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  1. 04 Jan '06 01:53
    Another little issue I didn't see in any past threads. Lets say I am playing as black. A normal King side fianchette has a pawn at: h7,g6,f7, as well as a bishop in the middle at g7. Sometimes I end up with a structure very similar, only my pawn at h7 is at h5.

    1) To me, this structure is a bit fun because my sheltered bishop has 2 ranks to switch in and out of, but is this generally a bad structure or what?

    2) Are queen side fianchettes as popular as king side fianchettes?
  2. Standard member XanthosNZ
    Cancerous Bus Crash
    04 Jan '06 02:13
    Fianchetto.
  3. 04 Jan '06 02:25
    Oops, thanks for the terminology check, but as far as trying to answer my question that doesn't do me too much good.
  4. 04 Jan '06 02:28
    generally the pawn structure with f7-g6-h7 is dangerous, because the square h6 is weakened. If you move the e-pawn, then you weaken the square f6 as well. For the Bishop in question, a1-h8 is a very long diagonal which compensates the bad pawn structure, especially as a Bishop on g7 covers the weak squares. So hold on to that Bishop.
  5. Standard member ark13
    Enola Straight
    04 Jan '06 02:30
    Originally posted by DanFaggella
    Another little issue I didn't see in any past threads. Lets say I am playing as black. A normal King side fianchette has a pawn at: h7,g6,f7, as well as a bishop in the middle at g7. Sometimes I end up with a structure very similar, only my pawn at h7 is at h5.

    1) To me, this structure is a bit fun because my sheltered bishop has 2 ranks to switch in ...[text shortened]... a bad structure or what?

    2) Are queen side fianchettes as popular as king side fianchettes?
    1) It's okay, but generally you want to avoid moving your kingside pawns as much as possible. One reason is that you create space behind the in which your opponent can slip pieces. The other is that the farther advanced your pawns are, the faster your opponent can trade them off for his pawns and attack your open king. I'd generally avoid it, but if your opponent is in no position to attack your king, I wouldn't worry too much about doing it. However, you don't want to waste a move either doing something uncessary.

    2) I'd say kingside ones are more popular. I'm not sure of the reason, but perhaps it's because the king is very safe behind one and they allow quick castling.
  6. Standard member DeepThought
    Losing the Thread
    04 Jan '06 02:34
    Originally posted by ark13
    2) I'd say kingside ones are more popular. I'm not sure of the reason, but perhaps it's because the king is very safe behind one and they allow quick castling.
    If you put the dark squared bishop on b2 then you can't pin the knight on f6.
  7. 04 Jan '06 04:02
    Yes, this is a bad structure. You should avoid it if you can. Only if White threatens something, for example he plays h4 and you can not stop the pawn (for example with a Knight) should you assume this new kingside weakness.
  8. Standard member XanthosNZ
    Cancerous Bus Crash
    04 Jan '06 04:03
    Originally posted by exigentsky
    Yes, this is a bad structure. You should avoid it if you can. Only if White threatens something, for example he plays h4 and you can not stop the pawn (for example with a Knight) should you assume this new kingside weakness.
    Thanks for that. I guess all the various openings that involve the h5 fianchetto must be cooked.
  9. 04 Jan '06 07:35
    Any pawn move creates a weakness, therefore having a pawn on h4 is weaker than one on h2. Queenside fianchetos are not as popular.