
    Yes it was Manilla 1990. It's still one of my favourite games of all time.

    Here's Gurevich-Short

    http://streathambrixtonchess.blogspot.com/2007/11/jbs-favourite-moves-ii.html

    and for those interested...

    (a) Tal trying for (and just getting) a draw against Korchnoi

    http://streathambrixtonchess.blogspot.com/2008/02/interesting-french-exchange-iii.html

    (b) notorious kiddie fiddler Brian Eley trying for (and not getting) a draw against Uhlmann

    http://streathambrixtonchess.blogspot.com/2008/04/interesting-french-exchange-v.html


    [ it's my aim in life to be the world's expert on the French Exchange ;-) ]
  7. 24 Aug '08 20:56
    Cheers JonB. Would have posted it too except my girlfriend has been on the computer for about 75 hours doing e-bay stuff! (She uses the profits to buy chocolate ice cream for greenpawn-see the riga thread)
  8. 25 Aug '08 00:28
    Originally posted by streetfighter
    Cheers JonB. Would have posted it too except my girlfriend has been on the computer for about 75 hours doing e-bay stuff! (She uses the profits to buy chocolate ice cream for greenpawn-see the riga thread)
    Hi - just back from Bells - a good night. Talking to and drinking
    heavily with an FM about chess and chess books.

    Anyway.
    If you look at the old games from the 1800's players like
    Blackburne and alike often played the exchange French with
    every expectation of winning. The game can suddenly go 'kapow'
    with sacs everywhere.

    It's written in the all the good chess books that one should never sit
    down with a draw in mind. You must earn your draw and that means
    palying for a win.

    Better get some sleep (after some blitz). Have work - no bank holiday for me.
    Chocolate ice cream for breakfast.
  9. 25 Aug '08 13:07 / 3 edits
    I am pretty sure this is the Gurevich-Short game mentioned:
  10. Standard member JonathanB of London
    Curb Your Enthusiasm
    25 Aug '08 17:17
    Originally posted by Deece
    I am pretty sure this is the Gurevich-Short game mentioned:
    Yes - that's it.