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  1. 24 Aug '10 20:06
    I decided to do some endgame practice today (for about the first time ever) and realized that I did not even understand basic triangulation. I'm sure some of you don't either, so here's an exercise for you:

    http://www.chessvideos.tv/endgame-training/basic-king-triangulation-10.php
  2. 24 Aug '10 20:28 / 1 edit
    I reached checkmate in 22 moves. Haven't got the faintest idea what basic king triangulation is, though.

    Edit, I wrote 22 but on second thought I think it was more than that.
  3. Standard member nimzo5
    Ronin
    24 Aug '10 21:11
    That is a really good basic example. Two key ideas, first is to gain the opposition White has to be in the same position but lose a move, then a second time triangulate to push the Black king into only moves out the back.

    Good basic endgame technique doesn't take more than a couple hours and it nets countless half and full points in games.
  4. Subscriber Paul Leggett
    Chess Librarian
    25 Aug '10 22:45
    Originally posted by nimzo5
    That is a really good basic example. Two key ideas, first is to gain the opposition White has to be in the same position but lose a move, then a second time triangulate to push the Black king into only moves out the back.

    Good basic endgame technique doesn't take more than a couple hours and it nets countless half and full points in games.
    Rec'd.
  5. 26 Aug '10 01:29
    I though triangulation was with bishops... Anyways I actually didn't see the point of this, it seemed too easy and I'm sure I didn't actually do triangulation. The opposite king seems to randomly pick his moves.
  6. 26 Aug '10 01:47
    Originally posted by Maxacre42
    I though triangulation was with bishops... Anyways I actually didn't see the point of this, it seemed too easy and I'm sure I didn't actually do triangulation. The opposite king seems to randomly pick his moves.
    The opposite king is controlled by the engine Crafty.

    The point is that in the initial position black holds the opposition (There are an odd number of squares between the two kings and white is to move). Therefore, white must gain the opposition by moving in a triangle shape in order to queen his pawn.

    This is a basic example but it is essential endgame technique nonetheless.
  7. 26 Aug '10 08:32
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    I decided to do some endgame practice today (for about the first time ever) and realized that I did not even understand basic triangulation. I'm sure some of you don't either, so here's an exercise for you:

    http://www.chessvideos.tv/endgame-training/basic-king-triangulation-10.php
    Fine example indeed!

    Do more.Post every interesting one you encounter.We,amateurs,need it.

    toet.
  8. Standard member orion25
    Art is hard
    26 Aug '10 10:04
    Originally posted by toeternitoe
    Fine example indeed!

    Do more.Post every interesting one you encounter.We,amateurs,need it.

    toet.
    http://www.chessvideos.tv/endgame-training/endgame-simulations.php
  9. 26 Aug '10 12:24
    Originally posted by cmsMaster
    The opposite king is controlled by the engine Crafty.

    The point is that in the initial position black holds the opposition (There are an odd number of squares between the two kings and white is to move). Therefore, white must gain the opposition by moving in a triangle shape in order to queen his pawn.

    This is a basic example but it is essential endgame technique nonetheless.
    What I did was push the pawn for fun and the black king kept backing up, and I just went around the other way once it was a protected passed pawn.
  10. 26 Aug '10 13:51
    Yeah I did it that way too.